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Thread: What Annie did next.

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  1. #1
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    What Annie did next.

    Nine months ago I overhauled my diet according to the primal blueprint. A few months prior, I started an exercise routine. A few months later, together with a friend, I began making regular tramps out in the bush.

    The results have been all I wished for and more. I am healthier, happier, fitter, and slimmer than ever and I have maintained this status for months.

    So, I ask myself, where to from here? What should be my new goals, now that I have achieved what I set out to do?

    A few areas I think I could explore include:

    Branching out diet-wise. I rarely eat fish. Liver and offal have been no-go areas so far. Meat and veges come from the supermarket for the most part - not my neighbour's farm or my own garden. I'd love to find a source of organic whole milk.

    Branching out exercise-wise. I've never done a community walk or run. There are fabulous bike routes and tramping tracks in our country that I've not experienced yet. There are no doubt new activities waiting to be tried.

    Branching out fashion-wise. Now that I actually like the way clothes hang on me, I might try paying a bit more attention to what I wear. I'm not sure my clothes adequately express my personality in the way they could.

    Other areas of life. With my newfound energy I should be able to tackle some things I've been putting off. Getting my garden under control and productive. Decorating my house. Finding time for new interests and friends.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
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    The veg garden will definitely take up some of your time.... particularly if you have an area that is overgrown and needs to be "tamed" to be productive. To go along with the garden, you may want to build a compost pile to help with the fertilization of your new/renewed garden.
    The garden will also help re-enforce your dietary choices..... fresh veggies are sooo much better than the stuff bought at the supermarket. You can pick the varieties of veg that you want, you can learn to hybridize your favorites and save the seed. That is a long term project in itself... since you wouldn't be able to see the results of the cross polinization until the following season.

    good luck in your branching out! sounds like you have a whole new sets of adventure coming your way!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssn679doc View Post
    The veg garden will definitely take up some of your time.... particularly if you have an area that is overgrown and needs to be "tamed" to be productive. To go along with the garden, you may want to build a compost pile to help with the fertilization of your new/renewed garden.
    The garden will also help re-enforce your dietary choices..... fresh veggies are sooo much better than the stuff bought at the supermarket. You can pick the varieties of veg that you want, you can learn to hybridize your favorites and save the seed. That is a long term project in itself... since you wouldn't be able to see the results of the cross polinization until the following season.

    good luck in your branching out! sounds like you have a whole new sets of adventure coming your way!
    Thanks for the encouragement, Doc. I'm actually pretty good at making compost already, but seed saving sounds like pretty hardcore gardening to me.

    I'm generally a buy the punnet of seedlings, pop them in the ground and hope for the best type gardener. It sometimes works.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    Thanks for the encouragement, Doc. I'm actually pretty good at making compost already, but seed saving sounds like pretty hardcore gardening to me.

    I'm generally a buy the punnet of seedlings, pop them in the ground and hope for the best type gardener. It sometimes works.
    lol... seed saving is a little more advanced gardening.... but just like weight loss and fitness, once you reach one goal or level of proficiency, you may find that it becomes your next step in the progression.... I'm not there yet, though I have started learning how to start my plants from seed...

  5. #5
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    What is the best vegetables recipes for weight loss? I don't want to eat anything raw. I'm having hard time to chew it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by camillesmith View Post
    What is the best vegetables recipes for weight loss? I don't want to eat anything raw. I'm having hard time to chew it.
    Camille, I think it's fine to have your vegetables cooked and I'm sure there are many more appealing recipes than cabbage soup.

    The best approach I found for weight loss was to focus on the protein part of my meal. So eggs, or fish, or meat. Sometimes I grill my meat in the oven, other times sear it in a pan then leave in the slow cooker all day.

    For vegetables, anything goes. For weight loss you probably want to steer away from too many potatoes at the moment but otherwise use lots and lots of different ones. For example you can steam leeks or silverbeet and layer with grated cheese. Or sauté onions, mushrooms, broccoli and bake into a quiche or omelette. Bake pumpkin and mash with coconut cream and nutmeg. Just to give you a few ideas.

    Carrots and cauliflower are easy to cook and eat too, you can steam them, stir fry in olive oil, or roast in the oven in the fat drippings from your meat.

    The main thing with this lifestyle is to eat whole unprocessed foods and to avoid grains and seed oils. Good luck Camille.
    Last edited by Annieh; 09-09-2015 at 05:12 PM.

  7. #7
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    Feeling Thankful

    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    Camille, I think it's fine to have your vegetables cooked and I'm sure there are many more appealing recipes than cabbage soup.

    The best approach I found for weight loss was to focus on the protein part of my meal. So eggs, or fish, or meat. Sometimes I grill my meat in the oven, other times sear it in a pan then leave in the slow cooker all day.

    For vegetables, anything goes. For weight loss you probably want to steer away from too many potatoes at the moment but otherwise use lots and lots of different ones. For example you can steam leeks or silverbeet and layer with grated cheese. Or sauté onions, mushrooms, broccoli and bake into a quiche or omelette. Bake pumpkin and mash with coconut cream and nutmeg. Just to give you a few ideas.

    Carrots and cauliflower are easy to cook and eat too, you can steam them, stir fry in olive oil, or roast in the oven in the fat drippings from your meat.

    The main thing with this lifestyle is to eat whole unprocessed foods and to avoid grains and seed oils. Good luck Camille.
    Thank you so much for your input. I enjoy reading about what you said and you are right. I guess I just figured out for myself what is best food for me. I just need to explore the vegetable around the market and experiment it.

  8. #8
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    Branching out diet-wise. I rarely eat fish. Liver and offal have been no-go areas so far. Meat and veges come from the supermarket for the most part - not my neighbour's farm or my own garden. I'd love to find a source of organic whole milk.
    Oh yes, this is a wonderful area to explore, and Primal brought me back to loving food again rather than the love/hate relationship I'd had for years.

    Fish for beginners. Salmon is very mild and one of the best sources of O3s out there. It can be baked or poached; some people grill or pan fry the fillets. Though it can be dressed up, just a little lemon and butter is really all it needs to be scrumptious. Dill and sour cream or yogurt also work. Salmon also comes in cans, but once you have fresh, it's hard to go back to canned. (Like the difference between sushi grade tuna and that nasty tuna in cans.)

    Oysters. The only time I'll eat these raw is when I can watch them being shucked and put on my plate, but that's spendy even if it is a good time. Very mild and perfect with a squirt of lemon and some hot sauce. When I buy them at the grocery store already shucked, I either lightly dredge them in a primal flour and egg and then pan fry them, or I make a chowder of some kind. Very decadent stuff. If you can find smoked oysters in cans, they're wonderful, but I can't find any locally that don't have weird ingredients.

    Shrimp and crawfish - I think in NZ you all have the larger crayfish. Find a recipe for "fish boil" or "shrimp boil" which is just a big old pot of water with a lot of spices. Once it's boiling, put in your fish. Remove shrimp when they turn pink, craw/crayfish when they turn bright orange/red. Serve shrimp with melted butter or homemade mayonnaise; if the crawfish are spicy enough (I like them to make my eyes tear), just start pulling off the heads and eating their little bodies. Do be brave and suck out the heads - sounds gross, but it's like some natural spicy sea butter. If you want to use shrimp in stir fries, you have a bit of cleaning to do (or pay extra and buy them cleaned), and put them in after all your veggies are moments from done - once they're pink, they're done.

    Sardines. If you have access to fresh, I envy you. Here, fresh are stupidly expensive. Most fish in cans (except for our American pasteurized tuna) are pretty intense, so to start you might want to use them as toppings or side dishes with blander foods. From what I've read, the little briesling sardines are more intensely flavored than the bigger pudgy ones. Sardines are also a good source of O3s.

    Herring. I don't see this mentioned on the forums too much. You can find these already kippered or pickled. And while I don't know if this is a universal thing, pickled herring in sour cream is food of the gods.

    I haven't explored offal too much yet because I've been comfortable just eating chicken livers all my life. Chicken heart and gizzards are a big thing in the South, where they bread and fry them. I have to say that after a few drinks, deep fried gizzards are very nice. I do have a cow's tongue (not really an organ, but still considered offal) and a beef heart in my freezer. As soon as my pickling spices arrive, I'll start on the tongue. I'm squeamish about the beef heart, but I'll get over it as soon as I find a recipe that appeals.

    Good luck on your new explorations and adventures!
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    Oh yes, this is a wonderful area to explore, and Primal brought me back to loving food again rather than the love/hate relationship I'd had for years.

    Fish for beginners. Salmon is very mild and one of the best sources of O3s out there. It can be baked or poached; some people grill or pan fry the fillets. Though it can be dressed up, just a little lemon and butter is really all it needs to be scrumptious. Good luck on your new explorations and adventures!
    Thanks Joanie, I've tried this with salmon once and today I bought myself a piece of snapper for brunch. I panfried in butter and served with lemon, salt and parsley. It was pretty good. So I've made a start.

  10. #10
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    Offal: my parents took me out for Brazilian when I visited them at Christmas. I had these amazingly delicious skewers of chicken hearts. They were slightly chewy and tasted more like red meat than chicken. I couldn't stop thinking about them, and then this week I recreated them at home: chicken hearts simmered in butter and its own juices for about 35 minutes. They look like baby thumbs and go down like popcorn. I am an offal-beginner and I recommend this dish.
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