Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 65

Thread: Incorporating Primal into Yoga? Or just general personalisation. page

  1. #1
    YogaBare's Avatar
    YogaBare is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    . . .
    Posts
    4,547

    Incorporating Primal into Yoga? Or just general personalisation.

    Primal Fuel
    I've been teaching yoga for just over one year. It's a slow, strong form of yoga: very focused on isometric stretching, meditation, and holding strong poses for a very long time. I love it, but I'm bored of teaching it! I want to incorporate some of the things I've learned from Primal into my class, but I'm not sure how.

    My own practice has developed quite a lot. I've incorporated in more movement and repetitions, and try to make it a little more explosive.

    Just wondering if other yogi and yoginis have been influenced by Primal, and if so how? If you're a teacher, how do you mix primal and yoga to share with your students? If you are a student, do you go to any teachers who bring something special and unique to their way of teaching?
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  2. #2
    heatseeker's Avatar
    heatseeker is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    593
    I teach Moksha, and I don't deviate from the series much when I'm teaching specifically a Moksha class; students tend to hate it when you go too off-book, and I'm the same way when I'm a student, I hate when you seek out a specific style and then the teacher instructs a totally different class. But I too wanted to bridge Primal and yoga within my teaching, so I ended up creating an entirely separate class I call "athlete mobility" (creative naming is not my strong suit) that incorporates a lot of Primal movements and prepares the joints and muscles for Primal-style workouts. It's mostly Crossfitters and runners that come to the class. I do long holds on the big muscles--lots of Powerful, Awkward, Prayer Twist, Runner's Lunge, etc--and do lots of hip, chest, and shoulder openers, and in between the longer holds I throw in flows designed to mimic Primal movements. So, like, one flow I do is Grok Squat (I like that name better than any of the various yoga names for that pose!) to Crow, jump back to Chaturanga, Up Dog, Down Dog, jump up to Grok Squat. I'll also toss in some light plyometrics designed to increase range of motion and prime the brain for explosive movement.

    I don't make it a very strenuous or difficult class--something that always irks me, as someone with a VERY strenuous physical practice outside of yoga, is that it's hard to find yoga classes that focus more on mobility and proprioception than on "come get a kickass workout!". I already get my ass kicked daily, I don't want yoga to be another workout on top of that, thanks. And athletes are usually hesitant to try yoga for exactly that reason, they (rightly) feel like their muscles won't recover if they throw in more workouts. Personally I don't consider yoga to be exercise (I'm not saying it's not, I'm just saying I don't see it that way). I consider it to be a mobility practice for the body and mind.

    Honestly, I think the biggest Primal/yoga crossover I practice is that I'm completely open with my students about eating meat and my personal thoughts on ahimsa as it relates to nutrition. Those who teach yoga know what a huge deal that is, all by itself.

  3. #3
    Badkty22's Avatar
    Badkty22 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    177
    "...it's hard to find yoga classes that focus more on mobility and proprioception than on "come get a kickass workout!".

    This, exactly. I recently decided to take up yoga again, joined a studio by my house, and the teachers are all over the place. I've done a beginners class where we moved very slow and did nothing remotely stressful, and another beginners class where I was sweating and out of breath ten minutes in. The most enjoyable class I've had there was one where we did more what heatseeker is describing, really getting into and holding those big stretches for a length of time. I feel that is what I really need, to counteract all the contraction of muscles that occur in my other workouts. But my friend, who is trying to use yoga more as a weight loss technique, didn't enjoy that one at all.

    As far as primal yoga, I will say that the one thing that stuck with me from the classes I took years ago was my teacher being adamant that even if we don't continue to practice, we still find time to squat low as often as possible. Not sure why that stuck, but I was a dutiful student and squatted whenever I could outside of practice. Really came in handy when I joined crossfit. Couldn't lift worth a damn but I could squat low with the best of them!

  4. #4
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,309
    I used to be into stretching when I was in high school. About 18 years ago I started getting back into it, bought some yoga books and made what I considered to be excellent progress. So I joined an Iyengar yoga class at a gym near where I worked.

    The teacher was very strict on protecting my knees by keeping them bolt-straight, even though this was an unnatural position for someone whose knee joints straighten to >180. When I changed studios and joined one closer to home, that teacher was as insistent.

    But what happened was that by keeping my knees apparently perfectly straight rather than allowing them to enter a stable position, I was putting all the stress on my hips, which I already knew were my weak joints. I finally had an in-class collapse and ended up quitting yoga entirely. After that I had a tendency to reinjure my hips, and was unable to do any real stretching again until a few months ago.

    So now I do my stretching without yoga.

  5. #5
    Hedonist2's Avatar
    Hedonist2 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,194
    Mark has done some posts on yoga. And I believe his wife is very into it.
    Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

  6. #6
    heatseeker's Avatar
    heatseeker is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    593
    eKatherine, it's too bad your experience with yoga was poor (I wouldn't have put you in an Iyengar class right off the bat), but if you think yoga is "stretching" then man, you really had some bad instructors. Stretching is one tiny ice crystal in the giant iceberg that is a yoga practice. It's like saying you wanted to get better at tying your shoes, so you joined a soccer team.

  7. #7
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,309
    I was into stretching. I thought yoga would help that, and I wanted to get better at yoga, too.

  8. #8
    YogaBare's Avatar
    YogaBare is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    . . .
    Posts
    4,547
    Quote Originally Posted by heatseeker View Post
    I teach Moksha, and I don't deviate from the series much when I'm teaching specifically a Moksha class; students tend to hate it when you go too off-book, and I'm the same way when I'm a student, I hate when you seek out a specific style and then the teacher instructs a totally different class. But I too wanted to bridge Primal and yoga within my teaching, so I ended up creating an entirely separate class I call "athlete mobility" (creative naming is not my strong suit) that incorporates a lot of Primal movements and prepares the joints and muscles for Primal-style workouts. It's mostly Crossfitters and runners that come to the class. I do long holds on the big muscles--lots of Powerful, Awkward, Prayer Twist, Runner's Lunge, etc--and do lots of hip, chest, and shoulder openers, and in between the longer holds I throw in flows designed to mimic Primal movements. So, like, one flow I do is Grok Squat (I like that name better than any of the various yoga names for that pose!) to Crow, jump back to Chaturanga, Up Dog, Down Dog, jump up to Grok Squat. I'll also toss in some light plyometrics designed to increase range of motion and prime the brain for explosive movement.

    I don't make it a very strenuous or difficult class--something that always irks me, as someone with a VERY strenuous physical practice outside of yoga, is that it's hard to find yoga classes that focus more on mobility and proprioception than on "come get a kickass workout!". I already get my ass kicked daily, I don't want yoga to be another workout on top of that, thanks. And athletes are usually hesitant to try yoga for exactly that reason, they (rightly) feel like their muscles won't recover if they throw in more workouts. Personally I don't consider yoga to be exercise (I'm not saying it's not, I'm just saying I don't see it that way). I consider it to be a mobility practice for the body and mind.

    Honestly, I think the biggest Primal/yoga crossover I practice is that I'm completely open with my students about eating meat and my personal thoughts on ahimsa as it relates to nutrition. Those who teach yoga know what a huge deal that is, all by itself.
    Hey Heatseeker, Thanks for the long reply

    I teach Tantra Yoga (nothing to do with sex ) which is a pretty rare form of Yoga, so people who come to my class don't know what to expect. As I said, it's a slow, strong style, but I think it would benefit from a little more dynamism. Some people go to Yoga for as a fitness thing, others go as a relaxation thing. I mostly get the relaxation students, but I do like the idea of giving them a little bit of a workout first, as it makes it easier to relax after. Like you say, it's mobility of the body and mind.

    The class you've created sounds great! Honestly though, I'm in over my head with all the names and workout terminology... What do you define as a "Primal-style workout" and "Primal movements"?

    Great tip on the plyometrics - I already incorporate isometric stretching into my class (to improve flexibility, but also as a means of developing the body-mind connection) so this would compliment it well!

    What I know of Moksha yoga is similar to Tantra. It's all about living your true essence, being yourself? The Tantric path is "Celebrate your life, everything is cool". So eating meat isn't a prob according to Tantric philosophy - students find that really interesting. Actually, Tantra and Primal have a lot in common, which is probably why I'm still posting on this website one year after joining! I'm not usually one to stick with online forums. Anyway, I digress
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  9. #9
    YogaBare's Avatar
    YogaBare is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    . . .
    Posts
    4,547
    Quote Originally Posted by Badkty22 View Post
    As far as primal yoga, I will say that the one thing that stuck with me from the classes I took years ago was my teacher being adamant that even if we don't continue to practice, we still find time to squat low as often as possible. Not sure why that stuck, but I was a dutiful student and squatted whenever I could outside of practice. Really came in handy when I joined crossfit. Couldn't lift worth a damn but I could squat low with the best of them!
    I think the best tip I give my students is that if you want to develop a regular practice, start by doing three minutes a day! Three mins is pretty achievable, and if you can do that with no guilt you'll be amazed at how quickly you build up to longer sessions. People find the whole prospect of "getting on the mat" very daunting at first, so three mins breaks them out of that conditioned mode of thinking.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

  10. #10
    YogaBare's Avatar
    YogaBare is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    . . .
    Posts
    4,547
    Quote Originally Posted by eKatherine View Post
    I was into stretching. I thought yoga would help that, and I wanted to get better at yoga, too.
    Just a hunch, but maybe you injured yourself cos' you were pushing too hard?
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •