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Thread: Any point in learning to lift heavy? page 3

  1. #21
    Annieh's Avatar
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    So, how heavy is heavy? Does one just keep building up the amount of weight you can use.

  2. #22
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    Yeah, just progressively heavier weights. What's heavy for you today will be your warmup in the future

  3. #23
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    Yep, a little more each time if you can manage it. Most of these programs will tell you to lift a certain weight for 3 sets of 5 reps or so (they vary) and if you can do that, next time you add 10lbs, 5lbs or in my case 1 or 2lbs. Basically, your workout always sucks the same amount but you get to write down bigger and bigger numbers in your log book. I went from squatting 45lbs to 125lbs. I'm back down to 100lbs as I work my way up again after I hurt myself a month ago. I want to make sure I don't out-lift my poor glute strength and hurt myself again.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Basically, your workout always sucks the same amount but you get to write down bigger and bigger numbers in your log book.
    When you put it that way, it sounds silly.

  5. #25
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    Heavy lifting has all the benefits listed already. A couple of other important ones that are emphasized inBody by science is improved insulin resistance as well improved body temperature regulation which is nice when you get older.

    You might want to make sure you have decent core strength before pushing too much with weights. Planks are great.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by miata View Post
    You might want to make sure you have decent core strength before pushing too much with weights. Planks are great.
    You don't think squats, presses, and deadlifts build core strength?

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    When you put it that way, it sounds silly.
    I can relate to that. It's always hard. It never gets any easier because as soon as you can do the weight you add more weight. I kind of dread every session but it's such a rush as soon as I get that first lift out of the way.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    You don't think squats, presses, and deadlifts build core strength?
    Sure they do. If you ease into them then sure. Planks are a really safe way of strengthening core. I do the BBS big 5 (chest press, leg press, rows, pull downs and overhead press) and find that the planks have a much bigger impact on on abs and over core including balance, etc.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by miata View Post
    Sure they do. If you ease into them then sure. Planks are a really safe way of strengthening core. I do the BBS big 5 (chest press, leg press, rows, pull downs and overhead press) and find that the planks have a much bigger impact on on abs and over core including balance, etc.
    So, to summarize: Your informed opinion as someone who doesn't squat or deadlift is that planks have a more profound impact on your "core" than squatting, and deadlifting?

    Planks are a great exercise, but stabilizing your trunk while holding yourself up on your elbows and toes can't compare to stabilizing your trunk while pulling 2 or 3 times your body weight.

  10. #30
    miata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    So, to summarize: Your informed opinion as someone who doesn't squat or deadlift is that planks have a more profound impact on your "core" than squatting, and deadlifting?

    Planks are a great exercise, but stabilizing your trunk while holding yourself up on your elbows and toes can't compare to stabilizing your trunk while pulling 2 or 3 times your body weight.
    I actually do squats once a week in addition to BBS with the leg presses. They are definitely good for core, and you can feel them getting worked while you are going up and down with the weight. My point is that planks are a decent safety measure and complementary to squats and dead lifts. I ignored core for most of my life and now that I have more of a focus I feel like I have more control when lifting -- I'm using more of my body.

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