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Thread: B*tchapalooza 2013 page 3

  1. #21
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoJenGo View Post

    I dig the one-pot-meal thing, too. What are some of your faves? Maybe there's a Bitchapalooza Recipe Thread in your future?
    I'm not sure I have a favorite, but give me a protein, and I'll figure out a stir fry with something in the fridge. Also, I'm not above just dumping a can of sardines on top of white rice and calling it a meal. Also, any kind of beef with two fried eggs on top. I call that protein with a side of protein.

    Quote Originally Posted by Urban Forager View Post
    Another food snob here, I too have wondered what folks were eating pre-primal. For us it wasn't such a dramatic shift form the way we were eating, the 2 big changes were eliminating my home made wild yeast sourdough and super tasty home made granola made with honey from our bees. I probably spend an excessive amount of money and time on food but it's my passion and used to be my profession until we moved to the boonies and chefing just didn't pay what it did in the big city. Now my family is the recipient of my zealous cooking.

    As to drinking I wish I could afford to spend the kind of money I spend on food on wine, alas my husband's salary just isn't that flexible. But that's okay because my palate is flexible when it comes to wine, I'd rather have inexpensive wine than no wine!
    I'm not sure I could have given up that wonderful sourdough. But I'm not a 100%er and I do allow myself the occasional wheat day, though they are becoming less frequent. And I agree, inexpensive wine is better than no wine. There is so much California and Australian wine at reasonable prices that are more than good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Khainag View Post
    Thoroughly enjoyable post!

    The bit about adapting Paula Deen, great stuff... and pretty unsnobby? But you live in Florida right? Could be that she is seen differently there... I'm in New Jersey, so I assume that Food Network has Barefoot Contessa for the snobs from these parts who see "fat hick" with Paula Deen. (one thing though... do you need coconut flour? If you need to bind just use egg yolks (or more fat), right?)
    I love them both. Ina (Barefoot Contessa) has the life I would have chosen. Brilliant, loving husband, homes in Connecticut and the Hamptons. Down to earth for her audience when in reality, she is the consummate Jewish Princess. I just watched a show of hers where a friend and she made chili. Even they were laughing at the idea of two Jewish NYers making chili. "Why do you use brisket?" "Because it's NY chili."

    Paula, otoh, is bright colors, dangle earrings, ostentatious engagement ring while she cooks. Total other end of the spectrum. Tough life in the beginning, but turns it around.

    I currently live in N'Orleans. I grew up in NY (Long Island and then upstate), and as an adult have lived in San Francisco (because it was the early 70s and where else would I want to live?), FL (to be near my grandmother), OH, Hoboken, NJ (because I wanted to work in Manhattan before I died), WA, OR, and now here.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  2. #22
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cryptocode View Post
    You're not wrong on that. Except maybe about this being a free country. I came here after some years of studying Economics. Compare the two. The Gov't tells us what money we can use and requires us to use it. So they can steal it from us behind the scenes. And they've been doing it for so long we have forgotton what free money is or that it could even exist.

    Now just substitute Monsanto for Gov't and food for money.

    At least for food we still have some choices. I agree with the others that it would be best to support local paleo/primal growers and I think they can be trusted, especially when they went into the business for the same reasons we joined this forum. They just decided to go a little farther into it. In fact, if we don't support them, soon there will be no free food choices left in our country.

    Where ever you live you can find a local 4-H and/or FFA fair, or state fair. At their auctions you bid on a $/lb live weight for the animal and select from a list of butchers. Then you phone that butcher and tell them how you want it cut. When you pick it up it's all frozen, wrapped and labeled. Take friends with you a split a cow, or buy a lamb. This is not as good as the EatWild.com, but it's second best.

    I buy 'grass-fed' eggs from my neighbor, grass-fed beef (but I'm going to find a different source), raw milk from a grocery 45 min away. I'm looking into cheese and milk from a 1/2 hour away goat diary. It's fun to find these but it may take a lot of driving to get it. (I really love goat cheeses.)

    But I'm way behind you on cooking that requires any effort.

    Best of Luck.
    Good info on the 4H - thank you. Also, I agree totally on the whole govt/corp axis of evil thing. But I also kind of think that no one has power over us lest we give it to them. So barring a gun at my head, my choices are clear - listen to someone else, or do what I want to do. Or in the lingo of my generation, there is always some way to circumvent "the man."

    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    Oh yeah, I hear you Joanie.

    I would say for myself I was not a food "snob" but I did try to eat "healthy" (not that it worked, since my definitions of healthy were off base). However, it did mean that changing to primal was in some ways just a tweak, in that I had to get rid of the grains and processed oils, there was not much else too disastrous.

    But now, definitely a food snob. So many things I see people putting in their mouths and feeding their children that just disgust me. I should be careful to hide this reaction as it's really quite obnoxious. After all, I would not want someone thinking that way about me. That's why it's nice to come on here with people who actually understand.

    And the further I'm going on with primal (coming up 10 months now), the more snobby I get - looking out for organics and free range etc, and preferring to eat my own food than to go out where there's no assurance that what I'm given will be wholesome, or even taste good.
    Looks like you and I got to MDA about the same time. Getting rid of bad oils and taking my wheat consumption down to no more than one day a week was easy for me. It was some of the new ideas that made me cringe. Spending twice as much on food so that it wasn't factory food, giving up my diet mayo and butter subs for the full fat real ones. And I'm with you on how the longer I do this, the more of a snob I become.

    Quote Originally Posted by jacmac View Post
    Oh dear, I guess I am going to be the one to tell you what was eaten before becoming primal

    Bread with some bread and then some more bread. In fact bread with every meal and as a snack in between. Then the bread was accompanied by potatoes.

    If those potatoes were cut up and deep fried and then placed between two slices of bread well that was heaven on a stick.

    No meal was complete without either bread or potatoes.

    The processed food we ate was more like baked beans and spaghetti.

    I am please to report now we have had a break up with bread, baked beans and spaghetti and our pantry is primal.
    That's a huge change, and you are brave to dive in like that. I think that often it depends on what decade you were born. As a baby of the 50s and a child of the 60s, going to McD or KFC, or even Arthur Treacher's Fish and Chips was a bit of a drive. So, it was a special occasion and not something we did every day. Also, where you live is key. If you live in a city, where there are all kinds of ethnic foods and so much variety in general, you're not as likely to be indoctrinated to eating at places with drive-throughs and golden arches. I have a lot of admiration for people who can change that mindset.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  3. #23
    NZ primal Gwamma's Avatar
    NZ primal Gwamma is offline Senior Member
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    Joanie - woohoo, I shall salute your new journal with a glass of red tonight........................
    "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

    ...small steps....

  4. #24
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    Lucky Charms and Cocktail Parties

    Thank you, Gwamma!

    The rest deleted by me.
    Last edited by JoanieL; 02-19-2014 at 11:26 PM.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  5. #25
    NZ primal Gwamma's Avatar
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    Sicilian ......... I loved that movie - The princess Bride...... weren't the bad guys Sicilian ???????? L-O-V-E-D it !!!!!!!!
    I actually agree with you Joanie - our pasts shape our futures, contribute to making us the people we are today.
    .....and I have bent an elbow for you already................... heres to Joanie ! (pretend their is a little picture of a bubble raising a glass - cos Gwamma ain't got no idea how to do those little Joanie figure things !)
    "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

    ...small steps....

  6. #26
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    Did any one ever tell you that you are a bad influence?! First the bacon/chocolate and now the cream cheese/cracker/ oyster thing! Actually I think the oyster thing will be perfect to take on my trip; I just need to pick up some GF crackers, I already have goat cheese and smoked oysters.

    It sounds like you and I are about the same age (I'm 52), there are some things that my parents always had on hand that I'm still found of: pimento stuffed olives, Giadiniera picked veg, and of course smoked oysters.

    I must remember to eat before I read your posts!

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    Joanie, are you a writer? If not, you should be. I love the descriptive accounts of your life! You paint an entertaining picture with few words. I know I can relate to those "cocktail parties" and I'm sure I'm not the only one! I can't say I ever saw my dad
    dressed as Baby New Year, though. Damn, you had it good....

    Gwamma, great to see a fellow Princess Bride fan! One of the best movies EVERRRRRrrrr!
    Life is not a matter of having good cards, but of playing a poor hand well.

    - Robert Louis Stevenson

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    Joanie, it's interesting how people can live through the same decades and have very similar... and very different... experiences. (I'll be 56 next month.) I can totally relate to the cocktail party memories, but with an abusive alcoholic father, my idea of "drinking" is a half-glass of red wine on a wedding anniversary that ends in "5". I was also allowed to drink as a teen, but never enjoyed it.

    My mom cooked mostly primal before the term was invented, and my recollections of hors d’oeuvres are mushrooms stuffed wth sausage and spices... shrimp with home-made cocktail sauce... raw oysters with horseradish... these crab things that I wish I'd gotten the recipe for (crabmeat, grated parmesan? cheese and finely chopped tomatoes and spices, glopped onto a clam shell and set under the broiler). My mom even had these little seafood forks to eat them with!

    She also always had interesting artisan cheeses and crackers.

    I have to say that I think crackers are the one thing I miss the most. I've made a couple almond-flour kinds, and a plantain kind, but haven't yet found a recipe that has the delicate flavor and crisp that works well with artisan cheese. I manage to make do by eating the cheese with my fingers, though.

    I have discovered that a thin layer of grated pecorino romano can be fried, and when cool is crispy!

    Thanks for the tour down memory lane!

  9. #29
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    Parmesan crisps:

    Prep a baking tray & cover in greaseproof paper.

    Put a round former of your choice on the tray & fill with finely grated parmesan

    Here is the recipe in full

    1. Grate the Parmesan finely. (The finest Microplane grater does a good job because it produces thin ribbons, not granules.)
    2. Put a sheet of greaseproof paper (or a silpat sheet, if you have one) over the back of a baking tray (better to put it over the back than inside the tray, as it is easier subsequently to slide the Crisps off if you don't have to negotiate the rim of the tray at the same time).
    3. Using a 2" circular pastry-cutter, place the cutter on top of the greaseproof paper and sprinkle a heaped teaspoon of cheese inside the cutter to make a complete disk; make sure the edge of the disk particularly is well covered. (Do NOT press the cheese down into place - it will melt and collapse delicately into itself as it bakes.)
    4. Move the cutter along, and repeat the process. Continue until the greaseproof paper is covered in cheese disks. Leave a few millimetres between each disk - they don't spread in baking like biscuits do.
    5. Bake at 175C for 8-10 minutes until golden brown. They start to brown when they stop bubbling, so watch them carefully. When golden brown transfer them to a wire rack to cool and crisp. Store in an air-tight container, and try not to eat too many before you have to serve them to your guests!
    Enjoy.

  10. #30
    JoanieL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NZ primal Gwamma View Post
    Sicilian ......... I loved that movie - The princess Bride...... weren't the bad guys Sicilian ???????? L-O-V-E-D it !!!!!!!!
    I actually agree with you Joanie - our pasts shape our futures, contribute to making us the people we are today.
    .....and I have bent an elbow for you already................... heres to Joanie ! (pretend their is a little picture of a bubble raising a glass - cos Gwamma ain't got no idea how to do those little Joanie figure things !)
    Yes, Gwamma, we Sicilians are often the bad guys. And while I don't have a bubbling glass, I do have this for a toast:

    Quote Originally Posted by Urban Forager View Post
    Did any one ever tell you that you are a bad influence?! First the bacon/chocolate and now the cream cheese/cracker/ oyster thing! Actually I think the oyster thing will be perfect to take on my trip; I just need to pick up some GF crackers, I already have goat cheese and smoked oysters.

    It sounds like you and I are about the same age (I'm 52), there are some things that my parents always had on hand that I'm still found of: pimento stuffed olives, Giadiniera picked veg, and of course smoked oysters.

    I must remember to eat before I read your posts!
    LOL yes. When I went to Girl Scout camp, they dubbed me "Wayward Leader." My parents were so proud. You and I are close in age, but I'm at the tail end of my 50s.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoJenGo View Post
    Joanie, are you a writer? If not, you should be. I love the descriptive accounts of your life! You paint an entertaining picture with few words. I know I can relate to those "cocktail parties" and I'm sure I'm not the only one! I can't say I ever saw my dad
    dressed as Baby New Year, though. Damn, you had it good....

    Gwamma, great to see a fellow Princess Bride fan! One of the best movies EVERRRRRrrrr!
    *blush* I'm afraid I don't have what it takes to be a writer. Those people work hard. It's constant writing, editing, submitting, rejection, etc. Sadly, the ambition gene is barely visible in me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Goldie View Post
    Joanie, it's interesting how people can live through the same decades and have very similar... and very different... experiences. (I'll be 56 next month.) I can totally relate to the cocktail party memories, but with an abusive alcoholic father, my idea of "drinking" is a half-glass of red wine on a wedding anniversary that ends in "5". I was also allowed to drink as a teen, but never enjoyed it.

    My mom cooked mostly primal before the term was invented, and my recollections of hors d’oeuvres are mushrooms stuffed wth sausage and spices... shrimp with home-made cocktail sauce... raw oysters with horseradish... these crab things that I wish I'd gotten the recipe for (crabmeat, grated parmesan? cheese and finely chopped tomatoes and spices, glopped onto a clam shell and set under the broiler). My mom even had these little seafood forks to eat them with!

    She also always had interesting artisan cheeses and crackers.

    I have to say that I think crackers are the one thing I miss the most. I've made a couple almond-flour kinds, and a plantain kind, but haven't yet found a recipe that has the delicate flavor and crisp that works well with artisan cheese. I manage to make do by eating the cheese with my fingers, though.

    I have discovered that a thin layer of grated pecorino romano can be fried, and when cool is crispy!

    Thanks for the tour down memory lane!
    My godmother is like that because her father didn't handle alcohol well. She didn't even have her first glass of wine 'til she was in her late thirties. I will find a paleo/primal cracker that is delicious eventually, though I wouldn't hold my breath since I tend to sloth-like tendencies. My dad was a happy drunk, as am I, and he really only drank at those parties and on holidays.

    Quote Originally Posted by Katsuhiko the Rolfer View Post
    Parmesan crisps:

    Prep a baking tray & cover in greaseproof paper.

    Put a round former of your choice on the tray & fill with finely grated parmesan

    Here is the recipe in full

    1. Grate the Parmesan finely. (The finest Microplane grater does a good job because it produces thin ribbons, not granules.)
    2. Put a sheet of greaseproof paper (or a silpat sheet, if you have one) over the back of a baking tray (better to put it over the back than inside the tray, as it is easier subsequently to slide the Crisps off if you don't have to negotiate the rim of the tray at the same time).
    3. Using a 2" circular pastry-cutter, place the cutter on top of the greaseproof paper and sprinkle a heaped teaspoon of cheese inside the cutter to make a complete disk; make sure the edge of the disk particularly is well covered. (Do NOT press the cheese down into place - it will melt and collapse delicately into itself as it bakes.)
    4. Move the cutter along, and repeat the process. Continue until the greaseproof paper is covered in cheese disks. Leave a few millimetres between each disk - they don't spread in baking like biscuits do.
    5. Bake at 175C for 8-10 minutes until golden brown. They start to brown when they stop bubbling, so watch them carefully. When golden brown transfer them to a wire rack to cool and crisp. Store in an air-tight container, and try not to eat too many before you have to serve them to your guests!
    Enjoy.
    Thank you for the recipe. I've done this and it is delicious. But it's not a Ritz. When I invent the paleo/primal version of a Ritz, I shall become rich and famous. As if.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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