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  1. #1
    Traderjodie's Avatar
    Traderjodie is offline Junior Member
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    Please Help: Husband died recently from heart attack

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    Hello everyone,

    My dear husband died suddenly from a massive heart attack three weeks ago. He had two risk factors, a family history of heart disease and obesity. All his other numbers were always fine. Normal blood pressure, normal cholesterol, etc. He had no warnings before his death. The death certificate lists, stenosing atherosclerosis as the cause of death.

    I have three children. We are of course all devastated, but also terribly frightened.

    Here is my question: If you knew your children had a very very strong family history of heart disease and obesity, what would you do? What would you feed them? What medical tests would you insist they have as they get older?

    I am driving myself crazy trying to read through all the studies and I just can't seem to find any answers.

    Thank you for your help.

  2. #2
    Leida's Avatar
    Leida is offline Senior Member
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    I am so sorry about your loss! It is a huge tragedy for you and your family.

    Just like you, I try to safeguard my child, and after a few years I have acquired a huge amount of skepticism towards nutritional science and research. So, I go with what my gut tells me: that fresh, non-processed food without added synthetic anything (be that oils, sugar, or preservatives) is the best; that time spent actively playing outdoors beats any other pass-time and that exposure to electronics should be limited to the minimum. I believe that non-glutenous real grains (not milled etc) and legumes can be added once in a while, but tubers are better. I do not cut milk, cheese and butter, but I would if I notice the signs of lactose intolerance.
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    MarissaLinnea's Avatar
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    I would suggest a diet consisting of healthy fats, carbs and proteins and try to minimize processed foods as much as possible. Of course understanding that they are children and will be eating the occasional processed good or treat.

    I also wanted to say that I am so sorry to hear of your loss. That is truly tragic and unexpected and I can't even imagine. You and your family are in my thoughts and prayers. (((hugs)))

  4. #4
    namelesswonder's Avatar
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    If obesity or other health issues came into play, I would insist on having my arteries examined. I would want someone to actually look for plaque build-up, not just rely on cholesterol and blood pressure.

    I would also emphasize the importance of stress reduction, as well as fresh, minimally processed foods.
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    diene's Avatar
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    I'm so sorry for your loss. I find that family history is actually a huge risk factor. My boyfriend has a terrible family history of heart disease (on both sides of the family). I think a strict version of the standard paleo/primal diet would be beneficial--the most important elements, IMO, are to eliminate gluten and processed seed oils (canola, corn, safflower, sunflower, etc.). An excessive amount of omega-6 fatty acids increase inflammation, and inflammation plays a role in heart disease. The levels of C-reactive protein should also be tested since that is a marker for inflammation. (I think C-reactive protein testing is pretty standard for people with a family history of heart disease.)

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    Damiana's Avatar
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    My condolences on your loss. I'd also recommend your children stay active and away from processed foods. Here is an article I recently read that you might find informative.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/13/he...-a-family.html
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    The others have said what I would, too- but I just wanted to add my sympathy and best wishes for your family. I lost my Mum to a heart attack (no warning signs) in Dec last year and I'm still reeling. Go easy on yourself and let others take care of you, too.
    Sending hugs and peace and love your way.

  8. #8
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    I am so sorry for your loss. I am worried for my daughter as well. We lost my husband/her dad last year to heart failure caused by radiation treatments for Hodgkins Lymphoma.

    I don't believe it is the healthiest diet, but the Pritikin diet is proven to reverse heart disease. You should know this in case it comes up. I believe Ornish is similar. They have demonstrated this - you can probably find lectures on youtube with the before and after results.

    If healthy, I do believe avoiding processed food is key. No flour, no sugar, no industrial seed oils/transfats.

    Whenever we go out to eat, I lean toward authentic asian cuisine, preferably soups where you can observe whether there is any oil in the food. I think this is the most dangerous part of the diet - you don't know what you are getting when you go out.

  9. #9
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    Practicing medicine based on family history is malpractice IMO and here is why....

    Take any indigenous healthy culture and ask them did your great grandfather have heart disease? How bout your grandfather? Father? Mother? Siblings? No. No. No. No. and No.

    Now feed them crap for 4-5 generations and you'll get at least 3 yeses and a supposed increase "risk" to developing heart disease yourself. BUNK!

    To answer your questions I feed myself and my kids human whole foods that take little to no processing to be consumed in their natural state. I get no medical testing done, but instead spend money on health promoting activities and holistic health modalities. I will not get any extensive medical testing done and see no need to as long as I live a lifestyle congruent with my nature.... from there on I rely on the bodies capacity for self healing through its innate intelligence and processes.

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    So sorry for your loss.
    And don't fall for that idea that children are any different from other humans, that children need carbs. My mom literally bullied me if I even looked at the margarine and sugar covered bread loafs other kids had. That was so right! Healthy food from the beginning, not feeding shit and then at some magical point transfering to normal.

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