Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 46

Thread: Is fructose bad for brain inflammation? page 2

  1. #11
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by canuck416 View Post
    F1,6BP is a byproduct of glycolysis caused by the breakdown of glucose. Not really the same thing as eating fructose.
    Not the same thing at all.
    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    I only read the topic title, and was answering a general question.
    In other words you just quoted the nearest available thing that sounded close and didn't even understand what it meant. Got it.

  2. #12
    Derpamix's Avatar
    Derpamix is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    5,361
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Not the same thing at all.
    In other words you just quoted the nearest available thing that sounded close and didn't even understand what it meant. Got it.
    Except I did. Read it again until it makes sense if you have to. Read both links. I stated fructose has pathways that it bypasses.

    Fructose.Has.Pathways.That.It.Bypasses.

    There are times that glucose is converted into lactate when glucose or fructose or ketones need to be placed somewhere else. This usually happens in a glycogen depleted state.

    Now read the second link for this to make sense.
    Last edited by Derpamix; 05-07-2013 at 09:41 PM.
    Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant

  3. #13
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    Except I did. Read it again until it makes sense if you have to. Read both links. I stated fructose has pathways that it bypasses.

    Fructose.Has.Pathways.That.It.Bypasses.

    There are times that glucose is converted into lactate when glucose or fructose or ketones need to be placed somewhere else. This usually happens in a glycogen depleted state.

    Now read the second link for this to make sense.
    I did read and understand both links and nowhere does it even come remotely close to saying that eating sugar has an anti-convulsant effect. It said that one byproduct of glycolysis isolated and artificially introduced (in a study with artificially induced seizures in rats) tended to move the metabolism of glucose toward the pentose phosphate pathway which is neuroprotective. It's also exactly what ketosis does naturally.

    There is a decades long history of ketosis as a successful treatment for epilepsy. Your logic doesn't have a leg to stand on.

  4. #14
    Derpamix's Avatar
    Derpamix is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    5,361
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    I did read and understand both links and nowhere does it even come remotely close to saying that eating sugar has an anti-convulsant effect. It said that one byproduct of glycolysis isolated and artificially introduced (in a study with artificially induced seizures in rats) tended to move the metabolism of glucose toward the pentose phosphate pathway which is neuroprotective. It's also exactly what ketosis does naturally.

    There is a decades long history of ketosis as a successful treatment for epilepsy. Your logic doesn't have a leg to stand on.
    I said that first with ketones, already, that the mechanism of action was similar. I said both are documented for a reason.

    Then if you did, I don't know what point you're trying to make here. I never said that about sugar, if you feed an epileptic with glucose during a seizure the seizure will probably worsen due to the inefficient use of glucose causing the brain to fill with lactate. It's correcting this and making glucose efficient giving the ability for ATP to create co2 that causes seizures to improve. Read L.B. Gladden's paper about lactate shuttle.

    The point was, it's not fructose, fructose is protective and can bypass this via different pathways as shown in link 2.
    Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant

  5. #15
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Once again F1, 6BP=/=fructose

  6. #16
    Derpamix's Avatar
    Derpamix is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    5,361
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Once again F1, 6BP=/=fructose
    ...What? fructose-6-phosphate is fructose phosphorylated on 6 carbon, using magnesium as a cofactor for phosphofructokinase, it converts that into fructose 1'6-b

    It is fructose... These are the various pathways I was talking about.
    Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant

  7. #17
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by cori93437 View Post
    Yeah... I just finished reading. That isn't JUST fructose.
    Try talking to a specialist in the field about it... sugars, even fructose (from eating fruit) in large doses can cause problems with inflammation/anti-inflammatory cascades and neuro-excitability that is bad news.
    Derp, don't try to tell Cori and I (one with an inflammatory brain condition and one with epilepsy) that we don't know what we are talking about when it comes to sugar and the brain.

  8. #18
    cori93437's Avatar
    cori93437 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    central FL
    Posts
    6,719
    Once again... folks with normal brains, pretty much the lot of you, enjoy your sugars from whole natural foods. YUM.

    But, folks with brain issues, maybe consult an actual doctor (i.e. specialist in the field of your brain issue) and deal with your own particular situation via that route and some n=1!
    I personally can have some bad results from over consuming any sugars... be it glucose, fructose, or similarly acting alcohol.
    However I still indulge a bit on occasion...

    Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

    "Not all of the people, not all of the time."
    ^^One of my favorite quotes from an old prof of mine.
    Most things fit in that bin.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


  9. #19
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    ...What? fructose-6-phosphate is fructose phosphorylated on 6 carbon, using magnesium as a cofactor for phosphofructokinase, it converts that into fructose 1'6-b
    It is fructose... These are the various pathways I was talking about.
    It's not fructose. It's a byproduct of glycolysis.
    Glycolysis literally means "splitting sugars." See step 3.

    10 Steps of Glycolysis

    Step 1
    The enzyme hexokinase phosphorylates (adds a phosphate group to) glucose in the cell's cytoplasm. In the process, a phosphate group from ATP is transferred to glucose producing glucose 6-phosphate.

    Step 2
    The enzyme phosphoglucoisomerase converts glucose 6-phosphate into its isomer fructose 6-phosphate. Isomers have the same molecular formula, but the atoms of each molecule are arranged differently.

    Step 3
    The enzyme phosphofructokinase uses another ATP molecule to transfer a phosphate group to fructose 6-phosphate to form fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate.

    Step 4
    The enzyme aldolase splits fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate into two sugars that are isomers of each other. These two sugars are dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde phosphate.

    Step 5
    The enzyme triose phosphate isomerase rapidly inter-converts the molecules dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde phosphate. Glyceraldehyde phosphate is removed as soon as it is formed to be used in the next step of glycolysis.

    Step 6
    The enzyme triose phosphate dehydrogenase serves two functions in this step. First the enzyme transfers a hydrogen (H-) from glyceraldehyde phosphate to the oxidizing agent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to form NADH. Next triose phosphate dehydrogenase adds a phosphate (P) from the cytosol to the oxidized glyceraldehyde phosphate to form 1, 3-bisphosphoglycerate. This occurs for both molecules of glyceraldehyde phosphate produced in step 5.

    Step 7
    The enzyme phosphoglycerokinase transfers a P from 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate to a molecule of ADP to form ATP. This happens for each molecule of 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate. The process yields two 3-phosphoglycerate molecules and two ATP molecules.

    Step 8
    The enzyme phosphoglyceromutase relocates the P from 3-phosphoglycerate from the third carbon to the second carbon to form 2-phosphoglycerate.

    Step 9
    The enzyme enolase removes a molecule of water from 2-phosphoglycerate to form phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP). This happens for each molecule of 2-phosphoglycerate.

    Step 10
    The enzyme pyruvate kinase transfers a P from PEP to ADP to form pyruvic acid and ATP. This happens for each molecule of PEP. This reaction yields 2 molecules of pyruvic acid and 2 ATP molecules.

    source:10 Steps of Glycolysis

  10. #20
    Derpamix's Avatar
    Derpamix is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    5,361
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Derp, don't try to tell Cori and I (one with an inflammatory brain condition and one with epilepsy) that we don't know what we are talking about when it comes to sugar and the brain.
    Perhaps you think sugar is bad for your brain, but you didn't provide any evidence to show it's bad for the brain in general. I even explained how sugar could harm people under certain situations. Those with impaired glucose pathways won't do well eating just glucose all at once, but fructose is something different.

    There is more than one way to fix every problem, the human body is amazingly resourceful.

    And I'll stop saying you don't know what you're talking about when you stop trying to belittle my intelligence and call me stupid at every turn.
    Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •