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Thread: I don't want to use barbells but I want to get strong.

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  1. #1
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    I don't want to use barbells but I want to get strong.

    Ok, I posted a while back asking about the differences between bodyweight and barbells.

    Im a huge fan of bodyweight but wanted to get some more mass and strength.
    I was thinking on using sandbags to achieve this.

    I realise that barbells have the benefit of being able to consistently add weight and the barbell makes everything efficient.
    However, a barbell seems painfully boring and I wanted to do something at home and that's fun.
    I have no desire to be able to deadlift or squat 400+lbs.
    However, I know with a sandbag I can load it up to atleast 100kg and I can dead lift it, squat, shoulder press etc and get all the benefits of "functional strength"

  2. #2
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    You shoudl be fine with that and other forms of odd object lifting.

  3. #3
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    Ever tried kettlebells?

  4. #4
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    Never tried kettlebells :/

  5. #5
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    You say you want to get strong, but you say you don't want to squat or deadlift 400. Seems like you don't really care about getting strong.

    Install a pullup bar, make a 50 lb sandbag, build a slosh tube, buy an ab wheel, make your own version of a suspension trainer, hang a rope in a tree, and go nuts. Get a walker for the elderly and do dips on it. Then you can both have fun making everything and have fun using it.

    My idea of fun at the moment is watching the weight on the barbell increase every week. To each his own.

  6. #6
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    I would say I'm strong, for a 130lbs woman. However, I have decided to increase my strengths by using the barbell. I have no imaginary interest in anything near 400lbs. However, I do want to be able to get to twice my body weight on deadlifts and squats. Right now, using only body weight, kettlebells and bands to build strength, I can do my body weight in both. It isn't very impressive, but considering last week was my first attempt ever, I'll take it. My point is, you can do barbells without extreme "to you" goals.
    Primal since 4/7/2012

    Starting weight 140
    Current weigh 126

    www.jenniferglobensky.blogspot.com

    Jennifer

  7. #7
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    I want to be "functionally" strong and build muscle. Spending years working up to crazy weights with barbells, as I said, seems painfully boring.
    Plus, I really don't see the use of being able to squat that much, what object in life requires that much strength that you wouldn't have someone else just help you?

    My point is, I like to mix it up, and I wanted to get strength and muscle gains from doing stuff other then barbells. Seeing as this is a "primal" website id figure I'd get some good responses, but instead I get the usual Jacking of to Mark Riptoe response.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lockstock View Post
    I want to be "functionally" strong and build muscle. Spending years working up to crazy weights with barbells, as I said, seems painfully boring.
    It sounds like you think that lifting weights using barbells provides no improvement whatever until the exerciser reaches the elite stage. Why would you think that? I have always found improvements noticeable within weeks of taking it up again.

    Plus, I really don't see the use of being able to squat that much, what object in life requires that much strength that you wouldn't have someone else just help you?
    So who says you have to squat "that much" and how much is "that much"?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lockstock View Post
    I want to be "functionally" strong and build muscle. Spending years working up to crazy weights with barbells, as I said, seems painfully boring.
    Plus, I really don't see the use of being able to squat that much, what object in life requires that much strength that you wouldn't have someone else just help you?

    My point is, I like to mix it up, and I wanted to get strength and muscle gains from doing stuff other then barbells. Seeing as this is a "primal" website id figure I'd get some good responses, but instead I get the usual Jacking of to Mark Riptoe response.
    Did you even read my response, or just decide to be offended and react like a child? I gave you several ideas precisely along the lines of what you asked.

    The point isn't just that you might need to lift something alone that weighs 400 lbs. It's that when you can lift 400 lbs, it's a lot easier to lift 70 or 80 lbs several times. Or carry a friend out of a burning building. Whatever.

    As I said, if getting that strong isn't your goal, there's plenty of fun, cool options like those I suggested above.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Did you even read my response, or just decide to be offended and react like a child? I gave you several ideas precisely along the lines of what you asked.

    The point isn't just that you might need to lift something alone that weighs 400 lbs. It's that when you can lift 400 lbs, it's a lot easier to lift 70 or 80 lbs several times. Or carry a friend out of a burning building. Whatever.

    As I said, if getting that strong isn't your goal, there's plenty of fun, cool options like those I suggested above.
    That, and also the fact that barbells represent an ideal environment, which doesn't carryover 100%. What this means is that a 400lb deadlift means that in a framework where you have a comfortable to hold, perfectly symmetrical object, your body can generate enough force against gravity to lift 400lb off the ground. This doesn't mean you can lift a 400lb person, or a 400lb box, because they are more awkwardly shaped, with different weight distribution. However, what it does mean, is that a person with 400lb "ideal environment" strength can be of more help in lifting a 400lb person or box than a person who lifts a lot less.

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