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Thread: Cholesterol test results (and hs c-reactive protein) page 2

  1. #11
    Kegas76's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyGobbs View Post
    I was looking at a lipid test from 10 years ago and I had HDL 58, LDL 138, trigs 177.
    Low HDL makes Dr. Friedewald a liar
    LDL cholesterol is calculated from the following equation:
    LDL cholesterol = Total cholesterol – HDL cholesterol – triglycerides/5
    So when your doctor tells you that your LDL cholesterol is X, 99% of the time it has been calculated. ...

    One of the problems with Dr. Friedewald’s calculation is that the lower HDL cholesterol, the less accurate LDL cholesterol becomes. ...

    The lower HDL goes, the more inaccurate LDL becomes. This would be acceptable if most HDLs still permitted reasonable estimation of LDL–but it does not. LDL begins to become significantly inaccurate with HDL below 60 mg/dl.
    Granted your HDL was just barely at the levels mentioned but it was there. It could be that your LDL 10 years ago was actually higher than it was calculated at.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyGobbs View Post
    I'm not saying it's definitely indicative of potential looming heart issues but there's no positives for it being at 5.5. I also had an ultrasound recently and it showed borderline cardiomegamy. I'm 31 and I had high blood pressure that was untreated for a while but now it's finally at optimal levels.
    Hi, i must admit i really couldn't understand why it was done with cholesterol nor why you were concerned. I never knew it was being used as a screening for statins nor as a major player in cardiac risk assessment. It just isn't here. Ive read some of the research and theres big disparity of opinions on it?

    Are you on a statin yet?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbDodger View Post
    Hi, i must admit i really couldn't understand why it was done with cholesterol nor why you were concerned. I never knew it was being used as a screening for statins nor as a major player in cardiac risk assessment. It just isn't here. Ive read some of the research and theres big disparity of opinions on it?

    Are you on a statin yet?

    Not on a statin. Only taking bp meds. I got all the tests done at once. One of them was the high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Probably tested it because of my high blood pressure and borderline cardiomegamy and family history (both parents are athletes but have high bp and high cholesterol). No heart attacks or strokes on either family side though.

  4. #14
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    I just wondered as I came across some new research about statins in the BJM triggering diabetes

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbDodger View Post
    I just wondered as I came across some new research about statins in the BJM triggering diabetes
    So start on statins because of "bad" Chol numbers> get diabetes> go on a ketogenic diet to manage the diabetes> ketogenic diet fixes "bad" Chol numbers. Talk about a roundabout way of fixing things.

  6. #16
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    innit just.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by magicmerl View Post
    So all your ratios are fine, although you do have moderately high triglycerides, which can be reduced by lowering carbs.
    American doctors consider trigs >300 high. 122 isn't high at all. I'm not sure why you think lowering carbs would reduce triglycerides. Triglyceride is fat in your bloodstream. If you want to elevate triglycerides, then elevate free fatty acids in your blood. A great way to raise triglycerides is to drop carbohydrate low and maintain a caloric deficit. This forces free fatty acids into the bloodstream. Elevating carbs should lower the triglycerides since you'll be burning more glucose in lieu of fat, meaning less FFA's in your blood.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    American doctors consider trigs >300 high. 122 isn't high at all. I'm not sure why you think lowering carbs would reduce triglycerides. Triglyceride is fat in your bloodstream. If you want to elevate triglycerides, then elevate free fatty acids in your blood. A great way to raise triglycerides is to drop carbohydrate low and maintain a caloric deficit. This forces free fatty acids into the bloodstream. Elevating carbs should lower the triglycerides since you'll be burning more glucose in lieu of fat, meaning less FFA's in your blood.
    You're right that 122 isn't a particularly high level of trigs. And trigs is fat in your bloodstream. On pretty much everything else, which we've already discussed before on this forum, you're completely wrong. I have no desire to rehash the same tired points with you, since you've already demonstrated the complete inability to change your position when presented with facts that refute your position. You just go silent that then pop up a few months later in your same initial position.

    I'm basically replying so that the OP doesn't think that your post is correct.
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

    Griff's cholesterol primer
    5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
    Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
    TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
    bloodorchid is always right

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by magicmerl View Post
    You're right that 122 isn't a particularly high level of trigs. And trigs is fat in your bloodstream. On pretty much everything else, which we've already discussed before on this forum, you're completely wrong. I have no desire to rehash the same tired points with you, since you've already demonstrated the complete inability to change your position when presented with facts that refute your position. You just go silent that then pop up a few months later in your same initial position.

    I'm basically replying so that the OP doesn't think that your post is correct.
    So your stance is that you don't have any actual facts to support your claim and rather it is simply a belief system?
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    American doctors consider trigs >300 high. 122 isn't high at all. I'm not sure why you think lowering carbs would reduce triglycerides. Triglyceride is fat in your bloodstream. If you want to elevate triglycerides, then elevate free fatty acids in your blood. A great way to raise triglycerides is to drop carbohydrate low and maintain a caloric deficit. This forces free fatty acids into the bloodstream. Elevating carbs should lower the triglycerides since you'll be burning more glucose in lieu of fat, meaning less FFA's in your blood.
    You can temporarily elevate your triglycerides when you release fatty acids into your blood stream. But this happens on ANY diet that causes weight loss because your body is forced to dip into accumulated body fat to make up energy deficits that it's not getting from the food you're eating. Thus, triglycerides are released into the blood stream for energy and levels go up.

    But as soon as you reach maintenance stage this stops because now you're eating enough to maintain weight and not dipping into body fat stores for energy reserves.

    In addition, temporarily elevated triglycerides from a high fat meal should not be an issue. Once they are used for energy, your triglyceride levels drop quite a bit. This is normal and healthy. The only problem with triglycerides is when the level is consistently high and elevated. This is seen in modern SAD eaters because they consume high glycemic foods like white bread, white pasta, sugar, flour, etc. which turn to fat (especially when in a state of caloric excess which is not so uncommon these days). You therefore have these fatty acids flowing around the blood stream before your body absorbs them as body fat.

    This is especially true when you are eating five to six meals a day as advocated by conventional dietary wisdom. If you are constantly eating, there is no time for your body to absorb these fats before the next load is created and your levels stay constantly elevated.

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