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Thread: Primal guide to tea... page 3

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    MEversbergII, I hate how that article uses "fermented" instead of oxidized.

    Two COMPLETELY different things!
    Yeah, he discusses that in another article, wherein he decided to use common terms. It drifts away from that in later articles, though.

    M.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    Yeah, he discusses that in another article, wherein he decided to use common terms. It drifts away from that in later articles, though.

    M.
    I realize that using the term "fermented" instead of oxidized is sometimes easier because you have to explain "oxidized" to a lot of folks. But then again, oxidized IS the correct term and calling it "fermented" only perpetuates confusion as to what fermenting really is!

  3. #23
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    I feel your pain.

    M.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    I feel your pain.

    M.
    It's just annoying and doesn't really do anything to help people learn the distinction.

  5. #25
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    Well, like I said, it's on there somewhere. Take this one for example: Tea Guardian: White & Other Lightly Oxidized Teas

    Either case, it's not something worth stressing too much over, as I have. We use incorrect chemistry terms all the time.

    M.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    Well, like I said, it's on there somewhere. Take this one for example: Tea Guardian: White & Other Lightly Oxidized Teas

    Either case, it's not something worth stressing too much over, as I have. We use incorrect chemistry terms all the time.

    M.
    True, but using both terms interchangeably only further creates confusion as to the distinction. Just my opinion but for those who are really trying to learn, it's not helpful.

  7. #27
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    I drink a lot of tea at work, I've tried a lot of flavors (nothing fancy, just what I find in the local grocery stores, both sinenis and herbal), and after a lot of experimentation I've settled on my favorite being green + chamomile (chamomile because it's nice but also for the benefits of apigenin). One bag of green and one bag of plain chamomile in my 20 oz+ glass jar, but I don't heat it to brew it; it's either "brewed" at room temperature on my desk or left in my fridge overnight. Even with the teabags in overnight it never gets too bitter for me; or perhaps the chamomile is smoothing the taste. Really I don't think it's necessary to use heat to brew tea; if you watch it right after you add the tea bags to room temp water, the compounds in the tea start dissolving out and flowing in a stream to the bottom of the glass. It only takes 20 minutes or so for it to brew completely, as far as I can tell, at room temperature. Perhaps doing it this way changes the flavor profile or not all the compounds get dissolved, I don't know; but I think it tastes great, and if I walk to work I really look forward to a swig of my cold tea from my office fridge. Most days I leave it to brew overnight and drink that, then have another batch during the workday, then set it up again for the next day in the fridge before I leave.

    I think people who are addicted to sodas and can't stand just plain water should experiment more with tea, there are lots of fruity ones out there, and they don't need sweetener to taste good; or you can use stevia if you must have the sweet kick.

    My roommate eats restaurant/processed/canned super salty food (chicken and dumplings: 3.5 GRAMS of salt in 1 medium can... wtf), and then she drinks only diuretic full sugar sodas, and so she had to pass some kidney stones recently (salt + diuretic = super concentrated urine). We've been harping on her about drinking water but she hates it so now she has been drinking fruit juice instead of soda some (still full sugar though... /rolleyes but at least it's not caffeinated).
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  8. #28
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    Water haters :|

    There is something catastrophically wrong with you if water is unappealing. Or the water is bad. Actually, I've come across places where the water was thick and bland in the mouth, and turned me off to the stuff for some time. Some bottled water is like this.

    Anyways, back to the subject of tea!

    Wulf, cold infusion is a viable way to go about tea-making, even to tea "snobs" like myself. There are a few greens that are supposedly best when cold infused (room temperature overnight I guess would be the traditional way, unless it was a winter only thing. Or it could be a recent innovation alongside the fridge). I intend to keep a supply of shucha cold infused in the fridge for the summer months coming up. The flavor profile will be different; to my knowing, there's going to be less tannin compounds dissolved into the solution.

    If you are looking to move beyond the tea bag, try experimenting with loose teas infused hot or cold.

    M.

  9. #29
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    at the moment I can't afford good loose teas otherwise I would;

    A note on cold brewing: some teas will normally have bacteria present in them (well, all non-irradiated teas should) and if you allow it to brew too long or leave it at room temperature, this bacteria will start to grow a lot. The indicator of bacterial growth is cloudiness; some tea will brew up perfectly clear, other teas will cause some cloudiness from fine tea particles, but if left too long and you can see a sediment at the bottom that looks yellow or white, that is bacteria and not tea particles. It should not cause illness but it is something to consider; I don't like to leave my teas too long at room temp (more than 6 hours or so), because the bacteria will grow up, to the point you can taste it... not good. Refrigerating slows the bacterial growth quite a bit so that a 24 hour cold brew kept cold should be fine, but longer than that stuff may start to grow; the bacteria grow at cold temperatures also, just slower.

    I find plain water to be refreshing but I do go out of my way to get filtered water. I think water haters are just so used to having their tastes buds constantly stimulated with artificial flavors and sweeteners in the sad/cw diet, that it is just hard for them to accept plain water as not being "bad".
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  10. #30
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    Wulf, that's a misconception. You CAN afford good lose tea.

    If you reinfuse your leaves like I do, then a cup of tea can be as low as 40 cents a cup. That's FAR cheaper than the average American's freaking Starbucks habit.

    You actually can't really expect a second use out of a tea bag, so in the end, they can actually end up costing more. Most people don't calculate for this though because they don't know you can resteep loose leaf teas.

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