Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

Thread: Trying to eat 3 meals a day, but breakfast sets up a binge page 2

  1. #11
    Drumroll's Avatar
    Drumroll is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    3,900
    Primal Fuel
    I notice this too. This is why my "break fast" meal is only once a day now, a-la the warrior diet style. Really does a number in blunting my hunger.

  2. #12
    Omni's Avatar
    Omni is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    979
    Quote Originally Posted by VacillateWildly View Post
    I am well aware of the stressors involved with IFing and I am trying to stop. I have got used to missing breakfast even though I am always hungry in the morning and could always eat it.
    Firstly, not sure what you mean by the "Stressors" of IFing, plenty of people are doing it, there really is no evidence of it being detrimental and many indications of it being healthy, if skipping breakfast results in a healthier mental position for you than eating it, then there is no reason to force yourself to eat breakfast.


    Quote Originally Posted by VacillateWildly View Post
    I am trying to recover from a restrictive eating disorder. I have made concerted efforts to eat breakfast, and usually make it big..........
    Then, a couple of hours later I am ravenous, like starving and overwhelmed ravenous. Then I start eating again and before lunch I have had my daily caloric intake, and my brain tells me I'm binging and then I start to binge and the result is disordered eating chaos. Then I feel like shit, so I vow breakfast is a bad thing.!
    There is a lot of mental controls involved in those statements above, using punishment to discipline a "disobedient" body, that is the ED, eating should not involve mental anguish. Your body may be lacking calories or vital nutrients or may simply be hoarding because of years of deprivation pattern behaviour as dished out by your brain trying to attain some misguided goal. The only real solution is to change your focus from discipline to love & nurture, when your attitude changes towards your body and you start listening to what it wants, it will then start to heal.
    You need to be able to accept and love yourself and your body no matter it's outward appearance, stop comparing it to artificial mental ideals, it is an N=1 process, the ultimate for yourself can not be compared to anyone else irrespective of what your brain or the rest of the world tries to tell you. Healthy diet, fitness and mental state are your measures not scales, mirrors and calorie counters, eat according to your body's desires, keep active and relax your minds desire to control everything, your mind is only in control of your interaction with the outside world, but inside your body is and always will be in charge, when you support your body nutritionally and emotionally it will give you far more than you could have dreamed of.

  3. #13
    dacec's Avatar
    dacec is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    297
    I agree with listening to your body!

    I am an early in the day eater, meaning I consume most of my calories by 2. I just eat and eat and eat. Honestly most of the time I am not very hungry at dinner, but I ALWAYS listen to my body and eat when I am hungry.

    With an eating disorder, your brain and your body may have a disconnect. That is something to that may need work but I worry about you IFing, perhaps right now that is not the best route for you.

  4. #14
    JulieRUNS's Avatar
    JulieRUNS is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Suburban Chicago
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by VacillateWildly View Post
    I am trying to recover from a restrictive eating disorder. I am well aware of the stressors involved with IFing and I am trying to stop. I have got used to missing breakfast even though I am always hungry in the morning and could always eat it.

    I have made concerted efforts to eat breakfast, and usually make it big. Maybe a 5 egg cheese omlette with some tomato or vegetables followed by a smoothie made with berries, bananas, Greek yoghurt and A2 milk. Then, a couple of hours later I am ravenous, like starving and overwhelmed ravenous. Then I start eating again and before lunch I have had my daily caloric intake, and my brain tells me I'm binging and then I start to binge and the result is disordered eating chaos. Then I feel like shit, so I vow breakfast is a bad thing.

    Has anyone else had this? I am aware of 'extreme hunger' as a direct result of chronic restricting and how it opens up to maddening food cravings. I am not underweight but I don't want to gain either. This doesn't happen if I don't eat till lunchtime, and I don't know why.

    I want to try for 3 meals a day, but I can't cope with the hunger. Would meat at breakfast help me? Help me!
    Without fail, I have this problem if I cook my eggs in coconut oil, or if I have fruit or carbs in the morning. I switched to simmering my veggies (for omelet) in a little olive oil - a little longer and slower. I now can go until noon before I need to eat.

  5. #15
    YogaBare's Avatar
    YogaBare is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    . . .
    Posts
    4,540
    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    There is a lot of mental controls involved in those statements above, using punishment to discipline a "disobedient" body, that is the ED, eating should not involve mental anguish.

    The only real solution is to change your focus from discipline to love & nurture, when your attitude changes towards your body and you start listening to what it wants, it will then start to heal.

    Healthy diet, fitness and mental state are your measures, not scales, mirrors and calorie counters

    your mind is only in control of your interaction with the outside world, but inside your body is and always will be in charge, when you support your body nutritionally and emotionally it will give you far more than you could have dreamed of.
    Beautiful advice.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  6. #16
    jammies's Avatar
    jammies is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,518
    I find that dairy in the morning or late at night sets me up for blood sugar swings that cause me to overeat. Could you try leaving dairy out of your breakfast? Stick with high fat, moderate protein. Perhaps more meat, eggs, and veggies, carbs from tubers, no dairy at all, and a bit less fruit?
    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

    http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

  7. #17
    VacillateWildly's Avatar
    VacillateWildly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by Z0oom View Post
    Have you considered moving your smoothie consumption to later in the day? Maybe that is raising and then lowering your blood sugar enough to trigger hunger sensations.

    Have you tried fueling your body on mostly fats? If I were you, I would have your smoothie as a dessert, and eat meat with eggs in the morning. So maybe your day might look like, bacon/sausage/steak/leftovers and eggs for breakfast.

    At lunch maybe just have enough to tide you over, like an avocado with lime and salt.

    Then for dinner have your usual entree, side(s), and your dessert smoothie.

    My idea is just trying to stay low carb/sugar until in the evening. If you still get these hunger spikes....well then I would eat something, maybe you are increasing your energy expenditure and need more food.

    You mentioned meeting your caloric intake, roughly what are you trying to stick around? Depending on your goals, are you trying to increase, decrease or maintain this number?
    Thanks Z0oom. I only added the smoothies in the past couple of weeks because I have been craving them. I can see the risk of blood sugar spiking, but with our without the smoothie, with or without extra fats and meat, I still get hungry. I didn't eat breakfast today but was crazy for a smoothie so had one after my normal lunch. About half an hour later I wanted another one, but I didn't. That craving passed.

    I don't really know what my caloric goals are, probably about 2000 daily would be my requirement. I don't calorie count, except sometimes just to see and sometimes out of blind panic. I might eat between 1300 and 4000 calories depending on my level of restricting or binging, I actually have no real idea. If I'm brutally honest with myself, I could do with a couple of extra kilos.

    [QUOTE=aprimalmomma;1194280]I have the exact same issue and found IF to be a godsend...QUOTE]

    IF is definitely not a godsend for me, I've used it to sink further into restrictive eating and I feel quite stuck by it. I want to stop, but I find the hunger after breakfast and even the guilt of having breakfast overwhelming.

    Quote Originally Posted by YogaBare View Post
    Vac, I know the extreme hunger is disturbing But if your body is sending you those signals, you do need the nutrition. I really think the binging is a result from holding back from the body's needs. What are you binging on? Are you having cravings?

    If you're trying to recover you're going to have to accept that you will initially gain. It doesn't mean you'll gain much, or stay at the new weight forever, but there will be some gain.

    I'm trying to think back to when I was in active recovery, and I think the extreme hunger got better with eating lots of liver (in the form of pate). Seriously! I would eat it as if it was a slice of cake. Are you still restricting fruit?
    I'm craving dairy, hence all the smoothies, I'd had one to two a day for the last 10 days. I've started eating fruit too, I only buy seasonal stuff, so there are always at the moment pears and persimmons and frozen berries. I find fruit quite unappealing in winter but these ones I do like. When I binge I either pick at primal food in the fridge and then overeat my evening meal (at which point I'm not hungry, but eat anyway as an act of self-sabotage. Or I hit the Fuck It switch and eat whole packets of highly processed choc chip cookies and oat bars. I eat liver at least once a week, but I'm not sure I could eat pate like cake, my ED head would be screaming at me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Black Timber View Post
    It seems like you are on your way to recovery. I would think that if you are more comfortable If'ing then there is no harm there. Being extremely hungry and stressing over it, will be a lot worse for you than any downside of If'ing. You need to feel comfortable with your eating habits. From what I understand, intermittent fasting like the 16-8 breakdown has more benefits than draw-backs. I have not had to deal with an ED but I understand the hunger issue after eating. It's like there is a eating switch that gets turned on as soon as you break fast. For that reason I have been If'ing for a while now, am finding it easier to maintain my weight and have great energy all day. Good luck to you.
    This is my dilemma. I'm not more comfortable IFing, I know that if I want my mind and body to heal and recover then I need to stop. But you're right, the anxiety that ensues from setting off a day of eating doesn't seem worth it. It's all in my head, I know that, but I don't understand why I'm not the same after lunch and this only happens to me at breakfast time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    Firstly, not sure what you mean by the "Stressors" of IFing, plenty of people are doing it, there really is no evidence of it being detrimental and many indications of it being healthy, if skipping breakfast results in a healthier mental position for you than eating it, then there is no reason to force yourself to eat breakfast.



    There is a lot of mental controls involved in those statements above, using punishment to discipline a "disobedient" body, that is the ED, eating should not involve mental anguish. Your body may be lacking calories or vital nutrients or may simply be hoarding because of years of deprivation pattern behaviour as dished out by your brain trying to attain some misguided goal. The only real solution is to change your focus from discipline to love & nurture, when your attitude changes towards your body and you start listening to what it wants, it will then start to heal.
    You need to be able to accept and love yourself and your body no matter it's outward appearance, stop comparing it to artificial mental ideals, it is an N=1 process, the ultimate for yourself can not be compared to anyone else irrespective of what your brain or the rest of the world tries to tell you. Healthy diet, fitness and mental state are your measures not scales, mirrors and calorie counters, eat according to your body's desires, keep active and relax your minds desire to control everything, your mind is only in control of your interaction with the outside world, but inside your body is and always will be in charge, when you support your body nutritionally and emotionally it will give you far more than you could have dreamed of.
    Intellectually, I know this. But years of self-punishment seem monumental right now. I need to start with eating what I need based around 3 meals a day plus whatever else is required. I barely know how to listen to my body any more.

    There may be many people IFing, but that doesn't make it a good thing. I am a lean, calorie restricted woman with young children who doesn't get enough sleep and my hormones are so out of whack I bleed sporadically and haven't had a regular period for over 6 years. Fasting is not a good thing for women like me and I wish I'd never been tempted by it.

    Paleo for Women | Fasting

    Should Women Fast? | Mark's Daily Apple

    Quote Originally Posted by dacec View Post
    I agree with listening to your body!

    I am an early in the day eater, meaning I consume most of my calories by 2. I just eat and eat and eat. Honestly most of the time I am not very hungry at dinner, but I ALWAYS listen to my body and eat when I am hungry.

    With an eating disorder, your brain and your body may have a disconnect. That is something to that may need work but I worry about you IFing, perhaps right now that is not the best route for you.
    Thanks dacec I worry about myself too. I don't know how to listen to my body. I start eating and it can turn into a food fight before I even know it. I admire people who can listen to their body, I have a friend who does just that and leaves food on her plate or had two lunches depending on her hunger. An ectomorph, but still, I'm so envious.

    Quote Originally Posted by jammies View Post
    I find that dairy in the morning or late at night sets me up for blood sugar swings that cause me to overeat. Could you try leaving dairy out of your breakfast? Stick with high fat, moderate protein. Perhaps more meat, eggs, and veggies, carbs from tubers, no dairy at all, and a bit less fruit?
    The dairy aspect is quite new for me Jammies. I was using it to try and fill myself up.

  8. #18
    VacillateWildly's Avatar
    VacillateWildly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by CiKi90 View Post
    Hey VW, I understand where you're coming from, completely! It's great that you're aiming for 3 meals a day, but I have some questions for you to consider so that I can help you out as best as I know how.

    1. What time do you wake up, and what time do you try to eat breakfast?
    2. Are you planning your meals out, or counting calories/macros?
    3. What time do you eat your last meal before you go to bed?
    4. How do you feel, emotionally, while preparing breakfast, or after you've just eaten it?
    5. What is your schedule like during the day? Do you have to go out to work as soon as you're finished eating, or do you stay at home?
    6. Are you restricting and depriving yourself of cravings (if you're having them) or trying to eat strictly in a certain way?

    There are so many reasons why you may feel so hungry right after breakfast. I, personally, went through the same thing. During active recovery, I was obviously obsessed with food -- but I was allowing myself to actually eat it! I did still try to plan out meals, but in no way did I count calories. I ate what I liked, as long as it was nutrient-dense, and allowed plenty of treats in between meals. Honestly, maybe you need the calories. I'm going to say that if you physically feel hungry, you do need food. Whenever you get back to me on all those questions I asked, I'll have better insight and try to give you more adequate advice!

    Listen to your body, it really knows best. I know, easier said than done. It can be scary! But we're all here to support you.
    Thanks Cierra, I would appreciate your input as I know you have good experience.

    1.I wake at 4.45am so I can have time to journal and do my recovery readings and meditation before my children wake up around 5.30-6.00am. I try to have breakfast with them at about 7am. When I don't eat I still sit with them and drink coffee.
    2. I vaguely plan my meals in terms of what there is in the fridge and if I need to go to the shops. Otherwise I try not to plan as it increases the obsession. I do eat two nutritious and large meals, but large does include a lot of vegetables some days.
    3. We eat at about 6.30pm at night. I normally eat lunch which to my horror gives me a 19/5 window, I didn't realize I fasted for so long. That's really bad.
    4. I find mornings really stressful....fighting children, wet beds, laundry, homework etc. I do as much as I can the night before, but my children are still young (3 and 5) so a lot of attention and time is needed. Also cooking eggs 3 ways is a stress in itself! Sometimes when I do sit down to eat I'm already stressed out. But not always. Sometimes (recently) I feel fabulous after breakfast because I know I really needed the food and I feel full and vital. Sometimes I feel a it guilty and ask myself whether I could have done without it.
    5. My schedule is non-stop. I take my eldest to school then work through any appointments, cooking, housework etc. I go to the gym 3 mornings a week, fasting doesn't seem to affect my workout but recently I have felt quite depleted sometimes. Then I work as soon as my husband gets home, then as soon as I've done that I get the family dinner then the kids to bed then I crash at about 8.30. I like a schedule, I feel much better with a routine.
    6. I vacillate wildly (of course) between mindsets. So one day I might be recovery-tastic and launch into a mighty breakfast and eat all day and not worry. But the next day I might panic and try to restrict. I am definitely making efforts to listen to cravings, which is where my smoothie obsession is coming from. Other days I deny all hunger signals and only allow myself meals. Other days I get so hungry a biscuit feeding frenzy occurs, then the restricting cycle starts all over again. I've increased carbs recently too, some rice and potato and sweet potato, but then I panic with this too and think I'm going to fail and die as a sugar-burner.

  9. #19
    VacillateWildly's Avatar
    VacillateWildly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by sopnishwhite View Post
    Breakfast is highly important for your daily lifestyle. First of all it curbs your hunger and keeps you healthy and fit.
    No, it really, really does not. That is why I opened the thread.

  10. #20
    Omni's Avatar
    Omni is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    979
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Well, that adds a bit more detail to the picture.
    Agreed IF is out of the picture at the moment, it might be something you drift into down the track, but with your current condition it isn't likely to be beneficial.

    Sounds very much like you just need to eat more nutritious food, try to stick to good healthy primal foods, don't restrict, even if you need to snack, as YogaBear said, you may gain a little in the process, but likely this is what your body needs.

    Your body needs to feel that it is not in a starvation situation and the only way to do that is give it food when it wants food, the cravings and snacking will subside and you will be able to settle into a comfortable 3 meal routine with just the occassional snack.
    You need to trust your body and your body will trust you.
    Personally I would stay away from smoothies, they go down too easy and don't fill you up physically, better to do the real thing and chew food and chew it well, spend time savouring the flavours.

    There is another factor likely at play too and that is when people generally switch to Primal, you drop quite a bit of "quick fix sugar" from processed foods, so there is likely a blood sugar/insulin adjustment that takes place in the first month or two, most people find there is a greater urge for craving at this time, for that I found nuts & seeds are good, they provide some slow release carbs which help minimise insulin spiking while your body adjusts.

    So IMO for a good month you just need to let go and trust, eat as you need to, don't fight it, even the idea of enforcing a three meal regimen at this point will be counter productive, and as the ladies said on the "Women who eat a ton" thread, so what if you gain a bit of weight, if you don't feel better you can always go back to the Yo-yo dieting you know so well, but I dare say that won't be the case, more likely you'll realise that there is only a few lb's/kg's difference between constant craving and comfortable satiety, but you do have to take a leap of faith and trust your body.
    Last edited by Omni; 05-18-2013 at 02:11 AM.
    "There are no short cuts to enlightenment, the journey is the destination, you have to walk this path alone"

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •