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Thread: Think your wightloss journey is tough? better think again page

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    jaczor's Avatar
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    Think your wightloss journey is tough? better think again

    Primal Fuel
    Many of you probably read or saw his story on TV, a guy named David Smith changed his life around,lost over 400lbs and became fit,here's a picture of his before/after:



    Amazing, right? what most of you don't know (like me, up until yesterday) is that this dude gained almost all of it back! can you imagine? going through all the hardships losing the weight, then facing multiple surgeries to fix all the loose skin he had, only to end up getting fat again a few years later.

    He overcame the physical hurdles of loosing weight but not the psychological ones.

    After I found out about it, I became demotivated, if this guy managed to become fit and then threw it all away in a few years, what chance do I have when I'm not even at the fit stage yet?? But then it hit me: this guy went through all that crap, is back at over 500lbs and he is willing to try again, I only have to loose a small fraction of that, if he can find motivation I sure as hell can.

    It also showed me that losing weight is actually not about losing the weight, that's half the battle, the toughest part is the life changing habits you need to keep the weight off, that's what I like about paleo, it's something I see myself doing for the rest of my life, without feeling like I'm missing out on good tasting food or on being happy.

    Here are a couple of videos, one from when he lost it and one when he gained it back and started again:





    Any thoughts?

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    When you eat paleo you don't have to control your biological urge to eat. Nor is losing weight an epic battle of willpower. You just eat good delicious food, you feel mentally and physically great, your bodyweight normalizes and you can live life in peace without the struggle against your appetite controlling everything. That's my experience anyway.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

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    stormcrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaczor View Post
    After I found out about it, I became demotivated, if this guy managed to become fit and then threw it all away in a few years, what chance do I have when I'm not even at the fit stage yet?? But then it hit me: this guy went through all that crap, is back at over 500lbs and he is willing to try again, I only have to loose a small fraction of that, if he can find motivation I sure as hell can.

    My question is why does someone else's success or failure contribute to your motivation? Motivation needs to be internal, not external.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stormcrow View Post
    My question is why does someone else's success or failure contribute to your motivation? Motivation needs to be internal, not external.
    Perhaps the OP meant inspriational, not motivational. I certainly find the Friday success stories inspriational.

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    eKatherine's Avatar
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    The problem is with the nature of "dieting". Before people even start, they think that losing weight is the hard part, and after they lose all the weight as quickly as possible, that it will be easy to maintain their ideal body weight, even that losing as quickly as possible will make it even easier to get on with maintenance.

    There is an assumption that the dieter will permanently adopt the diet or something similar to it and seamlessly transition into lifelong healthy eating habits. The fact is people enjoy losing weight so much that during the rapid weight loss phase, they may imagine that doing this will be easy. They repeat it as a mantra, "it's not about dieting, it's about lifestyle change".

    Even exercise is done for the purpose of losing weight, not because it is an activity they like. The belief is that certain types and volumes of exercise are necessary and inexorably lead to specific weight loss. This is endlessly parroted on diet sites and by diet and exercise gurus, even there is no science behind the claim. When they get injured, as everybody eventually does, or come to realize that it's their food intake they must continue to control forever, they naturally become discouraged to find they will be on a diet they don't like for the rest of their lives if they want to stay thin.

    I'm sure most of us have dieted and remember the rut, even if we were never this obese.

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    There's something like a 95% failure rate for long term weight loss success. Losing weight is the easy part, keeping it off is the real challenge. I think most people focus on losing the weight and hitting goal, but have no plan of action for afterward. It takes a few months to lose the weight, but you have to mantain it for the rest of your life-20, 30, 40+ years. Plus in maintenance there's no motivational 'rushes' of a new, lower number on the scale, smaller clothes, compliments from people who see you losing etc. In a nutshell-maintenance is boring and with that comes laziness and the mental game of 'a little splurge won't hurt', which leads to a snowball of overindulgence and weight re-gain.

    As I approached my goal weight, I started looking for maintenance resources. Found out very quickly there is pretty much none. No books, websites, blogs etc are devoted to maintenance. So people come off the 'high' of losing the weight, are now released from the diet leash, and have no idea what to do. As someone who's been in maintenance about a month and a half, I can attest to how damn difficult it is. It's a constant mental struggle of second guessing what I'm eating, worrying about an influx in the scale etc. It's pretty exhausting. Hopefully the longer I do it the more comfortable I'll get with it.
    Last edited by mom23kids; 05-08-2013 at 10:45 AM.
    *~Sara~*

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    eKatherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mom23kids View Post
    There's something like a 95% failure rate for long term weight loss success. Losing weight is the easy part, keeping it off is the real challenge. I think most people focus on losing the weight and hitting goal, but have no plan of action for afterward. It takes a few months to lose tbe weight, ut you have to mantain it for the rest of your life. Plus in maintenance there's no motivational 'rushes' of a new, lower number on the scale, smaller clothes, compliments from people who see you losing etc. In a nutshell-maintenance is boring and with that comes laziness and the mental game of 'a little splurge won't hurt', which leads to a snowball of overindulgence and weight re-gain.

    As I approached my goal weight, I started looking for maintenance resources. Found out very quickly there is pretty much none. No books, websites, blogs etc are devoted to maintenance. So people come off the 'high' of losing the weight, are now released from the diet leash, and have no idea what to do. As someone who's been in maintenance about a month and a half, I can attest to how damn difficult it is. It's a constant mental struggle of second guessing what I'm eating, worrying about an influx in the scale etc. It's pretty exhausting. Hopefully the longer I do it the more comfortable I'll get with it.
    Follow the money. There's no money to be made in maintenance. The money is in diet and exercise programs that give the illusion that the reason they fail is the dieter's fault. Then the dieter will pick another program and spend even more money.

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    Something like 95% of all people who lose substantial weight will regain it within five years. No matter whether you lose it fast or slow, healthfully or non-healthfully. Which is why yoyo dieting is so prevalent. Maybe it will be different for paleo/primal. I hope so.

    oops was posting at the same time.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    Follow the money. There's no money to be made in maintenance. The money is in diet and exercise programs that give the illusion that the reason they fail is the dieter's fault. Then the dieter will pick another program and spend even more money.
    So true! The book, Rethinking Thin by Gina Kolata, looks at the history of the dieting industry and it really is about money.
    *~Sara~*

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    eKatherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    Something like 95% of all people who lose substantial weight will regain it within five years. No matter whether you lose it fast or slow, healthfully or non-healthfully. Which is why yoyo dieting is so prevalent. Maybe it will be different for paleo/primal. I hope so.
    Here's my take on that. The <5% of dieters who lose the weight and keep it off have accidentally found a "diet" that agrees with them enough that they can stay on it with minor tweaks. Quite possibly they enjoy being obsessive about counting calories or otherwise keeping close control over their intake. And the successful weight-loss diet may be one of the first diets they attempted. I think once a person has been on even a small number of diets, their metabolism and eating habits have been so negatively affected that it will prevent future diets from working for them.

    Or maybe repeated failure is a sign that dieting won't work for these people.

    It's the same with smoking. Some people give it up on the first try and don't find it hard. Others give it up and go back repeatedly, searching from program to program for something that will work for them.

    I doubt I could ever be entirely a free-eating person. I will need to maintain some level of awareness. But doing what I am doing now takes far less effort than a lot of the people who are being studied for having permanantly lost weight go through every day.
    Last edited by eKatherine; 05-08-2013 at 10:54 AM.

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