Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Insulin and hypoglycemia - VLC vs PHD page 2

  1. #11
    Derpamix's Avatar
    Derpamix is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    5,386
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by Future_PB_Dr View Post
    Is hypoglycemia often accompanied by adrenal fatigue? I would imagine it would be stressful on your adrenal cortex and medulla to be releasing cortisol and epi so often to stimulate gluconeogenesis. Could this adrenal fatigue be related to hypoglycemia? Perhaps your adrenal glands become so fatigued that they are no longer able to efficiently stimulate gluconeogenesis (through hormones), so the same insulin release in response to a meal will be directing the same amount of gluconeogenesis-derived glucose into your cells, but from a smaller pool of this glucose, thus leading to less in your bloodstream, ala hypoglycemia. Does this sound like a probable mechanism? I am just thinking out loud.

    Edit: I guess a better first question would be: is adrenal fatigue often accompanied by hypoglycemia?
    Decreased blood sugar is a basic signal for the release of adrenal hormones, but the symptoms of adrenal fatigue are more likely problems with thyroid.
    Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant

  2. #12
    BestBetter's Avatar
    BestBetter is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NY / Italy
    Posts
    1,210
    Quote Originally Posted by Future_PB_Dr View Post

    Edit: I guess a better first question would be: is adrenal fatigue often accompanied by hypoglycemia?
    According to what I've read about adrenal fatigue (including the book, Adrenal Fatigue: 21st Century Stress Syndrome by Dr. Wilson), people with adrenal fatigue are usually hypoglycemic.

    That said, my husband and I recently took saliva cortisol tests, and our cortisol patterns are WAY off - low in the morning, high at night, which is the opposite of what they should be, and is the classic pattern in adrenal fatigue (you can call it whatever you want if you don't like the term 'adrenal fatigue' but having a deranged cortisol pattern is a concrete, measurable problem that exists).

    Neither of us are hypoglycemic. We both have perfect fasting glucose numbers and can either eat sugary foods or fast for a day without a problem. So even though those two health conditions tend to have a comorbidity, there are probably lots of people like us who have one issue but not the other.

    And while you could argue that my adrenal issues are possibly thyroid related, my husband has no signs of any thyroid issues; in fact, he runs hot (has a normal body temp, always kicking off the covers because he's hot even if I'm cold) and has a wicked high metabolism (he's a hardgainer).
    Last edited by BestBetter; 03-27-2013 at 08:01 AM.

  3. #13
    Paleobird's Avatar
    Paleobird Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    O
    Derp isn't the one to ask about adrenal fatigue. He doesn't believe in it.
    He's also on the Primal Hummingbird Diet.

  4. #14
    Derpamix's Avatar
    Derpamix is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    5,386
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    He's also on the Primal Hummingbird Diet.
    I'll drink your nectar any time
    Longing is the agony of the nearness of the distant

  5. #15
    Zach's Avatar
    Zach is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,869
    Lool.

  6. #16
    noodletoy's Avatar
    noodletoy is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    land of the glass pinecones
    Posts
    2,879
    insulin is released every single time we eat. it doesn't "just" react to carbohydrates.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

  7. #17
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Future_PB_Dr View Post
    Okay, I have a question for you science folk to ponder.

    I listened to a podcast today, Jimmy Moore's LLVLC, in which he was speaking of his experience with hypoglycemia after a long stint of a VLC WOE. His postprandial glucose was lower than his fasting blood glucose despite ingesting VLC meals.

    This made me begin to make connections in my head, not answers, but connections. I next thought of another podcast I had listened to a couple weeks back, "The Fat Burning Man" featuring host Abel James and Paul Jaminet, author of The Perfect Health Diet (PHD). Jaminet stated (I am going off memory) something along the lines of it being necessary to stimulate insulin so that your cells remain sensitive and know how to deal with glucose.

    And this brought me to my question, could VLC eating lead to hypoglycemia because the gluconeogenesis derived glucose causes the glucose spike in your blood, but your body, over time, doesn't know how to deal with the glucose? I understand the flaw in this question: protein intake will always lead to gluconeogenesis and raised blood glucose and thus insulin secretion. Yet, I am just curious if the body becomes deficient in its ability to deal with blood sugar spikes from gluconeogenesis due to VLC eating over time?

    What are your thoughts?
    These are very good questions and I think not all the answers are known. There is a fairly well-documented phenomenon in low carb eating that FBG will rise over time. I have seen this explained this occurs because your liver is providing all your glucose and since it gets there unaccompanied by food, the insulin response is not in proportion to the amount of glucose produced during the night. Once you eat in the morning, a normal insulin response ensues and blood glucose levels return to normal.

    Whether or not this scenario describes insulin resistance is anybody's guess. I think the more common insulin resistance occurs when someone overfeeds continually. Eating sugary/starchy food all day long even when not hungry causes all kinds of metabolic problems, including insulin resistance, over time.

    The last part of your question:
    And this brought me to my question, could VLC eating lead to hypoglycemia because the gluconeogenesis derived glucose causes the glucose spike in your blood, but your body, over time, doesn't know how to deal with the glucose? I understand the flaw in this question: protein intake will always lead to gluconeogenesis and raised blood glucose and thus insulin secretion. Yet, I am just curious if the body becomes deficient in its ability to deal with blood sugar spikes from gluconeogenesis due to VLC eating over time?
    I think is highly unlikely and I have never seen this described. Hypoglycemia is very unlikely in LC eating. Even in cases of prolonged starvation, the body will maintain a certain level of glucose, well above a hypoglycemic level, right up until death.

    Here is a good article on insulin you may find useful:
    Insulin Levels and Fat Loss | BodyRecomposition - The Home of Lyle McDonald

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •