Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: The Caveman Myth?

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    the world
    Posts
    1,938

    The Caveman Myth?

    This article says archeologists have found ancient stores of cultivated grains in Israel which indicate man has been farming for at least 23,000 years:

    Clarity Magazine » Blog Archive The Myth of the Caveman » Clarity Magazine

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Manhattan, NY
    Posts
    4,115
    Sounds in line with the WAPF accounts of history.
    | My (food) Blog | Follow me on Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter |

    “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    the world
    Posts
    1,938
    Last edited by fiercehunter; 04-18-2013 at 09:06 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Charlottesvile, Virginia
    Posts
    68
    The problem is, OF COURSE most of what they'll find is grains and stuff with any large groups of people. Large groups of people can not be nomadic, which meat eating requires as most prey is migratory. Get beyond a couple hundred people in one camp, especially back then, and you couldn't move easily to follow the herd.

    Also, camps for nomadic meat eating societies wouldn't leave much of anything behind. It's the people that stayed in one place for long periods of time that would leave stuff for future generations to find. Grains allow for staying in one place. Grains allow for civilization to grow beyond what would be the norm. However, if we're to think in terms of evolution (which I thought was the point of primal), humans are still adapting to grains in terms of function. Because it is the more readily available source of food, it could be that humans are slowly evolving into grain eaters, but we're not there yet. For the most part, as a species, due to tools and adaptation and long life spans, we evolve very slowly compared to other creatures that we can see evolving...the ones that have hundreds of generations for every generation of ours.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    the world
    Posts
    1,938
    Quote Originally Posted by vtphoenix View Post
    The problem is, OF COURSE most of what they'll find is grains and stuff with any large groups of people. Large groups of people can not be nomadic, which meat eating requires as most prey is migratory. Get beyond a couple hundred people in one camp, especially back then, and you couldn't move easily to follow the herd.

    Also, camps for nomadic meat eating societies wouldn't leave much of anything behind. It's the people that stayed in one place for long periods of time that would leave stuff for future generations to find. Grains allow for staying in one place. Grains allow for civilization to grow beyond what would be the norm. However, if we're to think in terms of evolution (which I thought was the point of primal), humans are still adapting to grains in terms of function. Because it is the more readily available source of food, it could be that humans are slowly evolving into grain eaters, but we're not there yet. For the most part, as a species, due to tools and adaptation and long life spans, we evolve very slowly compared to other creatures that we can see evolving...the ones that have hundreds of generations for every generation of ours.
    We've had 100,000 years to adapt:
    Humans feasting on grains for at least 100,000 years | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Charlottesvile, Virginia
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by fiercehunter View Post
    The problem with saying we've had at least 100,000 years to adapt is the suggestion that grains have been the staple food for ALL OF MANKIND for the past 100,000 years. Finding pockets of grain eating peoples here and there suggest certain groups may have adapted (though whether some of those genes remain and didn't die off from those peoples remains to be seen). Considering how wide spread human civilization is and has become, we could be descended from the meat eating people and are just recently being turned into grain eaters.

    The adaptation (evolution) we see where it occurs rapidly is in species that not only have hundreds of generations a year, but also which have multiple offspring (thousands each generation) where mutations can manifest rapidly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,426
    Quote Originally Posted by fiercehunter View Post
    We've had 100,000 years to adapt.
    And darn if all of us not carrying the gluten tolerance mutation haven't died from it. Yet.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,002
    Quote Originally Posted by fiercehunter View Post
    This article says archeologists have found ancient stores of cultivated grains in Israel which indicate man has been farming for at least 23,000 years:
    Not sure about the 'evidence' they provided, but I'd be interested on their thoughts on Australian Aborigines "discovered" about 200 years by white-man.

    200 years ago - Animal skin clothes, barefoot, spears, stone/wood tools, no clay pots, fire made by stick friction, nomadic life, temporary tree/bark/branch shelters, no farming/gardening, hunting wild animals, spear-fishing, gathering wild fruits/veg, constant slow moving- no grains except maybe occasional gathering a handful of wild stuff.
    Teeth and physical/mental health/strength good.

    Fast forward 200 years - Aboriginal man wears modern cloth clothes, wear's shoes, eats grains and other processed foods including fast food, drinks sodas and alcohols, doesn't move much, modern housing provided, modern medicine/dentistry provided, modern education provided.
    Teeth and physical/mental health/strength very poor.

    Regardless of the health implications since : It seems we have solid evidence that caveman exited as recently as 200 years ago in Australia - Or is this a myth?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    266
    Holy crap, that article was full of New Age pseudoreligious bullsh*t.

    Evidence of grain eating isn't surprising. Humans are opportunistic omnivores, and will eat what they can. 23,000 years ago, some people looked at some ancient wild wheat-type grass and thought "Hmmm, maybe we can eat that." Maybe they didn't have much success with hunting in their area or something. They tried it, and it didn't kill them, so they continued eating it. It certainly wasn't widespread until the beginning of the Neolithic.

    Just because one group seems to have ate some grains a little earlier than previously thought, doesn't mean it's good or healthy.
    "Don't waste your time, or time will waste you."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Washington state
    Posts
    6,919
    Then why was it killing me?
    Steak, eggs, potatoes - fruits, nuts, berries and forage. Coconut milk and potent herbs and spices. Tea instead of coffee now and teeny amounts of kelp daily. Let's see how this does! Not really had dairy much, and gut seems better for it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •