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Thread: Primal Journey (Cryptocode) page 3

  1. #21
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by Annieh View Post
    Oh no, now you'll have to carry on with primal, you've been spoiled for anything else. Hope you can find something wholesome to pique your appetite.
    I'm stuck here. It's got me coming and going. Then I read Mark's blog today, fantastic, a new GM wheat, untested, that can kill us, or a world with no men - and no reproduction. Maybe the gay's will be happy at least but somehow I don't think so.
    Is there some way I can just step off the world for a while?

  2. #22
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    Anxiolytics

    An anxiolytic (also antipanic or antianxiety agent) is a drug that inhibits anxiety. Some recreational drugs like alcoholic beverages (ethanol) induce anxiolysis. Anxiolytic medications have been used for the treatment of anxiety and its related psychological and physical symptoms. Anxiolytics have been shown to be useful in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Anxiolytics are also known as minor tranquilizers. The term is less common in modern texts, and was originally derived from a dichotomy with major tranquilizers, also known as neuroleptics or antipsychotics.

    Herbal treatments

    Certain natural substances are reputed to have anxiolytic properties, including the following:
    • Bacopa monnieri (Brahmi)
    • Lactuca virosa (Opium Lettuce)
    • Rhodiola rosea (Arctic Weed/Golden Root)
    • Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort)
    • Matricaria recutita (German Chamomile)
    • Passiflora
    • Piper methysticum (Kava)
    • Sceletium tortuosum (Kanna)
    • Scutellaria spp. (Skullcap)
    o Scutellaria lateriflora
    • Valeriana officinalis (Valerian)
    • Salvia splendens (Not to be confused with Salvia divinorum)
    • Coriandrum sativum (Coriander)
    • Myristica (Nutmeg)
    • Salvia elegans (Pineapple Sage)
    • Inositol. In a double-blind, controlled trial, myo-inositol (18 grams daily) was superior to fluvoxamine for decreasing the number of panic attacks and had fewer side-effects.
    • Cannabidiol (a cannabinoid found in marijuana)
    • L-Theanine – extracted from severeal different plants.
    • Rhodiola Rosea (rose root)
    • magnolia officinalis (Magnolia Bark
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 04-10-2013 at 10:15 PM.

  3. #23
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    Valerian

    Valerian, in pharmacology and herbal medicine, is the name of a herb or dietary supplement prepared from roots of the plant. Crude extract of the root is often sold in the form of capsules. Valerian root is purported to possess sedative and anxiolytic effects. It can also be classified as a drug, since its consumption produces a sedative or medicinal effect, while it is not exclusively a type of food. These effects are suspected to be mediated through the GABA receptor. The amino acid valine is named after this plant.

    Biochemical composition - Known compounds detected in valerian that may contribute to its method of action are:
    • Alkaloids: actinidine, chatinine, shyanthine, valerianine, and valerine.
    • Isovaleramide may be created in the extraction process.
    • Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).
    • Isovaleric acid.
    • Iridoids, including valepotriates: isovaltrate and valtrate.
    • Sesquiterpenes (contained in the Volatile oil): valerenic acid, hydroxyvalerenic acid and acetoxyvalerenic acid.
    • Flavanones: hesperidin, 6-methylapigenin and linarin.

    Preparation
    Valeriana officinalis
    The chief constituent of valerian is a yellowish-green to brownish-yellow oil which is present in the dried root, varying from 0.5 to 2.0 percent, though an average yield rarely exceeds 0.8 percent. This variation in quantity is partly explained by location; a dry, stony soil, yields a root richer in oil than one that is moist and fertile. The volatile oils that form the active ingredient are extremely pungent, somewhat reminiscent of well-matured cheese. Though some people remain partial to the earthy scent, some may find it to be unpleasant, comparing the odor to that of unwashed feet. Valerian tea should not be prepared with boiling water, as this may drive off the lighter oils.

    Medicinal use
    Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) essential oil in a clear glass vial
    Valerian is most often used to treat insomnia. It can be considered an alternative treatment instead of hypnotic drugs. It is also sometimes used as an alternative for sedatives, such as benzodiazapines in the treatment of certain anxiety disorders.
    One systematic review and meta-analysis published in 2006 in the American Journal of Medicine concluded that, "The available evidence suggests that valerian might improve sleep quality without producing side effects." However, another systematic review, published in 2007 in the journal Sleep Medicine Review, concluded that valerian was safe but not clinically efficacious for insomnia.

    Dosage
    Dosage is difficult to determine due to the lack of standardization and variability in available forms. The United States government's National Institutes of Health recommends a dose of 400 - 900 mg taken between 30 minutes and 2 hours before bed, or a lesser dose when combined with certain other supplements. Valerian root is nontoxic, but may cause side effects when taken in large doses.

    Adverse effects
    Few adverse events attributable to valerian have been reported. Large doses may result in stomach ache, apathy, and a feeling of mental dullness or mild depression. Because of the herb's tranquilizer properties, it may cause dizziness or drowsiness, effects that should be considered before driving or operating heavy or hazardous equipment.
    In rare cases, valerian may cause an allergic reaction, typically as a skin rash, hives, or difficulty breathing.
    Because the compounds in valerian produce central nervous system depression, they should not be used with other depressants, such as alcohol, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, opiates, kava, or antihistamine drugs. Moreover, non-pregnant adult human hepatotoxicity has been associated with short-term use (i.e., a few days to several months) of herbal preparations containing valerian and Scutellaria (commonly called skullcap). Withdrawal after long-term use in a male has also been associated with benzodiazepine-like withdrawal symptoms, resulting in cardiac complications and delirium.
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 04-09-2013 at 09:22 PM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by namelesswonder View Post
    That is a surprising response to 5-HTP, never heard of that before. I've never had any digestive issues with it.

    L-Tryptophan was recalled in the early 90's, if I recall correctly from the book "The Mood Cure", because of a bad batch that had been corrupted by something else. I have taken it instead of 5-HTP for help with my anxiety and depression, but I take it in the morning instead of night. I don't know if it helps with the sleep or not, but I imagine it would.

    I'm starting a colostrum powder as a supplement today. I'll let you know how it goes.
    Thanks Tasha, I was looking for information on that recall, I remember it. I had a partially used bottle I'd been taking as a sleep-aid and quit using it. Ha Ha, I found the bottle but I couldn't remember why it was recalled. It did work well for me as a sleep-aid.

    Because I couldn't find the information I tried Valerian Root instead. That really works, and makes me rather 'uncaring' today. 750mg is the size of the capsule and is probably too much for me. (The 'uncaring' is kinda nice though.) I'll try a smaller dose if I can find one. Cutting capsules in 1/2 is not wonderfully successful. It also gave me a headache and groggyness.

    What are you taking the colostrum for?
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 04-07-2013 at 05:24 PM.

  5. #25
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    Valerian Root worked. I slept and there was no stomach upset or discomfort this morning (so far).

    B - 2 bacon, 2 eggs
    L - greens sauteed in CO, Lamb left-over
    D - liver w bacon & onions, broccoli
    - - - - - - -
    3 Probiotic, 3 Omega-3, a packet Damage Control, 2 Glucosamine, 1 iron, L-Tryptophane

    The MOM did work, but the same as last time; things are not well in there.

    I talked to our new neighbor next door. She'll sell us eggs from her grass-fed chickens. I asked for a dozen every 4 days; might have to adjust that depending on their size. She asked for $1.50. That's way to low in this area.

    I enjoyed Mark's (referenced) blog on old-fashioned food preparation. I linked it. That's going to be helpful.

    I cancelled the upcoming colonoscopy and rescheduled for late June. I hope I'm better by then.
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 04-08-2013 at 06:43 PM.

  6. #26
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    I'm trying the colostrum for my constipation. Hoping it will also alleviate my suddenly much stronger seasonal allergies. I suspect my poor gut health is directly linked to that, unless we're having a particularly high pollen count so far this season.
    Journal on depression/anxiety
    Currently trying to figure out WTF to eat (for IBS-C).

  7. #27
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    The L-tryptophane did work, sorta. I went to sleep then was awake from 4 - 6, then asleep from 6 - 9. That's not really a good sleep but a lot better than none.

    My colon is coming back slowly.

    B - 2 bacon, 2 eggs
    L - refried beans & chile quesadea swimming in greece, w taco chips & salsa at our nearby Mex. Rest.
    D -
    - - - - -
    3 Probiotic, 3 Omega-3, a packet Damage Control, 2 Glucosamine, 1 iron, L-tryptophane
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 04-09-2013 at 09:34 PM.

  8. #28
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    Nameless, what is the bio-chemical connection between gut problems and allergies, unless you mean that gut problems cause allergies, which it clearly does. How did the antibiotics go, are you still on them? What are you taking with them, if anything?

  9. #29
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    Yes, I mean gut problems cause allergies.

    I have two doses of the antibiotic left. My toes are still inflamed, though they were better for a while last week. I'm wearing sandals as much as possible this week and dousing my toes in tea tree oil. My doctor wanted me to make an appointment with a dermatologist, but there are usually long waiting periods to see one. I should call my insurance and find a local office today =\. I'm a little surprised that my digestion has not been affected by the antibiotic.

    Do you mean supplements or food? I have just been taking it in the morning with breakfast, no extra supplements, though I'm considering a round of grapefruit seed extract. It's good for infections, even when taken internally. Who knows, maybe it would help.
    Journal on depression/anxiety
    Currently trying to figure out WTF to eat (for IBS-C).

  10. #30
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    Hi Nameless, I thought you would be taking probiotics with the antibiotics, yes? I'm guessing not. I was wondering how or if the antibiotics affected the bad bacteria you were worried about.

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