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  1. #11
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogeygolf View Post
    Interesting you say this. What is the theory behind it? I have often wondered if my strict limiting of carbs could hurt in some way.
    You should most definitely strictly limit carbs from sugar, fructose, and refined grains. Starchy carbs can be included by many once they are 'over the hump' of weightloss and more into maintenance. It's very hard to eat more than 100-150g of starchy carbs in a day, so it kind of limits itself. Think 1-2 big servings of potato or rice a day.

    Years of low carbing will induce a form of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a bad deal, because you need insulin sensitivity to effectively clear the glucose from your blood--if you are not eating carbs, your liver makes them, and it still needs cleared out. Insulin does more for you than just clear glucose, however, it also directs amino acids, vitamins, minerals, etc... to where they need to go, assists with leptin sensitivity, and relates to hunger. Being Insulin resistant prevents all the necessary steps from occurring. Unless you want to commit to a TOTAL ketogenic lifestyle, adding in enough starchy carbs per day to run basic metabolism and fuel the brain, approx 100-200g/day, will provide insulin sensitivity and help you with your goals.

    This is all explained well at Perfect Health Diet - A diet for healing chronic disease, restoring youthful vitality, and achieving long life | Perfect Health Diet

  2. #12
    picklepete's Avatar
    picklepete is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    adding in enough starchy carbs per day to run basic metabolism and fuel the brain, approx 100-200g/day, will provide insulin sensitivity and help you with your goals
    And is easier on the wallet.
    Obtaining 100g of glucose from converted quality animal protein is not a privilege available to everyone.

  3. #13
    otzi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by picklepete View Post
    And is easier on the wallet.
    Obtaining 100g of glucose from converted quality animal protein is not a privilege available to everyone.
    What's even better, quality starch contains quality protein! The potato, for instance, is a great source of all the amino acids. It actually has a better amino acid profile than ground beef.

    Compare 1 large potato: Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Potato, baked, flesh and skin, without salt
    Amino Acid Profile: 109, Nutrient Completeness Score: 52

    to 1/2 pound of 75% ground beef: Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Beef, ground, 75% lean meat / 25% fat, crumbles, cooked, pan-browned [hamburger]
    Amino Acid Profile: 59, Nutrient Completeness Score: 35

    Would I recommend getting all your protein from plants? Heck no. Some? Certainly!

  4. #14
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    I also added some fruit in recently which I was not doing last year (except for berries). Mostly bannanas and oranges. Do you like the starchy vegtables better than fruit or are they basically equivalent in terms of maintaining insulin sensitivity?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogeygolf View Post
    I also added some fruit in recently which I was not doing last year (except for berries). Mostly bannanas and oranges. Do you like the starchy vegtables better than fruit or are they basically equivalent in terms of maintaining insulin sensitivity?
    I like to limit fruit to 1 serving a day, which for me is like a banana and a handful of blueberries, or an orange, or something like that. The sugar in fruit is not so bad in limited fashion, but no replacement for the starch found in potatoes, sweet potatoes, rice, or plantains. The starch they provide is readily broken down into glucose you can use immediately. The fructose in fruit has to take a trip through the liver to be used. You could spend a lifetime studying all that, but that's the reason that paleo plans like PB limit fruit.

  6. #16
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    picklepete is online now Senior Member
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    I find both starch and fruit to be self-limiting, provided I stick to whole forms and use them in meals. Water fraction matters!

    I don't think I could eat two potatoes or two nectarines at once without some effort. The hazards of excess just aren't there unless I tread into the canned/dried/juiced/fried form.

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