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Thread: Konstantin Monastyrsky's Diet Series (Why Diets Fail) page 6

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Yes, Konstantin, "SO" is internet shorthand for "significant other", which is an all inclusive and therefore more politically correct term. It includes spouses, boyfriend/girlfriend, life partners of all possible gender combinations, etc. So, you would be addressing a person whose SO happened to have a more active job as opposed to addressing a woman whose husband has a more active job. Broader relevance that way without the gender stereotypes.
    Paleobird,

    I have a large international following. This particular acronym would not be clear to many people from abroad for the same reasons Brits or Australians don't laugh when they watch Saturday Night Live... But, as I said, I'll edit that section to make it less offensive to people who may find this insensitive. This particular aspect isn't material to the essence of what that post was about.

    Thank you!

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    Paleobird's suggestion to eliminate the gender stereotypes in favor of broader language that applies to everyone is a really good one. I am a huge fan of your work, it has helped me personally and I recommend Fiber Menance and your Gutsense website frequently to others, but I have to admit that reading the bit about a woman with with a police officer husband was really off-putting; many people nowadays are in long-term committed relationships but aren't married (which includes both heterosexual and same-sex relationships) and I think women are just as likely to have active jobs as men.

    Even for women who have traditional jobs like teaching or nursing, there is a lot of walking and running around; as a teacher, I routinely walked 7+ miles a day (I wore a pedometer to check) and went up and down 30+ flights of stairs just in the course of commuting and being at work. That doesn't even take into account all the movement I did once my work day was over.

    Very few people live the 'husband go out to work and wife stay home' situation you used as your example, which I think has the unintended consequence of alienating a big chunk of your audience.
    BestBetter,

    Thank you very much for recommending GutSense and Fiber Menace. The points you are making about gender equality are on the money. I'll change that post to a more neutral text. Didn't expect that particular subject to steer so many emotions. Better do it now than when the book it out.

    Thank you again,

    Konstantin

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by magicmerl View Post
    The article is pretty good, but I'm not so sure about this:


    My understanding is that your adipose tissue take energy too, so any increase in fat would also increase you BEE, not lower it. Obese people have a higher BEE than normal weight people.

    Am I wrong here?
    Magicmerl,

    Every tissue takes energy to keep the body warm and to prevent fats from solidifying. However, the body temperature, depends on the individual. Some people have incredible thermogenesis, some don't. In general, most overweight people don't, especially past middle age, because of circulatory problems. Also, high thermogenesis excites appetite like no other factor.

    And when you come across of an overweight person with a profuse perspiration -- it has more to do with the overheating of his/her internal organs than with high thermogenesis from exact same "thermos effect." In other words, intense perspiration doesn't necessarily mean a high degree of thermogenesis.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    This is my understanding too, which is why my 300 lb colleague is constantly complaining about being too warm, always sweating, and literally warms up the room for everyone else when he enters.
    This is a "thermos effect" in action related to your colleague weight. His sweating or perception of warms doesn't not necessarily reflect significantly higher body temperature. That is why obese people have a significantly higher risk of becoming the victims of heatstrokes: Heavy people may collapse more in heat wave - Health - Health care - More health news | NBC News. As I said earlier, vascular (circulation) problems play a role in this too.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmonastyrsky View Post
    Magicmerl,

    Every tissue takes energy to keep the body warm and to prevent fats from solidifying. However, the body temperature, depends on the individual. Some people have incredible thermogenesis, some don't. In general, most overweight people don't, especially past middle age, because of circulatory problems. Also, high thermogenesis excites appetite like no other factor.

    And when you come across of an overweight person with a profuse perspiration -- it has more to do with the overheating of his/her internal organs than with high thermogenesis from exact same "thermos effect." In other words, intense perspiration doesn't necessarily mean a high degree of thermogenesis.
    Thermogenesis is literally the heat your body makes. How can overweight people with with poor thermogenesis be overheating and too hot? This seems like a contradiction in terms. The overweight people either be cold with poor thermogenesis or they can be overheating and have high thermogenesis.

    I'm not saying you're wrong, but you seem to be using definitions of words that don't quite match my understanding of those words.
    Last edited by magicmerl; 04-03-2013 at 07:40 PM.
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

    Griff's cholesterol primer
    5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
    Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
    TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
    bloodorchid is always right

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by magicmerl View Post
    Thermogenesis is literally the heat your body makes. How can overweight people with with poor thermogenesis be overheating and too hot? This seems like a contradiction in terms. The overweight people either be cold with poor thermogenesis or they can be overheating and have high thermogenesis.
    There is no such as thing as "poor" thermogenesis, and that was not the subject of discussion. The subject of discussion was the "thermos effect," and my statement that this effect may reduce thermogenesis because when the body is covered with a blanket of fat [to keep internal organs warm], it can lower "effective" thermogenesis, and reduce energy consumption accordingly.

    The thermogenesis of a healthy person operates in a fairly narrow corridor from about 35.5 C to 37 C, with "normal" median being 36.6 C. But that spread in 1.5 degree is quite significant in terms of energy use when calculated over 24 hours period, something along the lines of gas usage when doing 55 mph and 65 over 1000 miles stretch.

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    Sorry, not 'poor' thermogenesis. Lower (but effective) thermogenesis.

    So you're saying that a subcutaneous layer of fat is effectively acting as insulation that prevents you from radiating heat away, in the same way that a jersey keeps you warm and stops you from burning fat to warm yourself up? That kinda makes sense, but wouldn't it mean that fat people have a *colder* skin, because the fat under their skin is blocking heat dissipation?

    I always thought that fat people were hotter because of their bigger surface-area to volume ratio (bigger people have a smaller surface area to volume ratio). But that mechanism seems the polar opposite of the thermos effect.
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

    Griff's cholesterol primer
    5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
    Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
    TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
    bloodorchid is always right

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