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  1. #11
    Paleobird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    Explains how we survive winter.

    Additionally, excess fat soluble vitamins get stored in your body fat. If you start shedding that, you reacquire those vitamins.

    Paleobird: Not so sure about all pre-ag non-meats being bad. I've found a few wild things around here that were tasty. Not fully disagreeing with you, though. We have had a tendency to make things sweeter as time's gone on. Try wild carrot sometime - you might call it "Queen Anne's Lace". At least, we do here.
    I was thinking of things like wild broccoli which is just a fibrous bushy thing. The top part that we call the florets is almost non-existant in it. Also wild lettuce is a spiky fibrous thing. I think plant storage organs (roots and tubers) such as your wild carrots were probably a larger part of the paleolithic diet than anything green. They are much more nutrient dense.

    Also fruit but that would only have been seasonally and/or regionally available.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    I was thinking of things like wild broccoli which is just a fibrous bushy thing. The top part that we call the florets is almost non-existant in it. Also wild lettuce is a spiky fibrous thing. I think plant storage organs (roots and tubers) such as your wild carrots were probably a larger part of the paleolithic diet than anything green. They are much more nutrient dense.

    Also fruit but that would only have been seasonally and/or regionally available.
    You will have to qualify "wild broccoli" for me; what my googling has found is rather inconsistent. Understand your meaning, though. I looked up wild lettuce. That's apparently the thing I've called "tall weed" all my life. Solves that mystery. There's a bunch sprouting all over the place here, might have to try and chew on some and see what that's like. Also, you can apparently smoke it for a high. Huh.

    Looks like this: http://massnrc.org/pests/pestFAQshee...ld_Lettuce.jpg

    I don't know about wild carrots per se (it's like biting into a block of wood in my experience, but it had already bolted so maybe that was the problem), but I'm inclined to agree that starchy bits probably contributed a good deal to the diet. They're simply more massive and more efficient to gather. Like meat - animals are (generally) more massive and nutrient dense (fat!) than anything else you can gather easily. That said, greens are probably a good part of the diet as well. Tubers are also seasonally available. There's a bunch of things in "greens" that aren't in tubers and roots. Coincidentally, a lot of roots/tubers come attached to leafy things...two for one deal!

    What surprises me is that we're not tree-leaf eaters (for the most part). Or maybe we are, and we just don't (except I eat tea leaves). If you've ever seen "Quest for Fire", there's a scene that uses tree-leaf eating as a show for human omnivorous capacity as a means of survival.

    I wonder how many flowers are supposed to be edible. Those puffy purple flowers that look kind of like thistle around here were something I'd eat as a kid.

    Which reminds me, I need to start a thread regarding wild plant IDing.

    M.

    EDIT: Added a picture, off to go research things.
    Last edited by MEversbergII; 05-16-2013 at 09:21 AM.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    What surprises me is that we're not tree-leaf eaters (for the most part). Or maybe we are, and we just don't (except I eat tea leaves). If you've ever seen "Quest for Fire", there's a scene that uses tree-leaf eating as a show for human omnivorous capacity as a means of survival.
    Tree leaves are tough and fibrous. The nutrition in them is low, and it would require a huge amount of consumption and a digestive system that could extract that nutrition from the cellulose.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Also fruit but that would only have been seasonally and/or regionally available.
    That's what I used to think. And while it is true for those of us in temperate climates, in Africa where our ancestors evolved, fruit is available year round. Denise Minger did a post on wild and ancient fruit that changed my mind.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    Tree leaves are tough and fibrous. The nutrition in them is low, and it would require a huge amount of consumption and a digestive system that could extract that nutrition from the cellulose.[Like a gorilla hindgut]

    That's what I used to think. And while it is true for those of us in temperate climates, in Africa where our ancestors evolved, fruit is available year round. Denise Minger did a post on wild and ancient fruit that changed my mind.
    What denise says is true of that area but most of us were not in that area for most of our evolution once we came down out of the trees (as J Stanton puts it). The other thing that Nora Gedgaudas points out in Primal Body Primal Mind is that, while much of the world was undergoing ice ages, the equatorial regions would have been ravaged by drought leaving even warmer climates scarce on plant life.

    This is an interesting piece about many of out modern day produce favorites. So many of the things we think of as veggies are human inventions.
    The First Broccoli: Where Does Broccoli Come From? | A Moment of Science - Indiana Public Media
    Last edited by Paleobird; 05-16-2013 at 12:44 PM.

  5. #15
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    I'd like to get a list of "natural" greens we can eat. Might give us some more data to connect with our past.

    M.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    I'd like to get a list of "natural" greens we can eat. Might give us some more data to connect with our past.
    I got one of these babies to pull dandelions out of the lawn and garden. It is the most fun lawn tool you could ever imagine. You will be tempted to carry it around the neighborhood removing dandelions from your neighbor's lawns, too.

    You can eat dandelion leaves.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I got one of these babies to pull dandelions out of the lawn and garden. It is the most fun lawn tool you could ever imagine. You will be tempted to carry it around the neighborhood removing dandelions from your neighbor's lawns, too.

    You can eat dandelion leaves.
    Roasted dandelion roots make a good tea.

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