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Thread: Going Blind if not Wearing Sunglasses? page 2

  1. #11
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    I was getting bored with my contacts, so when I got my last pair of glasses, I got the lenses that transition from light to dark. I absolutely love them. The only time I notice they're doing their job is when I go from very dark lighting to very bright or vice versa. Otherwise they just gradually protect my eyes. I'd never go back.

    When I wore contacts daily, I had lots of different sunglasses from serious men in black to goofy or fun. I'm dark with dark eyes. I don't know how to explain it, but when I wear good polarizing sunglasses, it just feels like I'm doing good for my eyes. Sort of like you don't really know you're straining your eyes 'til you stop. That's just my take.
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  2. #12
    Leida's Avatar
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    Thanks, folks. The only person in my family that I remember who had eye problems was my grandma, and she did not get problems till she was over 70... I guess, I will start wearing glasses. But boy, I hate them, keep losing, dropping, squashing them, and they rub behind my ears and my nose, fog up, get dirty...
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  3. #13
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    I find if I am in the sun all day without sunglasses I also get headaches that feel like they are coming from my eyes, like my eyes are sore.

  4. #14
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    I am from a country where everybody has blue or gray eyes, even hazel is rare and brown - extremely rare. Sure, we do wear sunglases for our comfort but not non-stop. Older country ladies like my grandmother, her sister, step sister, etc did not have any sunglases, lived till nearly 90 and no cataracts. My mom at 72 had eye surgery for better vision but no cataract (if it was there, gues they could do it at the same time). No problems for my dad. And so on. Actually I have not seen anybody with cataract, except some old dogs, but thats different.
    Imagine that the blue colour is made a scape goat because its different from majority.

  5. #15
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    Both my parents blue-eyed and brown-eyed had cataract surgery. If there's a link to actual eye-colour, then I suspect it's more likely to be via skin colour and thus differing rates of vit D production. I've heard some mentions of eyesight responding to D3 supplementation and also I'm sure one of the paleo/low-carb books I've read mentions sugar intake wrt cataract. Sorry, can't recall which ... ah, Loren Cordain in the Paleo answer links them to lactose and galactose in milk - p100. Apparently lab animals are routinely given high milk and lactose diets to induce cataracts.

    I've worn glasses since I was 16 until recently when I started on eye exercises to improve my myopia. With all I've read now, I'm pretty sure my eyesight problems, which only occurred at 16, were linked to a deteriorating diet that was also responsible for 35 years of constant acne - most likely the shift just before then from raw milk to supermarket milk .

    When I do the eye exercises (which I'm sure that most opticians/optometrists will tell you don't work) they do work and my eyesight/prescription has improved since I started, even though I'm inconsistent. I'm willing to bet this is another modern ailment (didn't Weston Price notice lower levels of myopia in HG societies?) that's down to the modern diet. Grok didn't have sunglasses, which is a reasonable clue that our eyes evolved to deal effectively with natural sunlight. The impact of modern diet and the differing wavelengths of electronic screens, however, are a different matter. At the moment I see much clearer in bright sunlight (hazel eyes, red hair, pale skin) so even though I like the 'look' I don't wear sunglasses unless I need to use my prescription lenses and then the tinted ones are favourites.

    Sorry, can't see sunglasses doing as much to prevent cataracts as tweaking diet.
    Me, My Father and The Alzheimer's - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread84213.html

  6. #16
    fastersteve's Avatar
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    Curious.

    I've recently pretty much stopped wearing sunglasses, thinking about the get up and get some sun in your eyes line I read somewhere, and thinking that Grok didn't have RayBans.
    I have to say that I'm surprised by how little the sun bothers me now.

    I have blue eyes, and my Dad had cataract surgery at 78.

    My inner skeptic says that Optometrist will always say you need them so they can sell you some.

  7. #17
    Leida's Avatar
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    Well, I remember that some traditional cultures wore hair screens to prevent snow-blindness. I am wondering if it is the case of moving from one's native environment. Like if I moved to Florida or California, it might have been a problem, but here, up north? Does it matter?
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  8. #18
    Leida's Avatar
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    Also, folks, does anyone has any links on dairy and cataracts/blindness? I can't find anything with a search. Cordain is not the most recent source, so I was wondering if there has been any compelling articles about it? I am going back and forth between eating Greek Yogurt/cheese and not (I don't drink milk), so that would be a good point in favor of dropping dairy for me.
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  9. #19
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    There seem to be plenty of articles etc if you google cataracts and lactose, no idea how many are studies/papers as opposed to opinion.

    Of course, that dairy induces cataracts in lab animals doesn't prove anything since some humans at least have evolved some level of lactose digestion/tolerance, that rabbits and rats don't have.
    Me, My Father and The Alzheimer's - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread84213.html

  10. #20
    Erik W's Avatar
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    Living in Sweden I have never heard of this. And most of the people I see outside don't wear sunglasses even though I think they should, because constantly squinting gives you wrinkles really fast. (So wear sunglasses in the summer, people! Even when it is cloudy outside, because the sun shines through the clouds and bothers your eyes all the same. Once you start wearing sunglasses regularly you will really feel the difference between wearing them and not wearing them. Sunglasses are more relaxing for your eyes.)

    I know that blue eyes see better in the dark, that's a a fact. It has to do with breaking down colors in some way. But higher risk for blindness? I have never heard that people in Nordic countries would have a higher risk for blindness, and I usually follow health statistics of all kinds. If there is a higher risk ... it must be very small. Kind of like how mushroom increases the risk for cancer, but only if you eat lots and lots of it.

    However, pale skin is at higher risk for skin cancer, that's a no-brainer. But just as long as you move around normally, and don't fry yourself at the beach, you don't have to worry much. I never liked that beach-frying process. Sure, a little tan is nice, but looking like a brownie? The skin gets all leathery after just a few years of that. It is not worth it.
    Last edited by Erik W; 05-15-2013 at 11:05 AM.

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