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  1. #221
    Annieh's Avatar
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    First of all, what I didn't do today was eat breakfast. Also I didn't get hungry - or at least not hungry enough to notice - till 1pm. Then I cooked up a big brunch stack: pumpkin and egg pancake, mushrooms, silverbeet and a piece of hoki with tandoori spices. It was A. Maze. Ing. Cafe style food for less than price of a pie. I finished off with a few grapes and pieces of dark chocolate.

    What I did do was plant a dozen red cabbages and about two dozen onions. That sounds like way too many cabbages and not enough onions (since I can easily use one a day). But it's a start and I sincerely hope the chooks don't get them.

    I kind of shamed myself into the gardening spree because I actually bought silverbeet today. This is shocking, no way should I - feeble gardener though I may be - have to part with my dh's hard-earned cash to purchase silverbeet. Or even pumpkin. Both grow sooooooooo easily here there is simply no excuse. I do in fact have a few silverbeet plants in, but they are not quite ready and I have been missing it, even though I have been enjoying the leeks.

    Chickens have produced 42 eggs in 23 days, or average of 1.8 per day.

  2. #222
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    First of all, what I didn't do today was eat breakfast. Also I didn't get hungry - or at least not hungry enough to notice - till 1pm. Then I cooked up a big brunch stack: pumpkin and egg pancake, mushrooms, silverbeet and a piece of hoki with tandoori spices. It was A. Maze. Ing. Cafe style food for less than price of a pie. I finished off with a few grapes and pieces of dark chocolate.

    What I did do was plant a dozen red cabbages and about two dozen onions. That sounds like way too many cabbages and not enough onions (since I can easily use one a day). But it's a start and I sincerely hope the chooks don't get them.

    I kind of shamed myself into the gardening spree because I actually bought silverbeet today. This is shocking, no way should I - feeble gardener though I may be - have to part with my dh's hard-earned cash to purchase silverbeet. Or even pumpkin. Both grow sooooooooo easily here there is simply no excuse. I do in fact have a few silverbeet plants in, but they are not quite ready and I have been missing it, even though I have been enjoying the leeks.

    Chickens have produced 42 eggs in 23 days, or average of 1.8 per day.
    A dozen red cabbage may be plenty, depending on what you use them for. We usually only use them in salads, so a head lasts a while. If you only eat 1 head per week, that is 12 weeks worth of cabbage once they are mature. They are cold hardy, and can tolerate light frost, so you can leave them in the garden all winter.

  3. #223
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    Thanks Doc, yes that's what I figured. One head a week would be ample if they last in the garden that long. I don't mind red cabbage but if they all mature at once I'll be snowed under. I like them in warm meat dishes eg with lamb chops or pork chops.

  4. #224
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    Thanks Doc, yes that's what I figured. One head a week would be ample if they last in the garden that long. I don't mind red cabbage but if they all mature at once I'll be snowed under. I like them in warm meat dishes eg with lamb chops or pork chops.
    Thats the neat thing about winter gardens.. is that everything grows sooooooo slow, that once they "mature" they grow slowly enough in winter that they won't get "over ripe"..... AND you don't have to worry about all the nasty bugs that infest cabbages in the warmer tiems of the year...

  5. #225
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    Thanks for the encouragement. Well, they're in now and all I have to do is wait.

    I might put some garlic in next, last year I grew elephant garlic, it was very easy and successful.

  6. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    Thanks for the encouragement. Well, they're in now and all I have to do is wait.

    I might put some garlic in next, last year I grew elephant garlic, it was very easy and successful.
    Yup, garlic is an easy crop to grow..... Do you have any root crops planted? I have grown turnips, rutabaga/swedes, carrots, and beets in winter. The carrots get very sweet over the winter... which makes them especially yummy!

  7. #227
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    If you like reading about gardening, I think Eliot Coleman would be a great sorce of information for you. He has several books out, specifically you may find his books on gardening in winter and on year round gardening interesting. He is a pretty big name in the organing circles here in the states.

  8. #228
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    No root crops in yet, I have had only limited success with carrots in the past but I do use a lot of them so would be worth having.

    Thanks for the book recommendation, I will seek it out.

  9. #229
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    Dinner: Roast pork with crackling, pear puree and feijoa and ginger jam.
    Roast root veges: Carrot, parsnip, kumara, beetroot.


    Snack earlier was muesli with milk and cream. Even though non-primal (oats and peanuts), it tasted good and really filled me up.

  10. #230
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    Tasty! Very few things in life are better than pork crackle, I reckon

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