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Thread: avoiding pork and chicken? page 2

  1. #11
    cori93437's Avatar
    cori93437 is offline Senior Member
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    If high iron is an issue you can also do something nice to help control it and Donate Blood.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hedonist2 View Post
    Beef, lamb and seafood are fine. Pork and poultry are not necessary but many of us like them for variety. You don't have to do 100% pastured if you decide you want pork or chicken once in a while.
    I hardly ever cook pork or chicken myself, but would have a lot of it when at family or relatives places. I am sure theyre not pastured, as all fresh pork and chicken in Hong Kong come from China.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by zizou View Post
    I think the iron issue is worth mentioning. Why would you want to solely sustain on red meat and avoid chicken? Personally that's a bad move, and dammit you'd want as much variety as possible.

    My last blood check showed high iron, i felt pretty crap, definitley overdoing the red meat and to top it off eating offal and whatnot. Primal diet will easily lead to building up of iron stores, which has been linked to cancers, inflammation etc, particularly because the primal minimizes foods which prevent nutrient absorption and probably 8 out of 10 times your eating some vitamin c with that red meat.
    I never knew high iron could be an issue. I am still nursing a toddler and assume I need more nutrients. Since cutting down on breastfeeding, I noticed diminished appetite and no longer really crave meat. I also feel better without pork or chicken. Then again its conventional meat.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by breadsauce View Post
    Here in the UK it is easy to get hold of free range (which I think you call pastured) pork and outdoor chickens which eat grubs, slugs etc etc. The eggs are just great and I eat pork and chicken at least once a week. But also lamb, beef, fish etc - as long as it is naturally (or as naturally as possible given that it isn'e actually wild) reared. I don't worry about the O6 / O3 ratio as I feel that the free range aspect helps even that out, as does lots of fish... It's the flavour - good pork is in a class of its own, and a well roast free range chicken is sublime!
    Personally I wouldn't trust bog standard free range chicken or pork. Just because something is labelled as 'free range' doesn't mean that it is pastured, has access to anything more than a limited outdoor area and is fed anything other than grain. That's not to say that I'm saying you shouldn't eat it - there are a lot worse things, and I suspect it is still better than the average quality of chicken and pork in the US.

    I do eat quite a lot of pork but I source it very carefully and it is definitely pastured. I eat much less chicken because it is much more difficult to find organic, truly pastured sources of it and even those are sometimes fed grains.

  5. #15
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    ChocoTaco369 is offline Senior Member
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    I don't find chicken to be unhealthy. I find beef and lamb to be vastly superior because they are more nutritious, the fatty acid profile is much better and the protein is slightly higher quality, so I eat them far more. However, I'm not going to turn down chicken. I would advocate you choose leaner chicken - I generally go with the breast and roast or saute it to make up for its overall lack of flavor. It's hard to turn down buffalo wings though. So I don't

    Pork is an entirely different story. I feel it is the least healthy of all meats. I'm not sure if it's due to how similar it is so human tissue, but the body seems to reject it to some degree unless it is cured or acid marinated for a long time. This is definitely worth a read.

    How Does Pork Prepared in Various Ways Affect the Blood? - Weston A Price Foundation

    Untreated pork, even the high quality pastured stuff, seems to coagulate the blood. As a result, I purchase very lean pork (loin) and marinate it overnight in acid (vinegar, citrus) or stick to bacon and ham. Fresh pork chops not so much, but I never cared for pork chops anyway.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  6. #16
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    I discovered I feel worse when I go mental over the small distinctions. Giving up an enjoyable unrefined food based on a single datum feels a little too similar to 1980s anti-beef/egg/butter nutritionism. In the absence of actual reaction symptoms I hang my hat on the "rotating variety" approach.

  7. #17
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    I'm fairly new to this but isn't it recommended in the primal blueprint to only eat red meat twice a week?

    Organic, free range chicken is more expensive than the same in beef/lamb/pork and is harder to find but (after much net surfing) I found it is readily available direct from the farms and from most good organic grocery shops in Australia.

  8. #18
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    God, you all must be earning plenty in wages to be able to afford beef, lamb and seafood, or everything is cheap as chips in America?

    I eat pork and chicken almost daily and my tendinitis is 100% gone. So much for too high an n-6 dose...Grass fed and pasture raised is always best, but it really wont kill you if you ate pork and chicken. So long as you have cut out seed oil and the food that contains them then you wont be at risk of systemic inflammation, unless of course you eat 5 chickens a day!

    *goes back to gnawing at chicken wings*

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CavemanJoe View Post
    God, you all must be earning plenty in wages to be able to afford beef, lamb and seafood, or everything is cheap as chips in America?

    I eat pork and chicken almost daily and my tendinitis is 100% gone. So much for too high an n-6 dose...Grass fed and pasture raised is always best, but it really wont kill you if you ate pork and chicken. So long as you have cut out seed oil and the food that contains them then you wont be at risk of systemic inflammation, unless of course you eat 5 chickens a day!

    *goes back to gnawing at chicken wings*
    I agree on this to some extent ... except that you forget that muscle meat is not exactly the best to eat. Prefer ORGANS and you will find out that you can get those for much cheaper .

    EDIT: and organs are actually so nutritious that you don't even have to eat them every single day, which reduces your bill even more.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vague View Post
    I'm fairly new to this but isn't it recommended in the primal blueprint to only eat red meat twice a week?
    No. Mark regularly acknowledges ruminant meat to be superior to pork and poultry. I eat it most meals.
    Quote Originally Posted by CavemanJoe View Post
    God, you all must be earning plenty in wages to be able to afford beef, lamb and seafood, or everything is cheap as chips in America?
    CAFO beef is regularly on sale for $3/lb for basic cuts. Occasionally I find cheap stuff like london broil for <$2/lb, which makes it cheaper than chicken. My local Shop Rite sells lamb shoulder from Australia for $3.99/lb normal price, ground Australian lamb for burgers for $3.99/lb and it regularly goes on sale for <$3/lb. Australian lamb loin normal price is $5.99/lb. Australian bone-in leg of lamb is $5.49/lb regular price and regularly goes on sale for <$3/lb. About once a month, they have grassfed Australian whole beef tenderloin for $6.99/lb, so I usually pick up one or two. It lasts about a whole week.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 04-19-2013 at 09:00 AM.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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