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Thread: Yes, you actually have to allocate time to this... page 2

  1. #11
    eKatherine's Avatar
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    It's a matter of priorities. You do what you have to do, or you re-prioritize. When I worked three jobs I spent half of Sunday fixing vegetables so I would have 3 plates of food to take with me when I left for work in the morning. Otherwise I would have had nothing to eat when I was away from home.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by lemontwisst View Post
    What business is it of yours what somebody else's priorities, and how he chooses to spend his time, are? Who cares?
    Just pointing out how currious it is that proper nutrition gets allocated almost zero time in developed countries.

    Bill Clinton was talking today about how the US can't afford it's annual healthcare spend, how it is higher than any other developed country, totally out of control. He intelligently made the point that it's not about figuring out how we can increase revenues to pay for this healthcare, but rather fixing people's health habits so they don't need the doctor! But of course when it comes to concrete steps of how to fix America's health nobody has any ideas.

    But I have one!

    Oh, and anyone who doesn't like my tone can go pound sand.

  3. #13
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    I think it's a mindset. In conversation with friends yesterday twice the phrase "life's too short" was issued. Once in relation to housework, and again in relation to baking. As in, Life's too short to spend time to cream the butter and sugar, and to sift the flour. It's quicker to melt the butter throw everything together and hope for the best.

    I was a little shocked, and then again when I realised that once I would have agreed that these things were not worth my time. Now I am beginning to look at things differently, more along the lines of "if a job's worth doing, then it's worth doing properly". (Not that I cream butter and sugar, or sift flour any more, but I whip up omelettes, grill bacon, make soup from scratch, pack lunches etc).

    So, yes, I do cook and yes it takes time, time that I see as a worthwhile investment in my health and my family's wellbeing. And life is short, and therefore it's for living, eating, drinking, spending time with family, not guzzling junk and feeling sicker and sicker till the end.

    Bye, gonna go scrub the kitchen floor
    Last edited by Annieh; 05-07-2013 at 02:45 PM.

  4. #14
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    Love this thread. Life is too short to worry about clean floors and a toilet clean enough to eat out of.

    Life isn't too short to make sure you're eating good food. Money money money. For the price of the garbage that is easy and convenient, you can eat healthfully simply by cooking your own food.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  5. #15
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    Anything you want to accomplish that can't be accomplished by pure inertia takes a change in how you prioritize your time. But nobody changes their priorities until it becomes an urgent need driven from within. People who come on here and whine about no time for this or that have simply prioritized other things. I have never liked being fat and unhealthy but it wasn't until the day it became my mission to stop being fat and unhealthy did I ever do anything about it. Not until then did figuring out how to fit all the changes into my life became a fun puzzle to solve rather than an obstacle to complain about.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
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  6. #16
    diene's Avatar
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    Yes, it is all about priorities. I happen to prioritize sleep and workouts over cooking. If I decided to sleep less or skip half my workouts every week, I'd be able to cook more. But guess what, not worth it, especially since I have pretty good alternatives and still do manage to cook from time to time.

    I'd like to have more time to cook, but I don't. I suppose I could work less, but then I wouldn't be able to afford the expensive grass-fed meet, free-range eggs, organic fruits & veggies, organic coconut oil (which I go through jars and jars of--no idea how, but it seems like I got through one jar a month), and other expensive primal foods. This lifestyle is NOT cheap. It's way cheaper to fill up on grains. When I ate oatmeal, I could survive on very little money--oatmeal, eggs (CAFO eggs), bags of (conventional) spinach, and $1.29 cans of sardines. When I subsisted on top ramen and eggs, that was cheaper yet. So in order to afford the healthy food, I have to work more. Thus, less time to cook. There are only 24 hours a day. Something's gotta give.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damiana View Post
    Yeah. What you said is rather patronizing. I'm lucky enough to be as to have time to prepare and cook for myself and my family, but others aren't so lucky. Kids, work, after-school activities, errands, particularly living in a busy metropolitan area, can all significantly cut down on your time.
    Busy is not an excuse. There is a modern misconception that 'good' food takes hours of time and sweat and professional training. There's also a misconception that 'fast food' is actually fast.

    My parents and my grandparents were no less busy, and far fewer of life's conveniences. And they had no choice but to grow, source, preserve, cook and serve food for the same amount of meals while working full time, raising kids and balancing the family budget. Food was simpler, meals were repetitive, and convenience foods were an expensive luxury. (plus they didn't taste as good as the real thing)

    My mom would get up 15 min early and brown some meat before dumping it in the crock pot before heading to work. Dad would season some chicken pieces and throw them on a pan in the oven on the nights he got home first. Sides were baked potatoes or rice and frozen or canned veggies. We kids learned to cook around age 11-12 and we were each assigned a night to cook. Leftovers were frequent. Casseroles were stacked up in the freezer ready to reheat and serve. Nobody LOVED cooking. Planning what we were going to eat and how it was going to get to the table was simply part of managing the household. Often we were eating early or late or in shifts while we worked around sports and activities, but we ate as a family, at a table, almost every night. Drive thru dinners were simply not in our budget. Plus WE KNEW that was crap food for an occasional treat.
    Sandra
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  8. #18
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    Eat one meal a day. It saves time.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandra in BC View Post
    Busy is not an excuse. There is a modern misconception that 'good' food takes hours of time and sweat and professional training. There's also a misconception that 'fast food' is actually fast.

    My parents and my grandparents were no less busy, and far fewer of life's conveniences. And they had no choice but to grow, source, preserve, cook and serve food for the same amount of meals while working full time, raising kids and balancing the family budget. Food was simpler, meals were repetitive, and convenience foods were an expensive luxury. (plus they didn't taste as good as the real thing)

    My mom would get up 15 min early and brown some meat before dumping it in the crock pot before heading to work. Dad would season some chicken pieces and throw them on a pan in the oven on the nights he got home first. Sides were baked potatoes or rice and frozen or canned veggies. We kids learned to cook around age 11-12 and we were each assigned a night to cook. Leftovers were frequent. Casseroles were stacked up in the freezer ready to reheat and serve. Nobody LOVED cooking. Planning what we were going to eat and how it was going to get to the table was simply part of managing the household. Often we were eating early or late or in shifts while we worked around sports and activities, but we ate as a family, at a table, almost every night. Drive thru dinners were simply not in our budget. Plus WE KNEW that was crap food for an occasional treat.
    Quote Originally Posted by smartuko View Post
    Eat one meal a day. It saves time.
    +1 to both. Before McD and Subway, everybody still ate. There are people who change what needs to be changed and people who make excuses about why they can't.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  10. #20
    eKatherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    I think it's a mindset. In conversation with friends yesterday twice the phrase "life's too short" was issued. Once in relation to housework, and again in relation to baking. As in, Life's too short to spend time to cream the butter and sugar, and to sift the flour. It's quicker to melt the butter throw everything together and hope for the best.

    I was a little shocked, and then again when I realised that once I would have agreed that these things were not worth my time. Now I am beginning to look at things differently, more along the lines of "if a job's worth doing, then it's worth doing properly". (Not that I cream butter and sugar, or sift flour any more, but I whip up omelettes, grill bacon, make soup from scratch, pack lunches etc).
    Ah, but it's not about the difference between creaming the butter and sugar together and sifting the flour. It's between making something from basic ingredients vs making a dessert recipe that calls for as many ingredients if not more, one being a cake mix and another a pudding mix. In the end there is no time saved.

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