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Thread: Flour alternatives primal or not...?

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  1. #1
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    Flour alternatives primal or not...?

    I have been planning a carb reload day... That day.. I want to have pizza.. I found a great recipe that has no nuts it in (trying to cut back on them), but it's made from Tapioca Flour, Coconut Flour, and Arrowroot. I'm just not sure how I feel about tapioca flour... is it really "Primal". I would not eat it everyday or even every other day.. but I could be open to using it on my re load day (I stay primal, but just a higher carb day). The only thing I'm worried about is eating tapioca flour and it hurting my gut like wheat does!! **GULP**

    To the point:
    What do you all think about this list of kind-a-primal ingredients. Obviously, if you think all of these are bad.. I totally get that.. but I'm asking for people who have done a lot of research on these products to give a thought out answers... I think this would be helpful for a lot of people... So please.. if you just are against this, post somewhere else, please! thank you.

    1. Arrowroot - The root of the arrowroot plant is ground into flour. Arrowroot flour is a bland and fine powder that becomes clear when cooked. Used mainly as a sauce thickener but used in some bread recipes Great thickening for clear sauces. Arrowroot is a herb

    2. Tapioca Flour -Made from the root of the cassava plant. Ground is a light and fine white flour. Adds a chewy texture and thickening agents.

    3. Green Plantain Flour (I here is stuff is awesome- obviously only if you eat bananas)

    4. Amaranth Flour
    Made from the seed of the Amaranth plant. The Amaranth plant is a green leafy vegetable. The seeds are rich in protein. Amaranth flour is a wheat flour alternative used in baking. Alternative names: African spinach, Chinese spinach, Indian spinach and elephant ear. Not allowed in Paleo Diet

    5. Maize Flour *(I found this on a paleo website and I thought it was interesting...)
    Maize flour is heavier than corn flour. Maize flour is ground from corn. Corn not allowed in Paleo Diet.



    Will tapioca flour hurt my guts like wheat?

  2. #2
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    I'd go with the Tapioca flour, I regularly eat Yucca (Cassava) and its a very harmless starch... Excellent for a refeed. There's also white rice flour..I use it to make pancakes on occasion. And no, Tapioca definitely should not hurt your stomach its basically pure starch.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCates190 View Post
    I'd go with the Tapioca flour, I regularly eat Yucca (Cassava) and its a very harmless starch... Excellent for a refeed. There's also white rice flour..I use it to make pancakes on occasion. And no, Tapioca definitely should not hurt your stomach its basically pure starch.
    Ohhhh really? I like what i'm hearing..

    So, tell me about "starch" people complain about it... ? educate me! haha. I read and read and read.. sometimes i don't find the answers! (or I don't look at the right places for the right answer)

    personally I can't do rice (stomach issues), but good to know

  4. #4
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    I consider all flours to be decadent/celebratory foods due to the low-H2O/portion hazard but lack of seed toxins is definitely a plus. Blending them tends to mask their individual drawbacks:

    Coconut flour is nice and low-cal so I always include it but the fiber absorption can get out of control so I limit it to 25% of the blend.

    Almond, golden flax, hazelnut and other tree nuts/flower seeds have great flavor and texture but the calorie/polyunsaturate load adds up quickly so I also try not to use them alone.

    Ground chia adds a nice spongy "chew" factor (I use white chia so it doesn't discolor the product), again around 25%.

    Tapioca/potato/arrowroot starch are good if you want more carb/less fat with no flavor.

    Chestnut/plantain/lucuma flours add carbs and a subtle sweet flavor, but are expensive.

    Oat fiber comes up a lot as a GF baking boon but I haven't tried it yet. I'm generally unenthused about seed fibers so maize and amaranth wouldn't be my first choices either.
    36//6'3"/180

    My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

  5. #5
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    I like nut flours... but it can't be good to eat that many.

    nice run downPickle!

  6. #6
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    "Maize" is the British word for what we call "corn" in the US. In the UK they use "corn flour" to mean what we call "cornstarch". I would definitely skip that one. No way is it paleo.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    "Maize" is the British word for what we call "corn" in the US. In the UK they use "corn flour" to mean what we call "cornstarch". I would definitely skip that one. No way is it paleo.
    I've never heard anyone use the word maize in the UK. I actually thought it was the other way around!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CavemanJoe View Post
    I've never heard anyone use the word maize in the UK. I actually thought it was the other way around!
    I don't think you consume as much corn as we do here. But isn't it true that the word "corn" can be a general term that includes any cereal grains?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I don't think you consume as much corn as we do here. But isn't it true that the word "corn" can be a general term that includes any cereal grains?
    We call them by their specific names. Corn is corn, wheat is wheat etc.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CavemanJoe View Post
    We call them by their specific names. Corn is corn, wheat is wheat etc.
    For instance, "corned beef" is called that because it traditionally was made by packing meat in grains of salt the size of cereal grains.

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