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Thread: beef feet

  1. #1
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    beef feet

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    So I discovered beef feet are cheap and have been making broth with them. Very strong flavor, dark color, and solid gel when cool. I used marrow bones before and the broth is yellower and not very solid when gelled. Just curious why this is? What's the difference?

  2. #2
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    You can probably boil them longer before they fall apart. That may be part of it. I shall have to try this. Next time I buy a GF cow quarter I will ask if they have any spare trotters.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlhk View Post
    So I discovered beef feet are cheap and have been making broth with them. Very strong flavor, dark color, and solid gel when cool. I used marrow bones before and the broth is yellower and not very solid when gelled. Just curious why this is? What's the difference?
    I have never used beef feet, but I do add chicken feet to my chicken bone broths for the same reason, to thicken it and create more flavor. I think it has something to do with all the gelatin and connective tissue in the feet, more than other body parts. I will have to try beef feet if I can find them some time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markbt View Post
    I have never used beef feet, but I do add chicken feet to my chicken bone broths for the same reason, to thicken it and create more flavor. I think it has something to do with all the gelatin and connective tissue in the feet, more than other body parts. I will have to try beef feet if I can find them some time.
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    I googled to try to find you a reason. I couldn't find it, only that others have had similar experiences.
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  6. #6
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    Thanks for bringing them (trotters) up. I am going to look for these next time out when time to make a new batch of broth..

  7. #7
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    I cook the bones on low in a slow cooker for 48 hours and they are still a bit hard. The broth has so much body only a small cup is enough!

  8. #8
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    I think the feet and hooves contain more gelatin, which is why it gels more when cooked. Calf's foot jelly, anyone?
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  9. #9
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    Calf's foot jelly and cow heel jelly have been made for centuries and were considered an excellent food for invalids. I use pigs trotters more often as I find them easier to get hold of.

    Recipe for Calf's Feet Jelly (1823) - Mrs. Starch's Scrapbook

    Chickens feet are also a super source of gelatine; a couple added to the bones from a roast chicken make a really good stock, I cook them for about an hour in a pressure cooker with bay leaves and a few black pepper corns.

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