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Thread: Thyroid: why does it get more attention than Pituitary? page 3

  1. #21
    Derpamix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumroll View Post
    Derp, my question is, whether or not it's worth eliminating the distinct hormonal advantages of having a pituitary to live a few extra years?
    I don't think there are any advantages of having normal or higher levels of pituitary, and have only seen positive effects of having it lowered or even suppressed(minimized prolactin, growth hormone)

    To the rest, specifically marcadav:

    A few people who had extremely low levels of pituitary hormones, and were told that they must take several hormone supplements for the rest of their life, began producing normal amounts of those hormones within a few days of eating more protein and fruit. Their endocrinologist described them as, effectively, having no pituitary gland. Extreme malnutrition in Africa has been described as creating “. . . a condition resembling hypophysectomy,” (Ingenbleek and Beckers, 1975) but the people I talked to in Oregon were just following what they thought were healthful nutritional policies, avoiding eggs and sugars, and eating soy products.

    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles...yroidism.shtml
    Time is passing so quickly. Right now, I feel like complaining to Einstein. Whether time is slow or fast depends on perception. Relativity theory is so romantic. And so sad.

  2. #22
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    Is lower thyroid activity linked to longevity?

    Might as well remove the entire endocrine system, could live forever!

    Just a conditional argument based on context....

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by iconoclast79 View Post
    Is lower thyroid activity linked to longevity?

    Might as well remove the entire endocrine system, could live forever!

    Just a conditional argument based on context....
    "The researchers suggest that the lower activity of thyroid hormones could shift the body's energy expenditure away from growth and proliferation in favor of protective maintenance, keeping the body healthier longer. However, other factors could be associated with both thyroid function and longevity, removing credit from the thyroid."

    lel

    Your googlefu is weak man, this is just nonsense.
    Time is passing so quickly. Right now, I feel like complaining to Einstein. Whether time is slow or fast depends on perception. Relativity theory is so romantic. And so sad.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    "The researchers suggest that the lower activity of thyroid hormones could shift the body's energy expenditure away from growth and proliferation in favor of protective maintenance, keeping the body healthier longer. However, other factors could be associated with both thyroid function and longevity, removing credit from the thyroid."

    lel



    Your googlefu is weak man, this is just nonsense.
    Not as credible as a 1983 study on collagen in rat tails? Although, I'm not allowed to mention that, as you poisoned the well on criticism of that study.

    Speaking of nonsense: '...in fact removing it seems to extend life and delay the aging process. Stress promotes overexertion of the pituitary gland.'
    Last edited by iconoclast79; 03-23-2013 at 07:37 PM.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by iconoclast79 View Post
    Not as credible as a 1983 study on collagen in rat tails? Although, I'm not allowed to mention that, as you poisoned the well on criticism of that study.

    Speaking of nonsense: '...in fact removing it seems to extend life and delay the aging process. Stress promotes overexertion of the pituitary gland.'
    Yes, I guess you can take pride in the fact your link has less credibility than a study done on rat tails. Now, if you may, refute the rest of my posts without resorting to meaningless straw man arguments.
    Time is passing so quickly. Right now, I feel like complaining to Einstein. Whether time is slow or fast depends on perception. Relativity theory is so romantic. And so sad.

  6. #26
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  7. #27
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    So, stress is hard on the pituitary, which is bad.

    If that's what your saying, I agree. That means the pituitary functioning well is very important, right?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by iconoclast79 View Post
    So, stress is hard on the pituitary, which is bad.

    If that's what your saying, I agree. That means the pituitary functioning well is very important, right?
    It is hard on your pituitary, because stress causes over exertion of the pituitary and lowered thyroid function. With a healthy thyroid, your pituitary properly takes a backseat and doesn't have much to do with anything. Over stimulation of pituitary hormones causes problems.
    Time is passing so quickly. Right now, I feel like complaining to Einstein. Whether time is slow or fast depends on perception. Relativity theory is so romantic. And so sad.

  9. #29
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    I don't know, all the thyroid in the world won't fix someone with stress induced adrenal fatigue.

    Hormone systems are complex, it's futile to compartmentalize.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    I don't think there are any advantages of having normal or higher levels of pituitary, and have only seen positive effects of having it lowered or even suppressed(minimized prolactin, growth hormone)

    To the rest, specifically marcadav:

    A few people who had extremely low levels of pituitary hormones, and were told that they must take several hormone supplements for the rest of their life, began producing normal amounts of those hormones within a few days of eating more protein and fruit. Their endocrinologist described them as, effectively, having no pituitary gland. Extreme malnutrition in Africa has been described as creating “. . . a condition resembling hypophysectomy,” (Ingenbleek and Beckers, 1975) but the people I talked to in Oregon were just following what they thought were healthful nutritional policies, avoiding eggs and sugars, and eating soy products.

    Preventing and treating cancer with progesterone.
    Your point?
    Even Ingenbleek and Beckers were careful when speaking about extreme malnutrition and pituitary hormonal levels. There's a difference between resembling hypophysectomy and actually not having a pituitary.

    I also noted the number of people who saw a return to normal hormonal production after eating protein and fruit-- a few.

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