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Thread: Is PBF the best choice if your really serious about getting stronger

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  1. #1
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    Is PBF the best choice if your really serious about getting stronger

    Like serious serious. Like how boxers need to train to earn money and... sort like that.

  2. #2
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    It can certainly help, especially if you are starting from zero. I would think the pushups alone would be great for a boxer. But in my opinion, it's hard to beat barbell training in terms of "bang for your buck", especially if your primary goal is to get stronger.

  3. #3
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    Ask Bruce Lee
    Maybe not exactly PBF but not a hi tech gym rat.
    If you're looking for best, most efficient, training at an elite level, I'd think you would need a good trainer to make it specific for you.
    Last edited by Tom B-D; 04-03-2013 at 06:04 AM.

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    i agree that barbel training is great for raw strength, like power lifting or olympic lifting. but if you want to do something with that strength, i think you need something like PBF or another bodyweight program or movnat where you are actually moving your body through space. i guess that's the whole idea behind crossfit.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by primalrob View Post
    i agree that barbel training is great for raw strength, like power lifting or olympic lifting. but if you want to do something with that strength, i think you need something like PBF or another bodyweight program or movnat where you are actually moving your body through space. i guess that's the whole idea behind crossfit.
    Uhm, what? Would you mind explaining how "raw strength" from barbells is not usable?

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    Quote Originally Posted by quikky View Post
    Uhm, what? Would you mind explaining how "raw strength" from barbells is not usable?
    i think perhaps you missed what i was saying, or i didn't articulate it properly. my point is that raw strength is great, but being able to use that strength to move your own body through space is better. so, do deadlifts...but do pull ups and pushups or carry some rocks and logs too. strength should be about more than what you can do in the gym...just my opinion though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by primalrob View Post
    my point is that raw strength is great, but being able to use that strength to move your own body through space is better. so, do deadlifts...but do pull ups and pushups or carry some rocks and logs too. strength should be about more than what you can do in the gym...just my opinion though.
    So you're saying that training my deadlift and squat is just for gym bragging rights but will not translate to me being able to lift and carry heavy stuff off the ground, such as a log? If we assume this for a second, what muscles involved in lifting something off the ground are neglected by the deadlift and how are these muscles trained better with other, especially bodyweight, exercises?

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    Quote Originally Posted by primalrob View Post
    i think perhaps you missed what i was saying, or i didn't articulate it properly. my point is that raw strength is great, but being able to use that strength to move your own body through space is better. so, do deadlifts...but do pull ups and pushups or carry some rocks and logs too. strength should be about more than what you can do in the gym...just my opinion though.
    I think you're misguided about how general an adaptation strength actually is and therefore are confused about what the best way might be to stimulate that adaptation.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by primalrob View Post
    i think perhaps you missed what i was saying, or i didn't articulate it properly. my point is that raw strength is great, but being able to use that strength to move your own body through space is better. so, do deadlifts...but do pull ups and pushups or carry some rocks and logs too. strength should be about more than what you can do in the gym...just my opinion though.
    In order to progress with barbell training you have to learn to move with correct form. As such, compound barbell lifts train your body to move correctly - something that most of us have forgotten. You can do most bodyweight exercises with bad form and get away with it. On top of that, you can scale the load on barbells precisely which enables you to build strength far more efficiently than either performing bodyweight moves to fatigue or lifting rocks (unless your rocks increase in weight by 2.5 kg increments) . I agree that lifting rocks and logs is a far more useful skill than lifting a barbell, but you won't be able to lift awkward loads close to your limits safely until you have mastered the barbell dead lift. If you can't lift close to your limits, you will progress slowly.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kinnell View Post
    In order to progress with barbell training you have to learn to move with correct form. As such, compound barbell lifts train your body to move correctly - something that most of us have forgotten. You can do most bodyweight exercises with bad form and get away with it. On top of that, you can scale the load on barbells precisely which enables you to build strength far more efficiently than either performing bodyweight moves to fatigue or lifting rocks (unless your rocks increase in weight by 2.5 kg increments) . I agree that lifting rocks and logs is a far more useful skill than lifting a barbell, but you won't be able to lift awkward loads close to your limits safely until you have mastered the barbell dead lift. If you can't lift close to your limits, you will progress slowly.
    Exactly. People forget that to be better at lifting heavy things - you have to actually lift heavy things. Your bodyweight isn't particularly heavy when it comes to a lot of bodyweight work, especially if you're young and healthy, and can only provide progress in strength for a brief period of time.

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