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Thread: Alcohol Impact? page

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    dacec's Avatar
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    Alcohol Impact?

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    I know that the occasional glass of wine is considered appropriate, but what about us beer drinkers? I drink a light beer with only 5 carbs, but I know carbs are not the only issue with weight gain...and yet I keep justifying 'I've been good all day, what's 5 carbs?'

    Can someone explain how beer/alcohol affects weight (and yes I know it is made from grain and contains gluten).

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    Excellent, exactly what I needed to read! thanks for posting that :-)

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    I don't think that link was especially helpful. I think having one beer with only 5 grams of carbs isn't going to be a big deal if you're not gluten intolerant. However, I've been read Kresser a lot lately, and, apparently, a lot of people (30% of Americans) are gluten intolerant and don't know it.

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    It's not the gluten, and it's not *necessarily* the carbs - it's the metabolism of the substrate that is alcohol.

    There are, generally, three macronutrients - fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Alcohol, however, is a fourth - the metabolic breakdown product, acetate, is toxic, so metabolism of that takes precedent over the other three.

    What this means is that it puts the stopper on the oxidation of fat, protein, and carbs for energy- which means they get stored in adipose tissue (fat cells).

    You may want to check this out:
    The truth about alcohol, fat loss and muscle growth | Intermittent fasting diet for fat loss, muscle gain and health
    this great blue world of ours seems a house of leaves, moments before the wind

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    this great blue world of ours seems a house of leaves, moments before the wind
    Beautiful sig!

    Is it possible that some spirits actually speed up the metabolism, as the body tries to rid itself of the poison? Whatever about beer, wine etc., whenever I drink a glass of whiskey I always have the feeling that it gives my metabolism a kick.

    Which is based on nothing but speculation.
    Last edited by YogaBare; 04-25-2013 at 12:01 PM.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    Quote Originally Posted by YogaBare View Post
    Is it possible that some spirits actually speed up the metabolism, as the body tries to rid itself of the poison? Whatever about beer, wine etc., whenever I drink a glass of whiskey I always have the feeling that it gives my metabolism a kick.
    Which is based on nothing but speculation.
    Nope, sorry, bdilla nailed it. You're getting a rush because you're getting drunk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by YogaBare View Post
    Beautiful sig!

    Is it possible that some spirits actually speed up the metabolism, as the body tries to rid itself of the poison? Whatever about beer, wine etc., whenever I drink a glass of whiskey I always have the feeling that it gives my metabolism a kick.
    Yes, the heat many people feel after drinking is due to a certain thermogenic ramping up of the metabolism. How much this count for I don't know, but I know it's around 10 % of ingested calories from carbs. The bad news though, is that many people also enjoy to eat more after drinking...

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    dacec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by serenity View Post
    I don't think that link was especially helpful. I think having one beer with only 5 grams of carbs isn't going to be a big deal if you're not gluten intolerant. However, I've been read Kresser a lot lately, and, apparently, a lot of people (30% of Americans) are gluten intolerant and don't know it.
    The part of the link that explained the metabolism of alcohol was quite helpful. I knew there was more to it than carbs....just didn't know what!

    My hubby and kids are extremely gluten intolerant...I am very well informed on the topic!

    Thanks to everyone else who chimed in. I guess if you are going to indulge at least dont do it on top of a large meal eh?

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    Actually, this thread reminded me of the evening when I distinctly felt / imagined my metabolism increase after a few Jamesons. When I got home I did a quick google search and found the following article: The effect of alcohol on resting metabolic rate

    Which I completely forgot about, until now. Funny that...

    I can't remember its conclusion either
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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