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Thread: Flour alternatives primal or not...? page 2

  1. #11
    CarbDodger's Avatar
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    arrowroot is excellent for treating diarrhoea so don't overdo it as it can obviously cause constipation!

  2. #12
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    If you're not particularly sensitive, then just cutting the gluten should be good. I would not recommend having flour substitutes every day, but once in a while is probably fine.

  3. #13
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    My mother used to thicken things with arrowroot because she thought it was healthier than cornstarch. I remember going through a period of time when all the sauces were bitter from it and flavorless because she didn't season.

    I make a gluten-free flour substitute from rice flour alone: 1 part sweet rice flour and 4 parts white rice flour, both purchased sealed in plastic bags in an Asian store. It works for most non-yeast pastries, cookies, and cake-type things, as well as thickening sauces. But not for bread-like things.

    Baking qualities would be improved by the addition of xanthan gum, but I find that unacceptable.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    "Maize" is the British word for what we call "corn" in the US. In the UK they use "corn flour" to mean what we call "cornstarch". I would definitely skip that one. No way is it paleo.
    Yeah, maize is a synonym for corn, and you should really stay away from it. There's a good chance that any corn item you buy is going to be made from genetically modified, Round-up Ready, corn. And long-term consumption of Round-up Ready corn has been shown to cause cancer in rats, especially breast cancer in female rats. Even organic corn could be contaminated with the transgene. It's just not worth the risk, IMO. We could debate all day long over whether rat studies can be applied to humans, but, in the end, I just really don't want breast cancer.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    I have never tried substitute flours with yest dough, like pizzas, because Chaco mentioned they all need gluten to develop
    I have made gluten-free yeast bread with GF all-purpose flour and it rises just the same. The recipe was on the back of the AP GF flour blend. The brand is Better Batter; made with rice, potato and tapioca. I dislike the xanthan gum, though and prefer to make my own blends. I heard gelatin can be used in baking but I'm not sure if it always works. Perhaps egg white would be a better binder.
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by j3nn View Post
    I heard gelatin can be used in baking but I'm not sure if it always works.
    I used gelatin once. It gave a good texture to the bread, but it melts when you try to toast it. Best eaten cold.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I used gelatin once. It gave a good texture to the bread, but it melts when you try to toast it. Best eaten cold.
    Noted!!
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  8. #18
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    Maize - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Maize (pron.: /ˈmeɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays L, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), known in some English-speaking countries as corn, is a large grain plant domesticated by indigenous peoples in Mesoamerica in prehistoric times. The leafy stalk produces ears which contain the grain, which are seeds called kernels. Maize kernels are used in cooking as a starch. The Olmec and Mayans cultivated it in numerous varieties throughout Mesoamerica, cooked, ground or processed through nixtamalization. Beginning about 2500 BC, the crop spread through much of the Americas.[1] The region developed a trade network based on surplus and varieties of maize crops. After European contact with the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries, explorers and traders carried maize back to Europe and introduced it to other countries. Maize spread to the rest of the world because of its ability to grow in diverse climates. Sugar-rich varieties called sweet corn are usually grown for human consumption, while field corn varieties are used for animal feed and as chemical feedstocks.

    Maize is the most widely grown grain crop throughout the Americas,[2] with 332 million metric tons grown annually in the United States alone. Approximately 40% of the crop — 130 million tons — is used for corn ethanol.[3] Transgenic maize (genetically modified corn) made up 85% of the maize planted in the United States in 2009.[4]
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I don't think you consume as much corn as we do here. But isn't it true that the word "corn" can be a general term that includes any cereal grains?
    We call them by their specific names. Corn is corn, wheat is wheat etc.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by CavemanJoe View Post
    We call them by their specific names. Corn is corn, wheat is wheat etc.
    For instance, "corned beef" is called that because it traditionally was made by packing meat in grains of salt the size of cereal grains.

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