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    Omni's Avatar
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    Caloric restriction for Health and Longevity

    This is a review paper of a number of studies on caloric restriction and longevity on long lived primates, the effect has been seen from the humble round worm C Elegans to fruit fly and many studies on rodents.
    These particular studies were started over 30 years ago and research has been continuing, they have found the SIRT1 gene plays a significant role and is upregulated with caloric restriction and hence there has been a race to find chemicals to stimulate this, resveratrol from grape and berry skins is one of these, hence red wine and health, but other research on SIRT1 indicates there is much more to it than just stimulating SIRT1, like everything man is looking for the easy way out, "eat plenty of crap then pop the longevity pill", i think there is only one way and that is CR.
    I'd predict that upregulating SIRT1 in the presence of caloric surplus would likely have dire consequences, it's there to keep us alive through caloric shortages.

    At bottom is a whole lot of SIRT1 links

    Calorie Restriction and Aging in Nonhuman Primates

    Effects of CR on Lifespan

    The NIA, Wisconsin, and Maryland studies are still under way, so it is too early to identify the precise extent of CR on the animal’s lifespan. However, interim analysis of the Wisconsin study data indicate that control animals at any time had three times the rate of death from an age-related cause compared to the CR monkeys (Colman et al. 2009)—median survival of the control animals has been approximately 27 years, whereas more than 50% of CR monkeys are still living at 31 years of age (all-cause mortality). Interim analysis of the NIA data indicated that twice as many controls as CR monkeys have died of age-related causes (Mattison et al. 2003). And in the Maryland program the median survival for all ad libitum–fed monkeys is approximately 25 years and for the eight CR animals 31 years (Bodkin et al. 2003). Based on the data from these three studies, it seems likely that lifespan will be extended for the monkeys undergoing CR.

    Lessons Learned and Future Directions.

    CR is the only intervention that has been consistently shown to reduce the incidence, delay the onset, and slow the progression of age-related disease and extend lifespan in short-lived species. The studies described in this article indicate that these effects also occur in long-lived nonhuman primates and suggest that similar mechanisms would be operative in humans.
    SIRT1 gene suppresses longevity
    The Sirt1 Gene Promotes Insulin Secretion in Accord with Diet
    Resveratrol Interacts with SIRT1 Gene for Health Benefits | SciTech Daily
    SIRT1 gene important for memory
    New study validates longevity pathway: Findings identify universal mechanism for activating anti-aging pathway
    New experiments clarify the role of SIRT1 in HD - or do they? - HDBuzz - Huntington

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    KimchiNinja's Avatar
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    How did they feed the monkies though?

    If they fed them crap and gave one group 30% less crap that would explain a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KimchiNinja View Post
    How did they feed the monkies though?

    If they fed them crap and gave one group 30% less crap that would explain a lot.
    This may shed some light on that issue: Gary Taubes MS

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    Some info on this is in Dr. Michael Mosley's book, The Fast Diet. He also did a BBC documentary last fall where he interviews some of the scientists who are researching fasting/calorie restricting and longevity of life. Very interesting stuff!
    *~Sara~*

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexkx3 View Post
    This may shed some light on that issue: Gary Taubes MS
    Thanks for sharing.

    I feel like eating crap and eating too much (of anything), all of it puts extra burden on the body's internal workings. All this extra work discourages our body's ability to adapt to stressors later in life, thus leading to premature aging.

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    Omni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimchiNinja View Post
    How did they feed the monkies though?

    If they fed them crap and gave one group 30% less crap that would explain a lot.
    This point to some degree is irrelevant as both groups had the same Macro ratios, the restricted monkey's did get less crap, but also less calories to deal with that crap, so ultimately it was the calorie restriction which was the only significant difference between the two groups.

    The intake of the restricted group was governed by the intake of the free eating control group, as controls reduced their intake naturally, then restricted group intake was adjusted to maintain the 30% difference.

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    Interesting.

    I'd like to feed one group monkey-paleo at +30 calories, and one group monkey-sad at -30. Same macros but different food qualities. If the group that pigs out on quality food lives longer that screws their whole theory on eating less.

    Americans don't think food quality is tangible though, so they'd never think to do such a study.

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    This is bull. I've had nothing but health problems since I started restricting calories 15 years ago.

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    I think there is a qualitative difference between restricting calories to 10-20% below CW and an anorexic approach of eating almost nothing. One is about defining health differently. The other is about someone who feels out of control taking control of a single thing (food intake).

    One problem is that we put calorie counting and CW re: low fat, too many carbs, etc., all in one basket. A person can count calories, and even eat lower calories than is currently acceptable, and if done in a logical way, be healthy.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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    The main thing is to restrict "excessive calories", not just to restrict calories in general.

    "Excessive calories" are calories with no physiological, functional, nutritional purpose.

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