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Thread: How does my thyroid play into weight loss stall, cholesterol, etc? page 2

  1. #11
    otzi's Avatar
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    That's a boatload of supplements. I'd quit them all, except Vit D and Vit K, and start over, try to get all those things from food--it's very do-able!

    Eat fish every day, eggs quite often, grass-fed butter, kale, spinach, cheese, almonds, brazil nuts (1-2/day), seaweed, etc... learn to source vitamins and minerals through food. Lots of the supps you take are synthetic forms of the real deal and block the receptor if it does encounter real food. Just my opinion!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    That's a boatload of supplements. I'd quit them all, except Vit D and Vit K, and start over, try to get all those things from food--it's very do-able!

    Eat fish every day, eggs quite often, grass-fed butter, kale, spinach, cheese, almonds, brazil nuts (1-2/day), seaweed, etc... learn to source vitamins and minerals through food. Lots of the supps you take are synthetic forms of the real deal and block the receptor if it does encounter real food. Just my opinion!
    In theory I agree with you. But...I hate most fish, so there's absolutely no way I can eat it every day, plus it's hella expensive.

    I will put it on my list of things to do to figure out how to source them through food. I also need to figure out how to get grass fed beef that's affordable (family of 4...with 2 growing kids) and pastured chickens/eggs. I eat eggs on a daily basis, but they aren't pastured. Again, very expensive (at least $4.50/doz in my area).

    Thank you for your opinion!

  3. #13
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    Here is my new blood work. I don't know what to make of the thyroid changes...can someone help me? Also, my BUN/Creatinine ratio is high. What does that mean?


  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jodeyh View Post
    Here is my new blood work. I don't know what to make of the thyroid changes...can someone help me? Also, my BUN/Creatinine ratio is high. What does that mean?

    Both free T4 and Free T3 went down. FT was at 71% of it's range and is now at 56%. FT3 was at 38%, now 13%.

    I wonder-- on what day of the week did you have the last set of tests done? And on what day of the week was the recent set done?

    I ask because you take the same dose of Levoxyl Monday- Saturday and then double it on Sunday. If the first set of tests were done at the beginning of the week and the recent set at the end of the week, that may explain the difference in results. I'm also curious as to why the different dose on Sunday, instead of .225 or .2375 each day.

    At any rate, IMO, your T4 to T3 conversion could be better.

    As for the BUN/Creatinine ratio-
    BUN: Common Questions | Blood Urea Nitrogen
    What is BUN-creatinine ratio? - WebMD Answers

  5. #15
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    If I may, how are you calculating the T3 and T4? I can't reproduce what you are doing, so clearly I'm using the wrong formula.

    The most recent 2 blood draws were both on a Tuesday. Weird.

    Also, got more blood work results today. I'm excited at my cholesterol levels...esp my trigs and LDL. But, if you look at the particles, I don't think that looks great. I didn't get the feeling that my doc liked doing that test (NMR) for me because she said that most docs, other than cardiologists don't use that test b/c they don't really know what the results indicate.

    She also did a CRP, which was really high: 15 (range is 0 - 4.9). She said that again, nobody really understands what this means and that the inflammation could be anything from an infection to allergies. We will repeat the test in a couple weeks. I'm wondering if it could be my thyroid because of the iodine I've been taking. Any thoughts on that?

    Here is blood work (the purple column indicates around the time I went Primal)
    Last edited by jodeyh; 04-22-2013 at 12:50 PM.

  6. #16
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    Anyone?

  7. #17
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    I have Hashi's but am well controlled, taking both T4 (Levoxyl) and T3 (Cytomel). My CRP is typically 0.1 or 0.2 when tested--despite the fact that I have rather severe osteoarthritis. So I think you should look into that very high CRP.

    Also, you mention that your goiter is growing. My nodules all stopped growing when I was optimally medicated. My endo does a sonogram annually to check because if they grow, it can be a serious problem. Isn't your doctor concerned?

    If your very low T3 indicates that you're having conversion problems, you need to get Rx'd T3 because that's the hormone that's critical--it controls metabolism and how we feel. When my T3 'tanked,' I was so fatigued that I couldn't get through a day without a 3-hour nap!

  8. #18
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    I'm just not sure how to get diagnosed. I talked to my GP yesterday (just b/c I had a physical and was there) and she said "that the most important value out of the thyroid numbers was the TSH." And that the T4 to T3 conversion doesn't really matter. I'm sitting there thinking to myself "WTF?"

    I'm going to give my endo, who I see next week, one more chance. I've seen him for years and I thought he knew what he was doing, but now I'm not so sure. Last year I complained about being cold all the time and my hair falling out, and he looked at my thyroid values and said it wasn't my thyroid. Now I have to wonder if he should have been digging a little further to see about conversion rates. This is stuff I Had no idea about when I saw him last. And he doesn't seem inclined to do more than he has to...

    My goiter...I have multi-nodular goiter. It has grown significantly over the past few years, and the endo has treated it with Levoxyl. I've gone up and down over the years, but currently I'm taking 200 mcg M-S and 2 pills on Sunday. The meds have made the goiter stop growing and maybe even shrink a little, but it's been years since I've been able to run my hand over my neck and not feel a big lump. I started supplementing with iodine in Dec '12 and my thyroid shrunk to smaller than anytime since I've been on Levoxyl. I started at 300mcg/day and went up to 600mcg/day when I had to get a different supplement (because they didn't sell the one I was using anymore). At that time, my endo had done a test and said that I did not have Hashi's, so supplementing with iodine was "fine, and wouldn't matter."

    I've had numerous ultrasounds on my thyroid, none of which have shown anything new or significant. So, no, I guess he isn't concerned.

    How does one get dx'd with T3 issues? I'm going to have to ask direct questions, so the more info I have with me, the better, I guess.

    I don't find that I'm all that tired...just cold and hair falling out.

    I feel like fixing my thyroid is key to getting the rest of me fixed...just have to get the endo on board!

  9. #19
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    You'd probably have to find another doctor to get diagnosed with "T3 issues" because any doctor who tells you that you 'don't have Hashi's' based on lab tests is suspect.

    My story--I was diagnosed simply as hypothyroid and tested regularly for about 5 years. No one mentioned Hashi's. But when I had a biopsy of one of my nodules, the report came back with the diagnosis of Hashi's (based on analysis of the tissue and fluid extracted). My endo said that he was glad to see that because he'd long suspected that I had Hashi's, but on my labs, the antibody level was never high enough for a diagnosis.

    I since learned that false negatives for Hashi's are common on blood tests because unless the thryoid is being actively attacked at the time the blood is drawn, the antibody level will be too low. My endo never told me I didn't have Hashi's because he knew that the lab tests are not reliable.

    Most doctors don't worry about this because the treatment is not for Hashi's but for hypothyroid. However, from the patient's perspective, this is important to know because many Hashi's people are either celiac or gluten intolerant (I am the latter).

    In addition, according to my endo, conversion problems are common with Hashi's, and it's important to track the T3 level--although my conversion problems happened practically overnight and very dramatically. Fortunately, I was scheduled for a regular check up within 2 weeks, so the problems was identified fairly quickly.

  10. #20
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    My understanding-- good conversion is indicated when both FT4 and FT3 are in approximately the same place in their respective ranges.. Meaning if both frees are at midpoint of their ranges then conversion is good. Midpoint of your FT4 is 129.5(130). Midpoint of your FT3 is 3.2.

    You are above midpoint for FT4 and barely in range for FT3. This suggests conversion problems.

    I would suggest first trying to help conversion without meds. I think I listed some things earlier. If I didn't, let me know and I will. If conversion is still subpar after doing things on the list then approaching your doctor about T3 meds is the next step.

    To approach your doctor, research T4 to T3 conversion so that you understand it and then go in prepared to get him/her to allow you to try something with both T4 and T3 in it like Armour or Naturethroid or to add a T3 med (Cytomel) to your Levoxyl.

    You might want to also research the meds too--Armour, Naturethyroid, cytomel. Combo meds tend to have a higher T4 to T3 ratio than the human thyroid does.

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