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    dbowden19's Avatar
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    Problem staying with training programs. Any advice?

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    Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum but have been following a primal lifestyle for about 3 years now. During this time, I have also discovered new methods of training that don't involve traditional bodybuilding type exercises. I have acquired quite a collection of unconventional training equipment and workout at home rather than go to a gym. My problem is that I love using all of it and am having a hard time finding a program that I can stick with because most don't include everything that I have - sandbag, gymnastics rings, pullup bar, barbell/plates, kettle bell and battling rope. I also want it to include bodyweight exercises.

    My goal is to get stronger while improving endurance. I've tried Crossfit and found it to be very challenging (which I loved) but too random and not really well thought out. I didn't go to a box, I did a home version of it, but did it long enough to know it wasn't for me.

    I'm not sure if there is a solution to my problem or not. Am I trying too hard and focused too much on the "program" rather than workouts? There are a ton of workouts I could do but I feel like I need the progression from an actual training program.

    Has anyone else had this problem or something similar?

    Debbie

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbowden19 View Post
    Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum but have been following a primal lifestyle for about 3 years now. During this time, I have also discovered new methods of training that don't involve traditional bodybuilding type exercises. I have acquired quite a collection of unconventional training equipment and workout at home rather than go to a gym. My problem is that I love using all of it and am having a hard time finding a program that I can stick with because most don't include everything that I have - sandbag, gymnastics rings, pullup bar, barbell/plates, kettle bell and battling rope. I also want it to include bodyweight exercises.

    My goal is to get stronger while improving endurance. I've tried Crossfit and found it to be very challenging (which I loved) but too random and not really well thought out. I didn't go to a box, I did a home version of it, but did it long enough to know it wasn't for me.

    I'm not sure if there is a solution to my problem or not. Am I trying too hard and focused too much on the "program" rather than workouts? There are a ton of workouts I could do but I feel like I need the progression from an actual training program.

    Has anyone else had this problem or something similar?

    Debbie
    There is a solution to your problem. You have to forget workouts and start to train. Design a program that utilizes all the equipment you have if you so desire, but make it progressive, rather than random.

    T NATION | The Biggest Training Fallacy of All

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    I have a similar problem in that I want to learn Olympic lifting but I also follow a strength program. I don't want to overdo it. I end up having two days of my main program and one day of the Olympic lifting class and then practicing my Olympic lifts and their bits and pieces becomes accessory exercises to my main program. Works because I can't do the Olympic lifts very heavy at all.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbowden19 View Post
    Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum but have been following a primal lifestyle for about 3 years now. During this time, I have also discovered new methods of training that don't involve traditional bodybuilding type exercises. I have acquired quite a collection of unconventional training equipment and workout at home rather than go to a gym. My problem is that I love using all of it and am having a hard time finding a program that I can stick with because most don't include everything that I have - sandbag, gymnastics rings, pullup bar, barbell/plates, kettle bell and battling rope. I also want it to include bodyweight exercises.

    My goal is to get stronger while improving endurance. I've tried Crossfit and found it to be very challenging (which I loved) but too random and not really well thought out. I didn't go to a box, I did a home version of it, but did it long enough to know it wasn't for me.

    I'm not sure if there is a solution to my problem or not. Am I trying too hard and focused too much on the "program" rather than workouts? There are a ton of workouts I could do but I feel like I need the progression from an actual training program.

    Has anyone else had this problem or something similar?

    Debbie
    You seem to be "suffering" from a paralysis of analysis - don't overthink stuff -just do it...

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    I am following Wendler's 531 with my auxillary lifts bring body weight exercises. I'm just getting started, but hope this will satisfy my similar feelings you are having.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    There is a solution to your problem. You have to forget workouts and start to train. Design a program that utilizes all the equipment you have if you so desire, but make it progressive, rather than random.

    T NATION | The Biggest Training Fallacy of All
    That makes alot of sense and I have tried designing my own program. It does feel random because I'm not sure if I'm doing what I need to do to progress. I know that strength gains come with low reps/heavy objects (sandbag, barbell, etc) or difficult bodyweight exercises (handstand pushups, pistols) and endurance is developed using higher reps/lighter objects or easier bodyweight exercises with little rest. Could it be that simple? Perhaps my problem is second-guessing and overanalyzing!

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    dbowden19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbag View Post
    You seem to be "suffering" from a paralysis of analysis - don't overthink stuff -just do it...
    You're spot on with that! It's quite frustrating!

    Debbie

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    One solution is to adopt Art DeVince's approach to program: to have no program, but do whatever feels like the best thing that day, be it 50 light squats or 1 max rep. Crossfit uses that approach, but it is not targeted to anyone in particular.

    Which endurance are you talking about, muscular or cardiovascular? If muscular, rest easy, strength training adds to that as well.If cardiovascular, strength training will get at it as well, but only to a degree. 20 min run after lifts should take care of it, though when lifts go higher, those 20 min will not longer appeal.

    If you are looking at a progressive training, download one of the charts that will calculate your lifts for you for every next workout and will keep you to it. In my experience, the best results I have got in terms of progressive training was on the good old SL 5x5 with no additional high impact cardio. The biggest gains I made on an intermediate programe was the madcow version of 5x5, but I crashed right after it and never managed to replicate those highest lifts afterwards.

    Programming is tough, and the amount of the equipment available is tempting. For many years now I try to sneak kettlebells and dumbbells in addition to the bar, simply because I love it. But overall, I find that 2 main lifts and at most 3 supports for a total of about 1 hr lifting is where it is effective.

    I made myself pick the super-moves, the ones I cannot drop, no matter what, and I narrowed it down to the main 5 compound barbell lifts, split and jerk, KB TGU, KB snatch, pull-up, and a barbell overhead walk. That doesn't mean that from time to time I don't do a few bicep curl or back dumbbell rows if I feel like it, but I do not consider it training. Just fun.

    Sometimes I feel that the art of coming up with the program is in dropping rather than adding things.
    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
    When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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    As long as you are continuing to work out every other dayish, then you should be fine. It really depends what your goals are...?

    For my home gym I only have a self built pull up bar and a treadmill. Everything else is body weight exercises or outside activities.

    It does not take much to stay in shape IMO. check out scoobys workshop (google) for a good starting place for home workouts. My simple goal is to remain fit, I test myself against the FBI training criteria (again google) which is pretty intense.

    If you have equipment not being used then Craigslist can help.
    Full on Primal family and loving it!!!
    This is going to be a big year for vitamins and minerals!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbowden19 View Post
    That makes alot of sense and I have tried designing my own program. It does feel random because I'm not sure if I'm doing what I need to do to progress. I know that strength gains come with low reps/heavy objects (sandbag, barbell, etc) or difficult bodyweight exercises (handstand pushups, pistols) and endurance is developed using higher reps/lighter objects or easier bodyweight exercises with little rest. Could it be that simple? Perhaps my problem is second-guessing and overanalyzing!
    Strength comes from progressively increasing the resistance (intensity) of your exercises. Anything will elicit strength gains in a detrained individual, but it sounds like you've gotten to the plateau that occurs past that point and it's time for some kind of dedicated programming.

    Endurance is strength-dependent. I always advocating getting strong first. Strength is a much more persistent adaptation than conditioning. For example, a person who can deadlift 500 lbs has a much easier time doing lots of reps with 135 than someone who can only deadlift 225, regardless of their comparative levels of conditioning.

    If the former guy or girl wants to build strength endurance, s/he can do that in a very much shorter period of time than it takes to get from being a 225-lb deadlifter to being a 500-lb deadlifter. As in a tiny fraction of a fraction as much time. A couple weeks vs. several years. Get strong first.

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