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Thread: Rippetoe's New Article - Must Read If You Have Strength Questions page 11

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Have to say, I'm perplexed by your request that we somehow try to prove an adaptation is GENERAL by proposing SPECIFIC tests.
    So, you are into metaphysic's then, operating with a abstract concept of "general strength" that never can be tested or measured whatsoever?

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Show me someone who squats 500 lbs to depth and I'll show you someone who can leg press an impressive amount of weight, even if he's never trained the leg press.
    I have personally observed cyclists that never barbell squatted in their life, outpress powerlifters in one legged legpress, what does that tell us?

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbag View Post
    I have personally observed cyclists that never barbell squatted in their life, outpress powerlifters in one legged legpress, what does that tell us?
    That your cyclists train the leg press.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    That your cyclists train the leg press.
    Right answer! And also that that they had more leg pressing "strength" than the powerlifters in those tests. I am sure that the powerlifters would have shown better back squat strength and the olympic weigthlifters the best front squat strength though, since strength basically is specific to what you have trained for! And just for the record, you also get a secondary "general" carryover effect from physiological adaptions, but that's not only from barbell movements...

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbag View Post
    Right answer! And also that that they had more leg pressing "strength" than the powerlifters in those tests. I am sure that the powerlifters would have shown better back squat strength and the olympic weigthlifters the best front squat strength though, since strength basically is specific to what you have trained for! And just for the record, you also get a secondary "general" carryover effect from physiological adaptions, but that's not only from barbell movements...
    I'm not sure what point you're proving here.
    Back to my icy bathtub full of iodine.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    As far as mundane tasks like picking something up and putting it on the shelf are concerned, and especially growing old and remaining functional, the person who has done stretching throughout his or her life is the one who is going to be able to pick something up off the floor and put it on a shelf, whether or not they have done strength exercises. Those who have lost their range of motion are the ones who will climb on a chair to reach a shelf they used to be able to reach with ease, then fall and break bones.
    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    How can you lose your range of motion while performing the barbell lifts advocated by Coach Rip?
    I have never done barbells before now. I have noticed since doing them that I HAVE lost some range of motion. Without the range of motion to bend over and pick things up, it doesn't matter that I can squat 100lbs. I can't hardly wash my own damn feet or pick an almond up off the floor because I can't reach. I have started doing more stretching and it is helping.

    I honestly believe that lifting barbells is the easiest way to improve your strength. But like someone else said, it's only a hammer. And not everything I want to be able to do is pound nails. If I want to keep full range of motion I have to stretch. If I want to keep my aerobic fitness I have to walk and hike. If I want to keep from getting bruises every time I put on a backpack and sleep on quarter inch foam, I have to go backpacking. If I want to do a pullup or pushups I have to do pullups and pushups.

    And the other thing with barbell training is that it is very hard on the body. It's easy to overdo it in many ways. It might be great to be strong enough to lift 2x body weight but is it healthy? I feel my health has gotten worse since lifting even though I like lifting and plan to keep doing it until I think I'm "strong enough." Whatever that means to me. It can be very difficult to lift often enough to get the adaptation thing going but not too often that you get sick and stay sick. And getting enough sleep and protein can also be a challenge.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    I have never done barbells before now. I have noticed since doing them that I HAVE lost some range of motion. Without the range of motion to bend over and pick things up, it doesn't matter that I can squat 100lbs. I can't hardly wash my own damn feet or pick an almond up off the floor because I can't reach. I have started doing more stretching and it is helping.

    I honestly believe that lifting barbells is the easiest way to improve your strength. But like someone else said, it's only a hammer. And not everything I want to be able to do is pound nails. If I want to keep full range of motion I have to stretch. If I want to keep my aerobic fitness I have to walk and hike. If I want to keep from getting bruises every time I put on a backpack and sleep on quarter inch foam, I have to go backpacking. If I want to do a pullup or pushups I have to do pullups and pushups.

    And the other thing with barbell training is that it is very hard on the body. It's easy to overdo it in many ways. It might be great to be strong enough to lift 2x body weight but is it healthy? I feel my health has gotten worse since lifting even though I like lifting and plan to keep doing it until I think I'm "strong enough." Whatever that means to me. It can be very difficult to lift often enough to get the adaptation thing going but not too often that you get sick and stay sick. And getting enough sleep and protein can also be a challenge.
    I don't understand how frequently squatting to depth and deadlifting can leave someone without the appropriate range of motion to pick things up off the floor. The concept honestly astonishes me.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    I don't understand how frequently squatting to depth and deadlifting can leave someone without the appropriate range of motion to pick things up off the floor. The concept honestly astonishes me.
    Take the deadlift, you lift a barbell off the floor. If you keep doing it, you will lose the ability to pick up things off the floor. I think Gorbag is right, strength is specific. I should stop lifting before it's too late, and I am in a feeble state with a 500lb deadlift which will leave me too inflexible to lift a box off the floor, and too specifically strong, just being able to exert force on a barbell and not much else.

  9. #109
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    I think it is because I workout and I get sore. But I have a desk job so I sit down with my sore muscles and they get shortened as they heal. It's a bit frustrating.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    I don't understand how frequently squatting to depth and deadlifting can leave someone without the appropriate range of motion to pick things up off the floor. The concept honestly astonishes me.
    Today, the concept doesn't astonish me at all. I am very new to the barbell game, a couple of weeks in. I did squats and OH press and a few accessory exercises yesterday. I am all stove up today with that wonderful stiffness and soreness of DOMS, which makes it hard to pick up something off the floor.

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