Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Receding Gums & Electric Toothbrush/Waterpik

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1
    Shop Now
    Floss your teeth every day. Waterpiks are great to supplement flossing. Waterpiks do not take the place of flossing. You can start on the lowest setting and work up. They will not put excessive pressure on your gums to damage your tissues. Add a little listerine if you want to kill more bacteria. No matter what toothbrush you use, make sure it is extra soft. Brush in circular motion gently. (No horizontal back and forth. This can wear away gum tissue and teeth in the long run.) Chronic clenching and grinding can cause recession, but will not cause periodontal disease(inflamed gums and bone loss around teeth). Wear a night guard to protect against tooth wear and recession. I have seen inflamed gums greatly improve if gluten is removed, inflammation in the body is decreased, hormones become more balanced, stress is decreased.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4

    receding gums

    It seems like we are on the same boat. I had the same problem as yours. My friend suggested me to see as they are the best and experienced dentist Maloney Stephen M Dmd in our local and I started using soft brush recommended by my dentist. He also suggested me to eat fresh fruits to reduce receding gums.


    http://www.wellness.com/dir/2052707/...-stephen-m-dmd

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1
    Gum recession is often caused by the Streptococcus Mutans bacteria. This bacteria thrives on sugar and excretes plaque & acid in the process. If the tool you are going to use to fight this bacteria and the plaque/acid it leaves behind, is abrasion you are fighting a battle you will never win. In our opinion electric toothbrushes should only be used by people with mobility issues. That is what they were originally created for. There are for too many highly abrasive toothpastes on the market and an electric toothbrush creates the damage faster.

    The Streptococcus Mutans bacteria love Xylitol even more than they like sugar. Unfortunately it is unable to use Xylitol as a fuel source after it gorges on it and soon dies of starvation. Now you have addressed the source of the problem instead of fighting the symptom.

    There is a lot of Xylitol toothpastes on the market. There is even one that can be used with your water flosser so you deliver Xylitol into your gum pockets where the most serious damage begins, like bone loss, which causes your gums to recede.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    61
    I've just started reading up on CoQ10 and gingivitis. Some interesting studies for both ingesting and topical application.

    Evaluation of Co-Q10 anti-gingivitis effect on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized controlled clinical trial. - PubMed - NCBI

    I have a Phillips Sonicare at the advice of my dentist. I use the sensitive heads because I press too hard. I also switched to flossing at night vs in the morning at their suggestion.

  5. #15
    Shop Now
    I've had good luck with adding a K2 supplement to my diet. Just couldn't bring myself to eat natto.
    http://www.thorne.com/products/dp/vitamin-k2-liquid

    I have pretty irregular brushing and flossing habits and the last dentist appointment the doc commented how little plac and calculus buildup I had. They said that cleaning and fluoride treatment was optional. I opted for the cleaning anyway and it was much less painful then last time, less digging under the gum line. I was too embarrassed to tell the doc that I brush maybe once a day and almost never floss.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •