Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 55

Thread: kid loves bread. alternatives? page 2

  1. #11
    Zach's Avatar
    Zach is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,869
    Quote Originally Posted by The Rebooted Body View Post
    The question is...why is it necessary? It's void of nutrition and has questionable side effects on overall health.

    The proper answer here is to stop feeding her bread, period. There is no nutrition requirement for bread. There's no reason to feed a child bread.
    Ugh to the max! How about because bread tastes good? If you want to be a neurotic parent who starts their child off with a great big food complex then go ahead and eliminate all grains. Or you can except that bread is a part of our culture and your kid is going to eat it whether you have a food phobia or not.

  2. #12
    Geeknik's Avatar
    Geeknik is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    71
    I would just make the kid a Norwegian style open faced sandwich. Get a loaf of organic, European, Artisanal style bakery bread. Then smear one slice with a pat of grass-fed butter. Top with sliced Danish salami, Jarlsberg cheese, bell pepper &/or cucumber slices.

  3. #13
    SuBee's Avatar
    SuBee is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    74
    I'm going to side with Zach here. Barring celiac or serious allergies, I just don't see a reason to make a big fuss over the bread. If you can't find one without lots of extra stuff (especially seed oils) then it might be worth it to make your own (this would also allow you to throw in some quinoa flour or similar). Will she eat sourdough? Some folks think that's better. I have also seen arguments that white bread is better than whole wheat (in the same way that white rice is better than brown--fewer antinutrients). But a mix is fine, or whatever she likes best.

    I think people are missing out on the OP's point that the child is often with other family members who are not primal. Better and healthier for everyone to keep the food issues relaxed, IMO, and maintain happy, stress-free family relationships.

    One thing that might be helpful is having a tray of snacks (lots of choices in a muffin tin, for instance) available for your child. That way she can help herself and might choose to eat something handy (and primal) instead of waiting 'til she's hungry and has already decided that only bread will do.

    I also would not even try to offer alternatives if she has asked for bread--just give it to her. She may have already divined that people are going to be difficult if she asks for bread and she may be digging in her heels right from the start. If you can remove any stress about the issue, you can avoid making her desire for bread part of her personal campaign to demonstrate her autonomy : )

  4. #14
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    4,873
    Quote Originally Posted by SuBee View Post
    I'm going to side with Zach here. Barring celiac or serious allergies, I just don't see a reason to make a big fuss over the bread. If you can't find one without lots of extra stuff (especially seed oils) then it might be worth it to make your own (this would also allow you to throw in some quinoa flour or similar). Will she eat sourdough? Some folks think that's better. I have also seen arguments that white bread is better than whole wheat (in the same way that white rice is better than brown--fewer antinutrients). But a mix is fine, or whatever she likes best.
    The child eats little but bread. When she is hungry, she demands bread and refuses anything else.

    Constipation can be a symptom of celiac, though it is unlikely that this is the case. However, an intolerance hasn't been ruled out by anything in the original post.

    I think people are missing out on the OP's point that the child is often with other family members who are not primal. Better and healthier for everyone to keep the food issues relaxed, IMO, and maintain happy, stress-free family relationships.
    Again, the child eats little or nothing but bread. You are recommending that hkgirl sacrifice her child's health because the family prefers to feed her nothing but bread. I don't think keeping peace with the family is worth abandoning the idea of sane nutrition.

    I also would not even try to offer alternatives if she has asked for bread--just give it to her. She may have already divined that people are going to be difficult if she asks for bread and she may be digging in her heels right from the start.
    It doesn't sound like anybody's being difficult at all about the fact that she wants to eat nothing but bread. It sounds like she is being permitted to choose to eat only bread. In fact, she's learned that if she demands a certain food, adults will provide it for her as much whenever and as much as she wants. This will, if anything, be harder to unlearn later.

  5. #15
    Silvergirl's Avatar
    Silvergirl is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    484
    She is at an awkward age, and I agree with giving it to her but I would explain and respectfully request that relatives do not give her anything but "good" bread, explaining that given that is all she wants to eat it needs to be as nutritional as possible. Hopefully they will understand and respect your wishes. You may have to buy it first and pop it in their freezers though to make it easy and accessible. Maybe a sprouted one? or the like. This phase will pass. My Granddaughter has just been through it, and yes, she would starve and scream rather than eat what you wanted her to eat. She will eat anything now though. Phew!!!! she is now 3.
    Starting Primal June 2012 at 148.5lbs, goal weight in November 2012.
    Now 95lbs and holding.
    Primal, minus eggs, dairy and a myriad of other allergens.

  6. #16
    TCates190's Avatar
    TCates190 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    SoFlo
    Posts
    124
    There's a gluten free bread made with rice flour Called Ener-G it's pretty good and I don't remember there being any scary ingredients.

  7. #17
    murf73's Avatar
    murf73 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    122
    I like to make sandwiches this way. You take a bell pepper and slice it in half and fill it with meat, veggies and cheese.

  8. #18
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    4,873
    Quote Originally Posted by TCates190 View Post
    There's a gluten free bread made with rice flour Called Ener-G it's pretty good and I don't remember there being any scary ingredients.
    OMG, that's nasty stuff. The first time I tried a slice I was like, this would be okay toasted with butter. The next time I tried it I toasted it and buttered it and said, this would be okay toasted and buttered, with cream cheese and raspberry jam. The next time I tried it I toasted it, buttered it, spread on cream cheese and raspberry jam. I threw away the loaf.

    On the rare occasions we want bread we use Udi's bread.

    I think the issue is that the child is not eating a variety of healthy foods. Rather she is eating mostly bread.

  9. #19
    Kochin's Avatar
    Kochin is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Horsham
    Posts
    920
    Potato loaf.
    Make mashed potato. Season. Add 1 heaped tsp baking soda, 1 heaped tsp bicarb and 1.5tsp lemon juice (lemon near the end!) for every 1-2.5kg of bread. Stir in very well, until you see bubbles. Butter-up a tin. Pour the mix in. (It has to be pour-able, not solid! Otherwise it may not rise much.) Leave to rest. Bake at 180-220 degrees until you can insert a knife that comes out clean (or, if you have a temperature-probe, until it hits 90 degrees). I'd say 35min on average for a 1kg loaf, but different tins and different ovens will produce different results, so keep an eye on it!

    Makes a lovely loaf. Unsure whether it's very toast-able, mind...

    PS: The best part is, you can blend in other veggies, to add vitamins and stuff!
    Last edited by Kochin; 03-31-2013 at 09:21 AM.
    --
    Perfection is entirely individual. Any philosophy or pursuit that encourages individuality has merit in that it frees people. Any that encourages shackles only has merit in that it shows you how wrong and desperate the human mind can get in its pursuit of truth.

    --
    I get blunter and more narcissistic by the day.
    I'd apologize, but...

  10. #20
    Zach's Avatar
    Zach is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,869
    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    The child eats little but bread. When she is hungry, she demands bread and refuses anything else.

    Constipation can be a symptom of celiac, though it is unlikely that this is the case. However, an intolerance hasn't been ruled out by anything in the original post.



    Again, the child eats little or nothing but bread. You are recommending that hkgirl sacrifice her child's health because the family prefers to feed her nothing but bread. I don't think keeping peace with the family is worth abandoning the idea of sane nutrition.



    It doesn't sound like anybody's being difficult at all about the fact that she wants to eat nothing but bread. It sounds like she is being permitted to choose to eat only bread. In fact, she's learned that if she demands a certain food, adults will provide it for her as much whenever and as much as she wants. This will, if anything, be harder to unlearn later.
    You must know this child personally to make such assumptions. Otherwise you sound rather ridiculous.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •