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  1. #31
    SeaHorse's Avatar
    SeaHorse is offline Senior Member
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    Yes, me too. Slacklining some 3 years. Have one mobile line to take to woods on weekends or to park during lunchtime. And one stationary in my garage, mostly for winter use. Could do the slacklining even with a hip problem and now after the hip replacement in December have to start the season. Still a bit too cold for outdoors. The garage one is ok, just not that chalenging.

  2. #32
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    I love slacklining! We set one up as part of our "home workout area". Great for the core and balance of course, but mostly just super fun. We built some frames and then anchor to a pole on one end and a huge fenced pile of rocks on the other end. You can kind of see the frames in this picture.
    Cslack1.jpg

    The Gibbon slack line package is pretty darn handy, easy to set up, and strong. Great for taking to a park if you don't have trees at home. Sierra Trading Post usually has great deals on them. Gibbon Slacklines Surfline Slackline - 30m - Save 35%

  3. #33
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    If you are just starting out, put your arms (hands) above your head, not out to the side. Move your hands left to right above your head to help you balance. Arms out to the side (as pictured) makes balancing much more difficult.

  4. #34
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    I see people with slacklines in the park near my house once in a while. I'll have to give it a try one of these days before I pay $60-100 for one. Good ideas buying the parts and pieces separately. Is that much cheaper?
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cavedude View Post
    I see people with slacklines in the park near my house once in a while. I'll have to give it a try one of these days before I pay $60-100 for one. Good ideas buying the parts and pieces separately. Is that much cheaper?
    It depends on your goals.

    You are going to want to be able to have at least 50 feet of length in the finished tightened line (eventually, but you'll start out around 25-30 feet in order to learn). To buy the pieces and parts separately to make a 25'-50' line, you'll need about 100 feet of one-inch wide slackline. Add the carabiners and other line locking devices, and you are just about at the cost of a discounted 15m (49') gibbon slackline. The gibbon is a two-inch wide line, which is a bit different than a one-inch line. Two-inch is easier to learn on, and allows more tricks, if you get the right type of two-inch.

    One-inch slacklines are the more traditional lines, and they are more common among folks who eventually get into longer lines ( > 100 feet), or even what's known as "high" lines (more than 30' off the ground).

    Most folks start with the pre-made gibbon style slacklines. They are quick to set up/tear down, easier to learn, and have lots of potential for growth as far as tricks and stuff.


    If you try it out, don't be discouraged if it takes you 20 mins to learn to stand still, and another 40 mins to start taking steps. That's the typical learning curve. Teens learn faster, adults perhaps slower. If you laugh uncontrollably on your first try, then I predict you'll become hooked, like me!
    Last edited by PBNewby; 05-06-2014 at 06:35 PM.
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ouaouaron View Post
    I got one for myself and my son at Christmas. I am now thinking about where to put it up. Our two trees are way too big around. I am going to build a framework that does not use trees. Hopefully soon we will be slacking. If we get good we can slack next winter in the snow too.
    Go to a climbing store and get two large slings OR and ATV supply type shop and you can get 2-3 inch wide looped webbing Recovery Strap Tree Saver Strap Tow Strap | etrailer.com good for a few 1000 lbs that can go around the tree and use that to hook up your line. I use those for my 1" primitive slack line. The advantage of the ATV slings is that they are wide and you dont have to use other protection for the tree.
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  7. #37
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    I have a 1" primitive line and a 2" gibbon line and I love using them both. I am not very good can manage about 10+ steps so far, pistol squat starts and a very short duration jump-on in the middle of the line.
    Your core will know you have been on a line and it is a great support to other sports like climbing.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
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  8. #38
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    I started off on the 1" lines so getting on the gibbon for the first time felt like a highway! Loved it and since I've been working a little more on tricks, prefer it. We have a lot of wind and the 1" webbing is a little less sensitive to going crazy in the wind so is a bit easier to stay on.

    The gibbons are hard to beat in terms of ease of setup if one is just starting out, IMO. The racheting gizmo is super easy to use, while tightening a webbing line can be a little tricky.
    M2M

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