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    purple579's Avatar
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    Bulletproof Body-opinions? Experiences?

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    Came across their article on fitness after being linked to the bulletproof coffee recipe. Interesting concept-slow movements, only five exercises.
    Bulletproof Body ™
    My question-anyone have experience with this? I wonder about 1)only working out once a week 2)using machines-I've pretty much shunned them since going Primal and 3)no mention of sprinting.
    Thoughts?

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    They should be performed using machines since reaching muscular failure under free weights is dangerous.

    I stopped reading right there.

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    This is based on Body by Science (BBS) -- lots of other threads on BBS. I started about a month ago, and I'm impressed so far.

    The idea is to to complete failure with very slow movements --easier said than done, and dong it with a good machine is safer for things like leg presses/squats.

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    It's body by science, not health by science. You can look healthy-ish because of hypertrophy, but that does not make you healthier, or even necessarily fit.


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    They should be performed using machines since reaching muscular failure under free weights is dangerous.

    I stopped reading right there.
    Are you saying muscular failure under free weights is safe, or that there's no point to reaching muscular failure?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike_h View Post
    Are you saying muscular failure under free weights is safe, or that there's no point to reaching muscular failure?
    I'm saying the author is essentially saying free weights are dangerous and thus only machines should be used, which suggests to me the author's advice on training should be ignored.

    To answer your question, failure with free weights has a purpose, if your training calls for it. Whether it's safe depends on the lifter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    I'm saying the author is essentially saying free weights are dangerous and thus only machines should be used, which suggests to me the author's advice on training should be ignored.

    To answer your question, failure with free weights has a purpose, if your training calls for it. Whether it's safe depends on the lifter.
    You have to really try this once to appreciate it. It is a very different approach. I'm a big fan of free weight and even prefer dumbbells over barbells for many things. However, I found it much effective to kill my muscles with machines using the the very slow reps - 10-20 sec is very long. This is especially true with something like chest flys where the resistance varies radically through the full motion. Using cables provides a more uniform load which is ideal when you want smooth motion. I haven't used Nautilus in many years, but I think that that type of uniform resistance would be ideal.

    I was dong everything in my home gym, but decided to only do leg presses safely with a machine. I really love squats, but it was impossible to go to failure with my simple rack and no spotter.

    I'm considering some kind of hybrid approach where I do BBS once a week and insert a more traditional free weight routine in each week after five days of recovery from BBS.

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    I'm saying the author is essentially saying free weights are dangerous and thus only machines should be used
    That's a very black and white view. Doug McGuff (Body By Science), where this info seems to be adapted from has spoken about equipment with a bit more nuance. He's not opposed to free weights in many cases and certainly doesn't say they are outright dangerous. I'd much rather have my muscles fail under a chest press machine than a bench press.

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    Quote Originally Posted by miata View Post
    You have to really try this once to appreciate it. It is a very different approach. I'm a big fan of free weight and even prefer dumbbells over barbells for many things. However, I found it much effective to kill my muscles with machines using the the very slow reps - 10-20 sec is very long. This is especially true with something like chest flys where the resistance varies radically through the full motion. Using cables provides a more uniform load which is ideal when you want smooth motion. I haven't used Nautilus in many years, but I think that that type of uniform resistance would be ideal.

    I was dong everything in my home gym, but decided to only do leg presses safely with a machine. I really love squats, but it was impossible to go to failure with my simple rack and no spotter.

    I'm considering some kind of hybrid approach where I do BBS once a week and insert a more traditional free weight routine in each week after five days of recovery from BBS.
    I am not sure what you're trying to do when you say "effective to kill my muscles". I don't judge a training plan based on whether it "kills" my muscles, I judge it by its effectiveness in making me stronger.

    You can get a power rack with safeties for ~$250, cheaper than a year of gym membership.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike_h View Post
    That's a very black and white view. Doug McGuff (Body By Science), where this info seems to be adapted from has spoken about equipment with a bit more nuance. He's not opposed to free weights in many cases and certainly doesn't say they are outright dangerous. I'd much rather have my muscles fail under a chest press machine than a bench press.
    Why would your muscles fail in a bench press, or any other free weight exercise? If you use some common sense and educate yourself on proper form, I don't see how that is realistically possible. I don't know how you train, but I know exactly what I am capable of and how much to push myself to make progress. I don't just randomly slap an extra 50lb on the bar when I bench. When I know I am doing a heavy set, I never do it without a spotter. I don't see how within this framework my muscles can suddenly give out and drop the bar.

    At some point you have to accept the fact that if you don't want to be an out of shape slob and want good function out of your body, there is always some risk of injury regardless of how you train. What you have to consider is the risk of injury vs. just not doing anything.

    The reason why I have this black and white view is because free weights have been proven effective in making millions of people very strong over the course of decades. Machines have proven good at generating profit for equipment manufacturers and gyms, and keeping people much weaker than they need to be. It just depends if the risk of injury from doing free weights with common sense and proper form is worth the significant strength you're not gaining by using machines.

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