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Thread: Questions for Stronglifts People page

  1. #1
    prufock's Avatar
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    Questions for Stronglifts People

    Primal Fuel
    Hey, I've been doing the Stronglifts program for about 6 months now. I've currently double-stalled on everything but dead lifts and so moved to 3x5. My current level is:
    Squat 310
    Press 105
    Bench 160
    Row 180
    Dead Lift 315
    I do a little stretching, cardio, and ab/shoulder/upper back work at the end.

    Couple of questions.

    1. I've stalled once on dead lifts (just recently) and so I'm de-loading from 345 down to 315 for my next workout. What do you do when you stall twice on DLs? It's 1x5 right from the start, so there's no room to decrease sets. Should I increase sets but work up more gradually to my working set or what? Right now I do 2 warmups.

    2. I'm planning to start a 12-week training program to run a 10 mile race in July. I've been meaning to do this for the past 4 years or so, but never actually get around to it. I used to run much more than I do these days (lately I don't do more than a mile or two at a time). I know the argument against "chronic cardio," but I want to do this as a challenge to myself (never run a 10 mile before).

    My question on this is: how much might I expect my lifts to suffer? With running 3-4 days a week, the program only gives you 2 days a week (and a couple weeks only 1 day) for cross-training, which is when I plan to do my lifting. Granted, I'm not always diligent about making my three days a week, though most weeks I do. There is at least 1 day, some weeks 2 days for rest in this running scheme.

    I expect to be ravenously hungry for those 12 weeks.

    3. Does anyone else get sort of depressed at the end of your workout? After my lifts are over I tend to do my light cardio (stationary bike, jump rope, treadmill, and/or kettleball swings), then stretch out and hit the sauna then shower. While I'm stretching I start to feel negative and sad - like a "why am I doing this, what's the point" kind of thing. I completely lose my motivation and it can last for a short time or up to a few hours afterwards. I think it's mostly during my stretching because that's when my mind is no longer focused on the work. It doesn't happen every time, but I've yet to identify a pattern. I'm going to try changing up (cardio before the workout or right at the end after stretching).

    I'm usually well-nourished before the gym, I drink tons of water, and I go home to eat directly afterwards. Is it just a hormonal drop now that the workout is over or what? I've always thought that exercise was supposed to make you feel good.

    Thanks all!

  2. #2
    RichMahogany's Avatar
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    Your lifts are horribly out of proportion. Do you have massive thighs and spindly little T-Rex arms? I'd say you might not be squatting to depth, but even the deadlift at 345 is miles ahead of a 160 bench and a 105 press. (That said, pressing 65% of your bench is pretty typical, so the upper body lifts seem proportional to each other at least).

    I'm assuming you're a guy. If you're a woman, disregard the above and pat yourself on the back on some impressive lifts. But how big a guy are you? If you weight 150 lbs, you're probably stalling because you've exhausted your novice gains. If you're 220, not so much.

    The issue with deadlifts is that they're really taxing on the CNS and require extra recovery time. If you're going to make an adjustment, do them less often. Stick to the 1 x 5, but maybe only every other week.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Your lifts are horribly out of proportion. Do you have massive thighs and spindly little T-Rex arms? I'd say you might not be squatting to depth, but even the deadlift at 345 is miles ahead of a 160 bench and a 105 press. (That said, pressing 65% of your bench is pretty typical, so the upper body lifts seem proportional to each other at least).

    I'm assuming you're a guy. If you're a woman, disregard the above and pat yourself on the back on some impressive lifts. But how big a guy are you? If you weight 150 lbs, you're probably stalling because you've exhausted your novice gains. If you're 220, not so much.

    The issue with deadlifts is that they're really taxing on the CNS and require extra recovery time. If you're going to make an adjustment, do them less often. Stick to the 1 x 5, but maybe only every other week.
    More info: I'm a guy. I'm 6', around 185-190 lbs at the moment. My upper body work may be behind because of my upper back. I've gone to physio for upper back stiffness/soreness, and was told that I have a meaty lower back but kind of weak upper back. Also stiff scapulas. This is the reason I do a little additional upper back work. I stalled on both bench and rows at 175-180, so just a bit under my bodyweight. I wouldn't say I have t-rex arms. Not as big as a lot of guys at the gym, but not skinny either.

    Technique at this weight with squats is an issue - first set good (hitting parallel or a bit lower fine), second set not so good, third set incomplete. I'm trying to focus on keeping the technique right, but I'm stalling at 310, I'll be dropping 10% if I don't finish my next set of squats.

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    RichMahogany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prufock View Post
    More info: I'm a guy. I'm 6', around 185-190 lbs at the moment. My upper body work may be behind because of my upper back. I've gone to physio for upper back stiffness/soreness, and was told that I have a meaty lower back but kind of weak upper back. Also stiff scapulas. This is the reason I do a little additional upper back work. I stalled on both bench and rows at 175-180, so just a bit under my bodyweight. I wouldn't say I have t-rex arms. Not as big as a lot of guys at the gym, but not skinny either.

    Technique at this weight with squats is an issue - first set good (hitting parallel or a bit lower fine), second set not so good, third set incomplete. I'm trying to focus on keeping the technique right, but I'm stalling at 310, I'll be dropping 10% if I don't finish my next set of squats.
    Switch to Wendler's 5/3/1 program and do the 2 days/week option. Use the calculator at blackironbeast.com to figure out your lifts, but buy the book.

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    As Rich says above, there does appear to be a vast disparity between your lifts (again assuming you are male). In response to your questions:

    1. Heavy deadlifts are extremely difficult for multiple reps (that is why 1X5 is used on both Stronglifts and Starting Strength). If you have stalled on them it will be very difficult to improve them much, if at all by following Stronglifts exactly. If you are still progressing on other lifts, I would stay on Stronglifts for everything else, but modify the deadlifting part. I suggest either reducing the frequency you lift heavy e.g. alternate between max effort one week and lower effort (70% or so for a couple of sets) the next or changing to triples, doubles, or even singles e.g. 1-2 sets of 3, or 2-3 sets of 2 of 3-5 sets of 1.

    2. Your lifts will suffer a bit, but if you make sure you are eating enough, avoid injury, and don't overdo anything, they should bounce back pretty quickly once you start lifting properly again. That said, you will probably benefit from easing back on the weights whilst training for the run. Most of us can't effectively train for long distance running and do intense weight sessions such as Stronglifts.

    3. Without knowing much about you or your situation (not even sure which sex you are!), it is difficult to address the post workout blues you get. I know I sometimes feel a bit down if a session hasn't gone well. Stronglifts can be a very intense workout and doing cardio afterwards, however light, may just be a bit much (it probably doesn't achieve much in fitness terms in any case). If you haven't already, try just stretching, showering and going home (yes, skip sauna too). It may just be you are spending too long in the gym, in which case you may just subconsciously know you are wasting time that could be spent doing other things.

    Just my two cents of course

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    Just saw you follow up post (posted whilst writing mine).

    This is a tricky one. On one hand you are stalling in most lifts. On the other, the weights themselves are all firmly within what I would classify as the novice band.

    It is also difficult to know how much your injuries will be effecting all this.

    Is there any chance you are simply overtraining or just not eating enough? Are you gaining or losing weight/fat?

    As a rough rule of thumb, something like Wendler's 5/3/1 should be moved onto once deadlift is over 2Xbodyweight, squat is approaching 2X, and bench is approaching 1.5 or so...
    Last edited by maclrc; 04-10-2013 at 08:41 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by maclrc View Post
    This is a tricky one. On one hand you are stalling in most lifts. On the other, the weights themselves are all firmly within what I would classify as the novice band.
    What is your criteria to determine whether someone is a novice?

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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    What is your criteria to determine whether someone is a novice?
    That's a good question, but I don't think it's relevant here. Race training is going to rob him of the ability to progress as a novice, even if he is one. Intermediate programming is actually appropriate in this case, because like an intermediate, he won't have the ability to progress like a novice.

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    you're probably stalling because you've exhausted your novice gains.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    Your lifts are horribly out of proportion. Do you have massive thighs and spindly little T-Rex arms?
    I literally laughed out loud reading this. I was thinking the same thing; the lifts are pretty disproportional. Although, you might just have an aptitude for squatting.

    Starting Strength has some charts that define the various levels novice, advanced, elite etc... you will have to dig them up, I'm too lazy!
    "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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