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Thread: Ok, so you roasted some meat... page 2

  1. #11
    EMonger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeAtTaree View Post
    For breakfast a slice of roast meat re-heated by frying briefly in ghee is an excellent sub for bacon -
    Ghee, huh? I've heard of it, but I suspect it's one of those crazy-ass things I'll never have. Would coconut oil do? Sometimes things I make with coconut oil get a little too coconut-ty. Would EVOO do?

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    What would Andy Taylor do?

  2. #12
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    Ghee - mate welcome to the wonderful world of Indian Food. Ghee is the perfect cooking fat used by probably a Billion people in Asia and the Near East.

    Take about four pounds of unsalted butter (grass fed if you can) and melt it in a big pan. Simmer very gently for an hour or two. If you have a crockpot then that's ideal, just set and forget for a few hours.

    Butter consists of butter fat of course, but also contains water, proteins and other stuff that causes butter to burn when used for frying, as well as go rancid fairly quickly outside the fridge. Cooking it slowly drives off the water and cooks the other impurities which turn into brown specks that sink to the bottom, leaving you with a pure fat that smells like nutty shortbread.

    When the impurities have been "cooked out" you can either strain through cheesecloth or just ladle very carefully into a jar or container. The ghee will have a lovely nutty flavour, can be used exactly like cooking oil, and will be soft/solid at room temperature. You can just keep it in the cupboard where it will last for months, which is why the Indians invented it millenia ago because they didn't have fridges.

    It's also used in French Cooking "Beurre Noisette".

    Here's a Chicago Sun-Times article on it.

    ghee 1.jpgghee 3.jpg
    Last edited by MikeAtTaree; 05-19-2013 at 05:58 PM. Reason: further info

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeAtTaree View Post
    Take about four pounds of unsalted butter (grass fed if you can) and melt it in a big pan. Simmer very gently for an hour or two. If you have a crockpot then that's ideal, just set and forget for a few hours.
    Would you use high or low on the slow cooker? If I'm ladeling the ghee into a container, am I to do it carefully so I leave out the stuff on the bottom?

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    What would Andy Taylor do?

  4. #14
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    Cooking meats: I'm a big fan of smoking. Slow and low (temp) does it. Tenderloin, ribs, pork shoulder, chickens, whatever.

    Use a charcoal smoker for the best taste, IMHO. It takes time to smoke, but worth it.

    I'm also not above using a crockpot on most kinds of meats either, no matter if "normal" cooking methods call for "fast" type of cooking. I just tried the rub on a shoulder from the "user contributed primal cookbook" that you can download here. That stuff was GREAT!

    And I also use the grill, but not for really thick stuff, like shoulders, roasts, whole tenderloin. Chickens I would spatchcock.

  5. #15
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    In a slow cooker I put it on high till the moisture is bubbling out, about 2 hours, then turn to low for a few hours - I did my last lot for about 5 hours and ladled nearly 100% using a rice serving spoon. The brown bits sink right to the bottom in quite a thin layer. Here's a good article on doing it in a crockpot.

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