Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Basic Workout ? page

  1. #1
    kskline's Avatar
    kskline is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    18

    Basic Workout ?

    Shop Now
    I belong to a gym and am just beginning to work out. I usually do about 30 min of low to moderate pace on a recumbant bike or treadmill. I usually work out in the women's workout room where they have several nautilus machines (about 12 different machines) a few free weights and the cardio equipment. I like working on the machines and was wondering if a basic workout of the following would suffice:

    Compound Row
    Pull Down
    Chest Press
    Leg Press
    Shoulder Press

    I'm not sure about the reps and sets. I'm about 140 pounds overweight and have had knee surgery and right now have some back issues going on, which I am getting physical therapy for.

    Any advice?

    Kim

  2. #2
    catpaws's Avatar
    catpaws is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Urbana, IL
    Posts
    14
    Machines are ok, but free weights are better in my opinion. The exercises you have chosen look good (best to stick with compound, not isolation exercises). The number of sets and reps is not super important; the key is to make sure that the last rep or two is quite difficult. If not, increase the weight.

    Just remember, you don't have to stick to the "women's weight room."

  3. #3
    kskline's Avatar
    kskline is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by catpaws View Post
    Machines are ok, but free weights are better in my opinion. The exercises you have chosen look good (best to stick with compound, not isolation exercises). The number of sets and reps is not super important; the key is to make sure that the last rep or two is quite difficult. If not, increase the weight.

    Just remember, you don't have to stick to the "women's weight room."
    So for example it wouldn't matter if I did 10 reps where the last 2 are difficult or 30 reps with difficulty at the end? Someday when I feel more comfortable, I might move out of the women's room. It's a comfortability matter right now, not the type of weights. Thanks for answering.

    Kim

  4. #4
    Manglor's Avatar
    Manglor is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Moncton, NB, Canada
    Posts
    3
    Kim,

    A lot has to do with your goals. From your comment I'm assuming it's weight loss and perhaps a part of rehab for your knee. The general rule of thumb for weight loss is to keep your reps between 8 and 12. I choose to go very heavy (and lower reps) but that's not necessary and given your knee, not recommended.

    The best way I've found to torch the fat is to stick with the big compound exercises that work a lot of muscles at the same time: Deadlift, squats, bench and shoulder press.

    Have you considered getting a trainer at least for a couple weeks to help speed up the "comfort" factor?
    SW: 287
    CW: 246
    GW: 215 w/ <10% BF

    1RM:
    Deadlift - 405lb - Goal: 500+
    Squat - 375lb - Goal: 400+
    Bench - 360lb - Goal: 225x30

  5. #5
    kskline's Avatar
    kskline is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Manglor View Post
    Kim,

    A lot has to do with your goals. From your comment I'm assuming it's weight loss and perhaps a part of rehab for your knee. The general rule of thumb for weight loss is to keep your reps between 8 and 12. I choose to go very heavy (and lower reps) but that's not necessary and given your knee, not recommended.

    The best way I've found to torch the fat is to stick with the big compound exercises that work a lot of muscles at the same time: Deadlift, squats, bench and shoulder press.

    Have you considered getting a trainer at least for a couple weeks to help speed up the "comfort" factor?
    Weight loss and to get my blood sugar down. I'm an unmedicated T2 diabetic and mornings are more problematic for me. My knee is actually pretty good. It was 3 yrs ago and I had extensive rehab; however, I don't have a lot of cartilege left, so don't want to ruin what's left. Can't afford a trainer right now. Thanks.

    Kim

  6. #6
    Katsuhiko the Rolfer's Avatar
    Katsuhiko the Rolfer is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    212
    My advice is to periodise your training over 6 weeks and then reassess your fitness and gradually increase the difficulty of what you can do

    so you progress over say 6 months from static machines, to dumbbells, to barbells, to kettlebells and then dynamic movement as you get stronger and more functional

  7. #7
    fayebym's Avatar
    fayebym is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    london
    Posts
    5
    The exercises you have chosen look good

  8. #8
    Richardmac's Avatar
    Richardmac is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    380
    Yes those exercises are great. Choosing to start on machines is no bad thing. Are they superior to free weights? Depends which side of the fence you are on. I have spent years using free weights to develop strenght for rugby with the occassional machine thrown in as a change (squat to leg press, BBrow to machine row etc).

    Deciding to change your life for the better and deciding to dedicate a few weeks to machine work to allow yourself to get comfortable with the gym environment using exercises were the resistance and plain of motion is fixed is a very sensible option.

    Advising you to jump into free weights and all their complexities etc first thing could be a winning idea, but as iv seen before it can be daunting and could scare some people off.

    The idea of a trainer is a good one, if you have the spare cash and dont mind someone watching you train and scrutinising your work (as a pt I can say that.

    Let us know what you decide.

    Richard
    It isn't the mountains ahead that wear you out....Its the grain of sand in your shoe.

  9. #9
    kskline's Avatar
    kskline is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Richardmac View Post
    Yes those exercises are great. Choosing to start on machines is no bad thing. Are they superior to free weights? Depends which side of the fence you are on. I have spent years using free weights to develop strenght for rugby with the occassional machine thrown in as a change (squat to leg press, BBrow to machine row etc). . . .

    The idea of a trainer is a good one, if you have the spare cash and dont mind someone watching you train and scrutinising your work (as a pt I can say that.

    Let us know what you decide.

    Richard
    Well, I've had a trainer before but it wasn't really worth the money because she didn't really show me anything I could take and do myself when she wasn't around. I don't mind a trainer watching but at this time, don't have the funds. I am starting with doing the recumbant bike for 30 min every day and will increase my time as I get more accustomed to it and I am starting with the machine weights doing the basics I listed above. I am doing a warm up set of a low weight and then I am increasing the weight so I can do one set of 10 with the last two being really hard. We'll see where that takes me.

    Currently I am doing pt right now for low back issues.

    Kim

  10. #10
    Katsuhiko the Rolfer's Avatar
    Katsuhiko the Rolfer is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    212
    great stuff kim, gradual progression is a great way to go but do yourself a favour and check your progress every 6 weeks or so... there is a fitness test you can do in the PBF book

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •