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Thread: Pregnancy Foods To Ease Nausea page 2

  1. #11
    cillakat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehstrauss View Post
    Since then she has taken it for all her pregnancies starting around week 8 when the nausea starts, and says it makes it possible for her to keep food down.
    Starting sufficient B6 at the very beginnin, before the nausea starts tends to be even more effective. And when used in combination with eating protein/produce every 90 minutes - again from the beginning - before nausea starts - it often, though not always, heads it off completely.

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  2. #12
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    @Cillakat-Thanks for clarifying the B6 v. B12 point and coming through with the name and additional info on Unisom! I hope your expertise isn't from personal experience with severe morning sickness! When chatting with my friend, I was just so grateful that my morning sickness was only normal-horrible, and lasted only a month. :/

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    Yeah... I would rather have "permission" to eat foods that keep me from puking up all my nutrition and starving my developing baby... PG is time to relax a little... Not with a 6 pack or anything... but not to be so hard core that you're preventing your body from being well...

    Discuss all supplements with an OB/GYN... I would imagine that blood work is important to monitor if supplementing with extra anything... (mostly concerned about toxic levels... and I have NO IDEA what they might/might not be!)

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    GINGER! I've had a lot of issues with nausea in my life due to health problems and medications (I had tonsillitis one week out of every four last year. the infections made me dizzy, antibiotics made me nauseous. got the suckers out at christmas, haven't been ill AT ALL since). I've found ginger to be the second best thing to treat it. candied ginger slices or ginger tea worked best for me. only thing more effective is bonine, an otc anti-motion-sickness medication that doesn't make you drowsy like Dramamine (of course, PLEASE check with your OB before taking anything while pregnant).

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    Quote Originally Posted by ehstrauss View Post
    @Cillakat-Thanks for clarifying the B6 v. B12 point and coming through with the name and additional info on Unisom! I hope your expertise isn't from personal experience
    Personal and professional experience but not with morning sickness. Mine was minimal to the point of inconsequential. My background is midwifery though I bailed on my training when my first was born. I've been involved in midwifery, pregnancy, birth, labor support, lactation in one way or another since 1993.

    Quote Originally Posted by twinmama View Post
    Discuss all supplements with an OB/GYN... I would imagine that blood work is important to monitor if supplementing with extra anything... (mostly concerned about toxic levels... and I have NO IDEA what they might/might not be!)
    You make a good point twinmama. I guess though, that it's important to note that doctors have virtually no medical school or residency education in nutrition, health or supplements. The training truly is focused on biochemical processes, body systems and disease. My dear brother is an anesthesiologist - he also happens to be very primal and runs into daily frustrations both with patients and medical professionals due to the complete ignorance on both sides regarding health and nutrition. There is a complete disconnect just as there is with the ADA and what constitues a healthy diet.

    In an evolutionary environment, eating meat, bone broths, organ meats all from wild animals, our b vitamin intake, accross the board, would be much much higher than the point at which the RDI is currently set. The RDI doesn't take into account what we need nutrionally, but is nothing more than a reflection, beginning in the 1950's of what a typical diet supplied at that time.

    Certainly alert one's hcp (mw, doc, ob) to the fact that b6 is being taken (and print out the above cite I posted) but at a level of 25 mg 2x per day, there is no concern of toxicity. B6 toxicity can occur at greater than 500 mg per day, taken over time.

    Merck:
    "Usually, pyridoxine 50 to 100 mg po once/day corrects the deficiency in adults. ....For deficiency due to increased metabolic demand, amounts larger than the daily recommended intake (DRI) may be required. For most cases of inborn errors of metabolism, high doses of pyridoxine may be effective."

    Because B6 is so effective in treating nausea in some women, we can assume that they were either deficient to begin with, or that 'due to increased metabolic deman" [due to pregnancy] their needs are increased.

    Quote Originally Posted by moonablaze View Post
    week out of every four last year. the infections made me dizzy, antibiotics made me nauseous. got the suckers out at christmas, haven't been ill AT ALL since).
    Ginger is also an effective evidence based tx for nausea - though my personal preference is generally to first use a substance that occurs naturally in the body (b6) to correct a deficiency than to use a medicinal food or medicinal herb. While functional foods do work by correcting deficiencies, medicinal foods or herbs may be treating the symptom via another pathway, allowing the deficiency to live on - now undetected, while simply ameliorating the symptom.

    One randomized controlled ginger trial is exerpted below:
    "Likert scales showed that 28 of 32 in the ginger group had improvement in nausea symptoms compared with 10 of 35 in the placebo group (P < .001). No adverse effect of ginger on pregnancy outcome was detected."

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    Last edited by twinmama; 05-06-2010 at 03:23 PM. Reason: 'cause I'm sure you don't want to read what I wrote 2x's

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    [QUOTE=twinmama;110401]
    Quote Originally Posted by cillakat View Post

    You make a good point twinmama. I guess though, that it's important to note that doctors have virtually no medical school or residency education in nutrition, health or supplements. The training truly is focused on biochemical processes, body systems and disease. My dear brother is an anesthesiologist - he also happens to be very primal and runs into daily frustrations both with patients and medical professionals due to the complete ignorance on both sides regarding health and nutrition. There is a complete disconnect just as there is with the ADA and what constitues a healthy diet.

    In an evolutionary environment, eating meat, bone broths, organ meats all from wild animals, our b vitamin intake, accross the board, would be much much higher than the point at which the RDI is currently set. The RDI doesn't take into account what we need nutrionally, but is nothing more than a reflection, beginning in the 1950's of what a typical diet supplied at that time.

    Certainly alert one's hcp (mw, doc, ob) to the fact that b6 is being taken (and print out the above cite I posted) but at a level of 25 mg 2x per day, there is no concern of toxicity. B6 toxicity can occur at greater than 500 mg per day, taken over time.

    Merck:
    "Usually, pyridoxine 50 to 100 mg po once/day corrects the deficiency in adults. ....For deficiency due to increased metabolic demand, amounts larger than the daily recommended intake (DRI) may be required. For most cases of inborn errors of metabolism, high doses of pyridoxine may be effective."

    Because B6 is so effective in treating nausea in some women, we can assume that they were either deficient to begin with, or that 'due to increased metabolic deman" [due to pregnancy] their needs are increased.


    As I said... I did not know at what level one could become toxic. I personally would not in a million years take the advise of ANYONE on the internet quotes from Merck or not (Merck was fine with fosomax... their baby from the early '90's, and look at just how wrong that was)... when it comes to my babies that I'm growing. Research the suggestions, and talk with MY trusted Dr. and Pharmacist, witch doctor or whatever... I understand that you are right however, that an increase in this supplement is known to be fairly safe... But you can't assume that a person won't jump into the more is better boat when they are puking their brains out if they don't know otherwise... Also agreed that many doctors barely know their bum from a hole in the wall when it comes to nutrition.... There are certain precautions I'm personally willing to side on because a growing baby is more delicate than an adult human body.


    I take the medical profession with a grain of salt... we need them... But they aren't gods... just humans trained in a certain fashion... for what it's worth the last anesthesiologist, damn near "put me to sleep"... as in the BIG SLEEP! Someone always graduated at the bottom of the class!

    Edited 'cause I clearly graduated LAST in spelling!

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    Anything she's craving, she has permission to eat. Remember, she's not really in charge at this point.

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