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Thread: Ok, so you roasted some meat... page

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    EMonger's Avatar
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    Ok, so you roasted some meat...

    Primal Fuel
    So say that using the simple "put meat in the oven and roast at 200 for several hours" method I read about here a few days ago, what would you do to it to make it into a variety of meals over the coming week, things for lunch? Different sauces?

    I have a couple of these insulated containers:
    1368884107147.jpg

    So if I make, say, a pork tenderloin roast that's seasoned with salt, pepper, and onion; and some sort of beef roast similarly prepared, how can I use them for the week's lunches?

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    This method is for large cuts of meat that need to cook slowly to tenderize them, not small pieces that cook up very quickly, as pork tenderloin does. Think brisket, or pork shoulder. Besides, your pork tenderloin will serve one hungry person each. There will be no leftovers.

    If you meant pork loin, that is different. It is so lean it should not be well-cooked. I trim the sinewy membrane from the outside (and stew that to tenderize it, dice and put into soup) and roast the meat to an internal temperature of 155F or so.

    When you do cook brisket or pork shoulder using this method, don't forget to cover the pan.
    Last edited by eKatherine; 05-18-2013 at 07:07 AM.

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    Ditto. It really depends on the cut of meat. This works well for a whole chicken or a pan of thighs and drumsticks. (not at 200F though....I cook a whole chicken at 375-400 for about an hour, hour and a half, pieces a little less) Or a pork shoulder, to make pulled pork. That can go in the crock pot.

    It doesn't have to be slow cooked cuts of meat. You can conventionally cook a double or triple batch of any recipe and eat it for days until its gone. And no, you don't get a 'variety' of meals out of it...you eat the same thing till its gone. And there's nothing wrong with that.

    I will also roast or bake a bunch of potatoes and/or veggies. Whatever is left over from dinner gets divided up into containers and put in the freezer for hubby's lunches. So leftovers look alot like the original meal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandra in BC View Post
    Ditto. It really depends on the cut of meat. This works well for a whole chicken or a pan of thighs and drumsticks. (not at 200F though....I cook a whole chicken at 375-400 for about an hour, hour and a half, pieces a little less) Or a pork shoulder, to make pulled pork. That can go in the crock pot.

    It doesn't have to be slow cooked cuts of meat. You can conventionally cook a double or triple batch of any recipe and eat it for days until its gone. And no, you don't get a 'variety' of meals out of it...you eat the same thing till its gone. And there's nothing wrong with that.

    I will also roast or bake a bunch of potatoes and/or veggies. Whatever is left over from dinner gets divided up into containers and put in the freezer for hubby's lunches. So leftovers look alot like the original meal.
    Chicken cooks quickly, and dark meat chicken acquires a marvelous skin texture when cooked at higher temperatures. I don't use this method for cooking things that cook in an hour. Roasted vegetables should be spread out on a cookie sheet, drizzled in oil, and baked, with stirring, until brown.

    The original method I posted was just to put a large chunk of meat in a covered casserole in the oven overnight at 200F and find it done in the morning and ready to shred or eat. Anything else is a different cooking method for a different product.

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    Lean meats (also squid and octopus) can be done two ways. Either quick and hot, or slow and low. I screw up octopus on a regular basis, but fortunately, throwing it in some tomato sauce on medium-low heat for a couple of hours fixes it.

    For freezing, tomato sauce or fat is excellent. Both will provide a barrier to freezer burn. I eat a lot of beef'n'sauce and occasionally pork'n'sauce - just like when I used to eat pasta, but now either without any starch or over some white rice. You could also marinate the cooked beef sliced thinly in some olive oil and vinegar and put it over a salad if you like salads for lunch. I don't know how that would be with pork since I don't think I've ever eaten cold pork except as ham.

    A little curry powder, some milk type product, carrots, and potatoes work well with beef, pork, or chicken. Add chili powder and hot sauce or cayenne to tomato and meat for beanless chili.

    Also, look at non-primal recipes and replace the "bad" ingredients with good ones.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    Lean meats (also squid and octopus) can be done two ways. Either quick and hot, or slow and low. I screw up octopus on a regular basis, but fortunately, throwing it in some tomato sauce on medium-low heat for a couple of hours fixes it.

    For freezing, tomato sauce or fat is excellent. Both will provide a barrier to freezer burn. I eat a lot of beef'n'sauce and occasionally pork'n'sauce - just like when I used to eat pasta, but now either without any starch or over some white rice. You could also marinate the cooked beef sliced thinly in some olive oil and vinegar and put it over a salad if you like salads for lunch. I don't know how that would be with pork since I don't think I've ever eaten cold pork except as ham.

    A little curry powder, some milk type product, carrots, and potatoes work well with beef, pork, or chicken. Add chili powder and hot sauce or cayenne to tomato and meat for beanless chili.

    Also, look at non-primal recipes and replace the "bad" ingredients with good ones.
    Wow that sounds really good. One problem I have is not being able to find good sources of octopus. Where do you get yours?
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    I roast pork loin at 350F until its internal temp is 165-170F. I do this in a countertop convection/rotisserie oven.

    It then gets cooled overnight, then I slice it on my meat slicer and have cold cuts for the week.

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    EMonger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandra in BC View Post
    You can conventionally cook a double or triple batch of any recipe and eat it for days until its gone. And no, you don't get a 'variety' of meals out of it...you eat the same thing till its gone. And there's nothing wrong with that.
    I was saying a variety because someone else, I think eKatherine, had said she uses the slow-roasting method to prepare the meat that she then uses in different recipes.
    I will also roast or bake a bunch of potatoes and/or veggies. Whatever is left over from dinner gets divided up into containers and put in the freezer for hubby's lunches. So leftovers look alot like the original meal.
    That's kind of like what I'd like to do part of the time--freeze some of the leftovers to eat interspersed over the coming weeks, except for the potatoes. I re-read Mark Sisson on potatoes, and it's clear I should avoid them until I weigh what I want to weigh, which is going to be a while.
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    For breakfast a slice of roast meat re-heated by frying briefly in ghee is an excellent sub for bacon - put a couple of eggs on top, fried tomatoes, some cantaloupe on the side - heck why not do some bacon as well and put bacon strips on the slice and let the juices drip all over it.
    Now I'm hungry

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeAtTaree View Post
    For breakfast a slice of roast meat re-heated by frying briefly in ghee is an excellent sub for bacon - put a couple of eggs on top, fried tomatoes, some cantaloupe on the side - heck why not do some bacon as well and put bacon strips on the slice and let the juices drip all over it.
    Now I'm hungry
    You made me hungry too, and it's hours till breakfast

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