Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: A win for American kids? page

  1. #1
    teach2183's Avatar
    teach2183 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Chicago Suburbs
    Posts
    1,057

    A win for American kids?

    Skim milk may not lower child obesity risk - CNN.com

    Perhaps a win for American kids if this leads to a push away from skim milk for preschoolers?

  2. #2
    paul119's Avatar
    paul119 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Izmir, Turkey
    Posts
    103
    Better skim milk than soda pop and fruit juices.

    With all the anti-fat hysteria, I can't see this making much of a difference in the near future, but possibly down the road..
    Travel, eat well, and learn about life - three things I love to do

    Curious about what YOU should pack next time you're on the road? Check out my Definitive Guide to Backpacking Nutrition

  3. #3
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,425
    Considering that the authors are fishing for excuses not to make changes in recommendations, they can't accept their own results. The authors are pro plant-based diet and seem to be saying that saturated fat is bad.

  4. #4
    myzenmoments's Avatar
    myzenmoments is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2
    This scares me it is a total move to poison our kids. I don't allow my children to eat school lunches and especially milks, but that is not an option for everyone and a lot of people will just buy what ever is available at the grocery store they may not have time or energy to stay up to date with what's going on with their food (although I strongly believe everyone should). Tat is why they are trying to sneak this in under peoples noses. Aspartame in milk... honestly and also without labeling it... this article makes me so upset...! We need to fight this kind of stuff.

    FDA to Allow Unlabeled Use of Aspartame in Dairy Products

  5. #5
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,425
    Quote Originally Posted by myzenmoments View Post
    This scares me it is a total move to poison our kids. I don't allow my children to eat school lunches and especially milks, but that is not an option for everyone and a lot of people will just buy what ever is available at the grocery store they may not have time or energy to stay up to date with what's going on with their food (although I strongly believe everyone should). Tat is why they are trying to sneak this in under peoples noses. Aspartame in milk... honestly and also without labeling it... this article makes me so upset...! We need to fight this kind of stuff.
    Clearly you are upset, to hijack an unrelated thread to spam this link.

  6. #6
    Kris C's Avatar
    Kris C is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Charleston, SC but my head is in Kauai
    Posts
    195
    I read an article about it on NPR's site. I thought there was hope when it mentioned the theory of fat leading to satiety.

    From the NPR article:
    "...In a 2005 study, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital reported that skim and 1 percent milk were associated with weight gain among 9-to-14-year-olds.

    And a 2010 study by researchers at Children's Hospital in Boston, which also looked at preschool-aged children, found that higher intake of whole milk at age 2 was associated with a slightly lower BMI (body mass index). The researchers concluded that switching from whole milk to reduced-fat milk at 2 years did not appear to prevent weight problems in early childhood.

    When you look at these studies together, DeBoer's findings become more intriguing, though it's unclear how higher fat could lead to lower weight.

    One theory: It's possible that whole milk gives us a greater sense of satiety.

    "This is speculative," says DeBoer, but if you feel fuller after drinking whole-fat milk, "it may be protective if the other food options are high in calories." In other words, if whole-fat milk saves a kid from eating an extra cookie or a second serving of mashed potatoes, he or she may end up eating fewer calories overall..."

    I won't hold my breath to see the AAP change the recommendation for children's milk choices. I do, hoever, share concern with myzenmoments about putting aspartame into milk without labeling it as such, but that's a whole 'nother discussion.
    Starting weight: 168 lbs
    Current weight: 168 lbs
    Goal weight: whatever makes me look strong and healthy!

    Current goal: No More Muffin Top!!
    a real pushup, a real pull-up, weekly sprints

    Visit my journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread76206.htmlKris' Place for Primal Rantings...because everyone else thinks she's nuts

  7. #7
    Polecatz's Avatar
    Polecatz is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    164
    I think its appalling that low fat dairy products are being pushed at TWO YEAR OLDS! How fricking deluded are these experts! Kids are getting fat because they are drinking full fat milk - yeah right.

    I was born in the 70s and we got free milk at school and it was full fat milk. I actually didn't like it but you had to drink it no arguments and that was it. NO-ONE was anywhere near obese back then at school - we were all skinny little rats so I don't know how full fat milk ended up being demonised.

    I don't think they are pushing low fat products at kids that young in the UK yet - I hope not. All my friends'/family kids drink full fat milk and their parents are adamant about it being better for kids. I mean kids of 8 or nine all of whom are slim.

  8. #8
    s-piper's Avatar
    s-piper is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    202
    Yeah, the idea that kids are getting fat because they drink whole milk is rediculous because my experience as a child says that kids aren't drinking whole milk.
    When I was in elementary school (in the 90s) the whole milk was the least popular item. I remember we'd all file into the lunch room and the first stop was the milk cooler where you'd grab your milk. 99% of kids would get fat-free chocolate milk. Your occasional odd ball kid would get plain 2% or fat-free strawberry milk (Gross!). Teachers who wanted milk might get plain skim, but not all teachers drank milk with lunch. The whole milk would remain entirely untouched. This was true in every class I was in from kindergarten through 5th grade, so I'm sure it was true for every class not just mine. I shudder to think how much whole milk the lunch ladies threw out because it went bad.
    Last edited by s-piper; 03-22-2013 at 06:11 PM.

  9. #9
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,425
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    You occasionally read an article about some middle class parents who are starving their little kids by feeding them limited calories and no fat, resulting in stunted growth. It's pathetic the message that misguided people are getting out of the propaganda.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •