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Thread: Only when I don't sport I am recovering on primal page

  1. #1
    Michiel's Avatar
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    Only when I don't sport I am recovering on primal

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    Since I find it so peculiar I thought I'd make a seperate topic about it. Maybe others have found the same in their own way.

    What I have had is a diagnosis of schizophrenia, but that word is really very meaningless. My bad health is better described by saying I have had several psychosis's since 2006. About six or more with horribly boring hospitalization periods and far worse constant fatigue and a frustrated potential of my youth. A terribly lonely time, because the people around you are trained by the pharmaceutical companies, while all those boring years are there so for these exact pharmaceuticals:S But my zombie state seems to be clearing out.

    Anyways this is what I have on health issues. Now I found out without any capability of denial that doing sports or even exercises in my room, will break me down!

    Now I have severe mental health issues and as I understand it a lack of micronutrients play a huge role in this. By the SAD induced inflammation and a poor autoimmune reaction to grains and probably diary my gut wasn't able to give me the right amount of nutrients. Somehow this has been so bad that I can't afford to do any sports. My hypothesis.

    It's undeniable I break down from exercise, but when I mention it to my psychiatrist they ignore it. They are hyper pharmaceutically orientated and serious conversation is just out of the question with them, even though my last psychosis was induced mainly by the much cycling I had to do. The main idea in psychiatry is that sports are good for your mental health. Which does seem like such a logical point of view, but is just not how it works. Also because I already had some psychosis's before, they say it's because of that. They do not want to help you find a way out of the pharmaceutical induced horror.

    When I sport a lot, the first thing I notice is bad sleep. Than fatigue. Than unstableness and ultimately I start hallucinating.

    It's good to mention that I have been quite fatigued all my life. I have been under a lot of psychological violence in my life and when psychiatry came into my life the medications with it certainly didn't help. I think a have a lot of liver damage from it all.

    Now things are going very good. I am full primal since april 1st and after initially trying to work out a lot again I stopped that since a little more than a week now, fully focusing on getting good sleep and ow boy... am I sleeping I have never slept so good in my live! So deep and energizing and mentally clearing

    After maybe a couple of months I'll pick up some easy sports, but the intellectual and mental benefits are the most important! Always!!!

  2. #2
    sbhikes's Avatar
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    They believe that stress is a trigger for schizophrenia so perhaps your body is not healthy enough to take on the stress of exercise.

    I realize the medications they give you are horrible but schizophrenia is also horrible and sadly, the horrors go unrecognized by the sufferer. Do not stop the medications. But also don't fall into the typical schizophrenic self-treatment of endless pots of coffee, sugar sandwiches, 7 packs a day of smoking and sleeping during the day and staying up all night. Exercise on top of any of these, let alone all of them, isn't going to do you any favors. Get your circadian rhythm and nutrition under control first.
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  3. #3
    Michiel's Avatar
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    As someone put it so well in my main topic: not taking SSRI's and living primal are really two sides of the same coin.

    I wouldn't be able to cook primal with medication or cook at all, but also read, paint, play music, get out of bed, get out of my room, be social or just generally: live! I haven't taking any since December.

    I do not want this logical choice part of this discussion.

  4. #4
    Michiel's Avatar
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    Plus I am not the typical schizophrenic, I do not do any of these things. I am also saying this because I don't want to be put in that box: I am not a schizophrenic, I am a human!

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    Michiel, you seem to have been doing well so far with what you're doing, so keep at it. Yes, I'd think give it a month or two of primal before you try some gentle exercise and in the meantime maybe just walking for fresh air. But you seem to be very aware of what the warning signs are and I'm impressed you've been willing and able to stop the sports even though it's disappointing for you. Putting your mental health first is key.

    As for the lack of interest by your psychiatrists, it must be frustrating for you. I suspect like most medical professionals, they're trained to manage the symptoms rather than look at the causes, which leaves it up to us to do the reading and figure out what our individual triggers are. I told my Dr I'd managed to clear my acne after 35 years and his only comment was that it would come back with the medication he was going to prescribe. He wasn't interested in how after 35 years I'd managed to get rid of it entirely, so he had no idea what had got rid of it (cutting out dairy) and how the new medication might affect that. He then suggested that if it did come back, I should ask my for help. Not likely!

    So, yes, I get it that something that is turning your life around and changing your life, being ignored by your doctors, is frustrating. All you can do is keep at it and show them what you can achieve. And try to be patient with the exercise and sports. I think everyone has to find the limits of what they can do while their bodies heal on healthy foods.
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    Michiel's Avatar
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    thanks for the encouragement awoke677

  7. #7
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    There's no doubt that exercise affects neurochemicals and for many people its a good thing but like everything else one size doesn't fit all. The same neurochemicals also affect mood.

    There are some current research trends that are exploring the possibility that psychotic illnesses happen as a result in the changes of the balances of neurotransmitters and that individuals who manifest a psychosis are super-sensitive to fluctuating changes which may be negligible to the majority of people. Dopamine is part of the mechanism of the sleep/wake cycle and its quite well accepted that sleep deprivation can trigger mania and the associated cascade of symptoms in bipolar individuals.
    Research moves slowly in psychiatry with a lot of the faster moving research stemming from drug manufacturers. Less financially motivated research is slower

    I think the most important thing currently is recognising your own trigger symptoms. It seems you are genuinely aware that exercise and sleep disturbances are 2 of yours so you need to gate-keep changes in these areas yourself. I know very little about psychiatry in the Netherlands but in the UK the majority of psychiatrists are very medical model orientated and tend to ignore what doesn't fit in with their opinion.

    If you intend to pursue exercise you'll need to do it in a very measured and mindful way - in real baby steps like we have both done with this way of eating . There are real benefits to exercise- increased strength and self esteem are a couple, but it can't be at the expense of your mental health.

    My personal opinion is that your pleasurable pursuits are probably much more important at this point, reading, art, music and socialising plus a great diet all add a great deal to quality of life and that adds to everyone's mental well-being. Life should be as good as we can make it but none of us can do everything at once.

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