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Thread: Bulletproof Body-opinions? Experiences? page 2

  1. #11
    mike_h's Avatar
    mike_h is offline Senior Member
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    Strength training programs (e.g. 5x5) are often designed that you don't reach muscle failure. For those programs free weights make a lot more sense than machines. McGuff doesn't dispute this, and my own resistance work is also with free weights (without a spotter) with a load and reps I can manage without failing.

    However if you are following a program that'll likely see your muscles fail then I don't think McGuff or Asprey are crazy to say machines are safer in that scenario. Theirs aren't pure strength programs, different goals, different modes.

    I haven't read BBS, and I don't follow its program, but my understanding is that you're doing 50-90 seconds of time under load with as much resistance as possible. Even if you can no longer move the weight/machine, you keep applying force.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike_h View Post
    Strength training programs (e.g. 5x5) are often designed that you don't reach muscle failure. For those programs free weights make a lot more sense than machines. McGuff doesn't dispute this, and my own resistance work is also with free weights (without a spotter) with a load and reps I can manage without failing.

    However if you are following a program that'll likely see your muscles fail then I don't think McGuff or Asprey are crazy to say machines are safer in that scenario. Theirs aren't pure strength programs, different goals, different modes.

    I haven't read BBS, and I don't follow its program, but my understanding is that you're doing 50-90 seconds of time under load with as much resistance as possible. Even if you can no longer move the weight/machine, you keep applying force.
    That's exactly how it works. The time after your muscles fail and you keep trying to move the weight, that's when you're inroading your muscles.

    But BBS is difficult for mutiple reasons. I've tried BBS before and never saw results because 1) difficulty of timing myself accurately under TUL, 2) going to failure every workout, and 3) lack of habit-forming exercise mentality.

    I then went to Stronglifts 5x5, learned how to move barbells, created an exercise habit, and continually progressed every workout. Although I have injuried myself a couple times, it was because of my ignorance on proper form where I should've been more careful with heavier weights. My gains have far outweighed my injuries, though, and my strength has skyrocketed over just one year. Went from 100lb squat to 250lb, and 135lb deadlift to 295. I don't think i would've seen better results from BBS even if I could get it right, but who knows.

    Tim Ferriss does something similar with his 5-second cadence with barbells and that gave him great results as well. Perhaps there's something to be said about slow-reps, TUL, AND barbell training.

  3. #13
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    I understand what he's saying to a certain extent. I don't necessarily think it IS safe to lift to fatigue if you don't have a spotter or aren't in a gym. There are plenty of things that can go wrong!

    That isn't to say I think this program makes sense or will work well (although I do have a certain degree of respect for the Bulletproof Executive and I drink bulletproof coffee and use some of his recommended supplements). I think there are more advantages to using free weights with a range of motions and a range of different exercises.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    I am not sure what you're trying to do when you say "effective to kill my muscles". I don't judge a training plan based on whether it "kills" my muscles, I judge it by its effectiveness in making me stronger.

    You can get a power rack with safeties for ~$250, cheaper than a year of gym membership.
    The idea behind BBS is that you push your muscle fibers to failure. The idea is to hit the slow twitch, the fast twitch and anything between. This way by the end of a set you don't have one type of fiber covering for the others, they are all worn down in the slow movement. You also hit the fibers hard through the entire movement. By the end of a set you are blowing out your lungs. I thing the key is the slow motion. With normal speed movements I am not breathing hard until the last two or three reps. With BBS I am breathing heavily after 30 seconds, really heavily after a minute and hyperventilating by the end.

    I'm doing just fine with the machines at my company gym that cost me nothing. As far as results, I made more dramitic improvement in my cycling with three sets of leg presses over two weeks than I did with two months of previous squats. Sure I made improvements with squats, but felt like I had new cycling muscles after the slow motion leg presses.

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