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  1. #11
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    Pork loin with all the fat trimmed has 31 calories per ounce and 7.7 gms of protein.
    7.7 gms x 4 cal per gram = 30.8 calories.
    That makes pork loin with all the fat trimmed about 99.3% protein calorically.

    95/5 ground beef has 38 calories per ounce and 7.4 grams of protein.
    7.4 gms x 4 calories per gram = 29.6 calories.
    Which makes 95/5 ground beef 78% protein and 22% fat calorically (not accounting for water in the product).
    But your butcher isn't lying to you, s/he is using 95/5 by weight, not calories.

    One problem with statements like “most meats are roughly 50% protein, 50% fat" is that there isn't a qualifier. 50% of what? Weight? Calories? And if it's weight, is there no water in this meat - there is, which is why most meat weighs less after cooking.

    There are approximately 28 grams in an ounce (28.3). Using 50/50 by weight, a hypothetical product with no water would have:

    14 grams of protein x 4 calories per gram = 56 calories
    14 grams of fat x 9 calories per gram = 126 calories
    For a total of 28 grams of product with 182 calories

    Working backwards, let’s say I gave you a portion of a product and told you that it had 182 calories per portion. And that it is 50/50 by calorie. Now we have:

    91 calories from protein / 4 cal per gram = 22.75 grams of protein
    91 calories from fat / 9 cal per gram = 10.1 grams of fat
    And it’s larger now at almost 1.2 oz.

    IOW, the ratio of protein to fat by weight has gone from 1:1 to a bit over 2:1.

    Anyway, I know most won’t have read this whole thing, but there are a few things to know in a world where we juggle grams and ounces:

    -There are about 28.3 grams in an ounce.
    -100 grams is about 3½ ounces.
    -Protein and carbs are approximately 4 calories per gram. Fat is about 9 calories per gram.
    -When a meat claims to be ‘only’ 5% fat, it is by weight, not calories.
    -There is water in animal flesh, which is why the calories may seem to not add up, and also why, if you count calories, you should try to use raw weight as often as possible.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  2. #12
    girlhk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damiana View Post
    I don't think there are any seriously ill effects to eating more protein than recommended. If you like what you're currently eating, keep at it.
    I like what I'm eating.

    I've always heard that too much protein is hard on the body, especially the kidneys, makes you age faster, etc. Just wondering how much of that is true...

  3. #13
    girlhk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    When I eat much more than my target protein, I put on weight, even if I am running a significant calorie deficit.
    Why do you think that is?

  4. #14
    girlhk's Avatar
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    Thanks for this explanation. Very clear.

    I use raw weights when I enter the foods into the tracker.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    Pork loin with all the fat trimmed has 31 calories per ounce and 7.7 gms of protein.
    7.7 gms x 4 cal per gram = 30.8 calories.
    That makes pork loin with all the fat trimmed about 99.3% protein calorically.

    95/5 ground beef has 38 calories per ounce and 7.4 grams of protein.
    7.4 gms x 4 calories per gram = 29.6 calories.
    Which makes 95/5 ground beef 78% protein and 22% fat calorically (not accounting for water in the product).
    But your butcher isn't lying to you, s/he is using 95/5 by weight, not calories.

    One problem with statements like “most meats are roughly 50% protein, 50% fat" is that there isn't a qualifier. 50% of what? Weight? Calories? And if it's weight, is there no water in this meat - there is, which is why most meat weighs less after cooking.

    There are approximately 28 grams in an ounce (28.3). Using 50/50 by weight, a hypothetical product with no water would have:

    14 grams of protein x 4 calories per gram = 56 calories
    14 grams of fat x 9 calories per gram = 126 calories
    For a total of 28 grams of product with 182 calories

    Working backwards, let’s say I gave you a portion of a product and told you that it had 182 calories per portion. And that it is 50/50 by calorie. Now we have:

    91 calories from protein / 4 cal per gram = 22.75 grams of protein
    91 calories from fat / 9 cal per gram = 10.1 grams of fat
    And it’s larger now at almost 1.2 oz.

    IOW, the ratio of protein to fat by weight has gone from 1:1 to a bit over 2:1.

    Anyway, I know most won’t have read this whole thing, but there are a few things to know in a world where we juggle grams and ounces:

    -There are about 28.3 grams in an ounce.
    -100 grams is about 3½ ounces.
    -Protein and carbs are approximately 4 calories per gram. Fat is about 9 calories per gram.
    -When a meat claims to be ‘only’ 5% fat, it is by weight, not calories.
    -There is water in animal flesh, which is why the calories may seem to not add up, and also why, if you count calories, you should try to use raw weight as often as possible.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by magicmerl View Post
    Keep in mind that most meats are roughly 50% protein, 50% fat.
    Yes. Meat which is about 18% fat is going to be 50% fat by calories.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlhk View Post
    Why do you think that is?
    I've given up trying to figure it out, or denying that it happens. I just need to keep up a moderate protein intake every day so I don't go crazy with it and binge later.

    Having thought about it, I feel like it is actually muscle I am putting on, rather than fat. However, it is not immediately accompanied by an increase in strength.
    Last edited by eKatherine; 03-27-2013 at 08:09 PM.

  7. #17
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    Those calorie tracking apps use government data so they're always going to tell you that you get way too much fat, cholesterol and protein in your diet.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 170 x 3. Current Deadlift: 220 x 3

  8. #18
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    I'm the opposite of eKatherine - higher protein seems to make me lose better, even given close to the same calories. Not sure why except everyone's different.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlhk View Post
    I've always heard that too much protein is hard on the body, especially the kidneys, makes you age faster, etc. Just wondering how much of that is true...
    Re kidneys

    "If I wanted to cut to the chase I could boil this whole thing down to the following:

    1-Dietary protein DOES NOT CAUSE KIDNEY DAMAGE.

    2-Chronically elevated BLOOD GLUCOSE levels DO cause kidney damage.

    3-Dietary fructose REALLY causes kidney damage.

    4-Many kidney issues have either a hyperinsulinemic characteristic, an autoimmune characteristic, and or a combination of autoimmunity or hyperinsulinism. A standard, low-ish carb paleo diet can fix most of these issues.

    5-For serious kidney damage a low-protein, ketogenic diet can be remarkably therapeutic.

    6-If you get kidney stones that are from oxalates, reduce your green veggie intake (spinach for example) and have other types of veggies.

    7-If you get kidney stones that are from urate salts, you are likely NOT following a low-ish carb paleo diet, you likely have insulin resistance and your liver is not processing uric acid."

    Clearing up Kidney Confusion: Part Deux

    hope this is useful - Robb Wolf's site is great for these questions.
    Last edited by upupandaway; 03-28-2013 at 08:20 AM.

  10. #20
    Drumroll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    I'm the opposite of eKatherine - higher protein seems to make me lose better, even given close to the same calories. Not sure why except everyone's different.
    It takes about one calorie to fully process a gram of protein in your body. I've heard some nutritionists say that as a result, we should really think of protein as being 3.5 calories a gram as opposed to 4.5 (total energy obtained - energy used to process = net energy obtained) but it might not be QUITE this simplistic.

    Still, it could explain your extra weightloss when eating more protein.

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