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Thread: Low-carb strength training page 2

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimchiNinja View Post
    Yeah but you can also NOT eat carbs and perform at the gym.

    It's pretty awesome.
    Yeah you don't need the gym either...get outside to do your strength training...its awesome.

  2. #12
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    Strength training... that to me is different than "bulking up." Big muscles and strength tend to be different states and different goals. I eat very few carbs and in the gym my goal is strength and definition. That's easy low-carbing it. If I want to look like the Hulk then a different diet is in order.

  3. #13
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    the guy is eating 50-60g of carbs a day, and you are saying that is sufficient for intense strength training?

    what kind of workout are you doing where that is sufficient

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Deane View Post
    Strength training... that to me is different than "bulking up." Big muscles and strength tend to be different states and different goals. I eat very few carbs and in the gym my goal is strength and definition. That's easy low-carbing it. If I want to look like the Hulk then a different diet is in order.
    I've wondered about that, is it really paramount to over eat to gain strength? I can see over eating to be able to gain muscle size but just to get to somewhat stronger with a medium to minimal amount strength training I'm not sure you have to over eat for that. I don't know the answer to this since I'm orientated to a endurance exercise lifestyle but try to just get a bit of strength training in.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by dabears View Post
    the guy is eating 50-60g of carbs a day, and you are saying that is sufficient for intense strength training?

    what kind of workout are you doing where that is sufficient
    Does it matter how much carbs you eat if your muscles are replenished with glycogen...isn't it just a matter of the time interval between workouts for glycogen replenishment?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockrunner View Post
    I've wondered about that, is it really paramount to over eat to gain strength? I can see over eating to be able to gain muscle size but just to get to somewhat stronger with a medium to minimal amount strength training I'm not sure you have to over eat for that. I don't know the answer to this since I'm orientated to a endurance exercise lifestyle but try to just get a bit of strength training in.
    depending on your definition of "strength" (mine is how much weight you can lift compared to your bodyweight) in order to gain progressive strength, you must increase the size of your muscles (myofibril to be specific). This requires a caloric surplus, period. You cannot expect to gain much feasible strength if you don't provide your body the materials to do so. It doesn't have to be much, and you certainly won't look like a bodybuilder after a few strength training sessions.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockrunner View Post
    Does it matter how much carbs you eat if your muscles are replenished with glycogen...isn't it just a matter of the time interval between workouts for glycogen replenishment?
    well of course, but even working out 3x a week with optimal rest the most you'd have is two days between... if you had post workout carbs (which you should) plus the two days rest worth eating at that level that is still only 150-180g carbs. Considering the average decently built person can store over 300g of glycogen in their muscles and ~50g in the liver, you'd still require a decent refeed once a week or you'd experience a pretty quick downgrade in performance, and over time a complete lack of it.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dabears View Post
    depending on your definition of "strength" (mine is how much weight you can lift compared to your bodyweight) in order to gain progressive strength, you must increase the size of your muscles (myofibril to be specific). This requires a caloric surplus, period. You cannot expect to gain much feasible strength if you don't provide your body the materials to do so. It doesn't have to be much, and you certainly won't look like a bodybuilder after a few strength training sessions.
    My definition of strength is if I can do 4 - 5 reps of my body weight on bench press with less than 10 minutes a week of strength training I'm good and that's plenty. Endurance sports come easy for my body type and weight training is hard...I look for the least amount of time for the most strength increase without over eating.

  9. #19
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    so you are comfortable with your current strength levels and don't want to get stronger (and you won't). if you are ok with that, great!

    bench press btw is probably the least useful indicator of overall strength vs. bodyweight

    I would say pullups from a bodyweight exercise perspective and deadlift/squat (very debatable) from a barbell perspective are the best indicators of overall strength levels vs. bodyweight.

  10. #20
    rockrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dabears View Post
    well of course, but even working out 3x a week with optimal rest the most you'd have is two days between... if you had post workout carbs (which you should) plus the two days rest worth eating at that level that is still only 150-180g carbs. Considering the average decently built person can store over 300g of glycogen in their muscles and ~50g in the liver, you'd still require a decent refeed once a week or you'd experience a pretty quick downgrade in performance, and over time a complete lack of it.
    Yeah I can see how you would have to increase muscle size to increase strength perpetually...but I guess it would come down to "how strong is strong enough" ? I'm way low carb except I have beer cheats on the weekends sometimes...so i have beer re-feeds some weekends.

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