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Thread: Is it better to overeat or undereat? page 2

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbag View Post
    Mix it up! Undereat in the daytime and overeat at night and undereat on some of the week days and overeat in the weekends etc. I am a firm believer that we need both, and that we do good by cycle between periods of undereating/fasting and overeating/feasting...
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    I totally agree with the statement from Gorbag. I think you need both to be healthy. I'll have days where I am STARVING and am a bottomless pit and will eat ANYTHING put in front of me. Then I'll have days where I don't eat at all. (Shrug) The body does what the body wants.
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    Thanks for all the replies!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbag View Post
    Mix it up! Undereat in the daytime and overeat at night and undereat on some of the week days and overeat in the weekends etc. I am a firm believer that we need both, and that we do good by cycle between periods of undereating/fasting and overeating/feasting...
    Brilliant. I actually think this is how the human body thrives... variety! Works for exercise too.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    With regards to calories and nutrients slightly over is better in my opinion, but if you have GI issues then one needs to be more wary with volume and composition regarding the physical demands placed on the GI tract.

    Once your body is and has been for a while in reasonable health, then IF and occassional calorie restriction is good to force your body to scavange out all the crap hidden in those hard to reach places and to increase cycling rate of adipose tissue stores.
    That's a good point about GI issues. Funnily enough, when I overeat on crap, or particular foods (like nuts), it gives me problems, but when I overeat on real food... niente!

    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    Am interested in the night sweats, I had these all my life and thaught it was normal for me, but when I went Primal they pretty much stopped altogether, through a number of dietary indiscretions over time, I am pretty sure for me it was most likely high carb intake along with Gluten and possibly other grain related factors.

    I suspect the effect may be related to hormonal disruption, there are two key hormonal responses going into sleep mode, firstly Melatonin starts to ramp up from around 9 pm, this starts to send the I'm sleepy signal and then peaks at around 4am. The thyroid system also activates in the same cycle basically with TSH and T3 also peaking around the same time. In a healthy individual this is the most appropriate timing as these thyroid levels would normally send one completely Hyper, but melatonin is much more powerful and overides the T3 and keeps you asleep by moderating the metabolic response. This may also feed into the overnight body maintenance & repair process, and the elevated T3 may be a key part to this function.

    If there is a mistiming in the Melationin and T3 levels then there is a possibility that if your T3 was a bit low in the past things would be ok, but now if your T3 has increased, but the timing with melatonin is not quite right and the T3 peak earlier, then this may result in the sweats and an accelerated metabolism, might be worth checking body temp and heart rate when you wake up with the sweats.

    Not sure if the above is completely relevant, but worth some consideration.
    Thanks for all the info Omni! I've had chronic insomnia for nine years, most nights waking up around 3.30 / 4am, so something is definitely off. But at the moment I'm sleeping better than I have in a long, long time, night sweats and all! I'm getting my bloods done next wk so should have more to work with there re. t3 etc.

    I'm thinking the night sweats might just be from eating a lot of food and my body burning it off thermogenically? Cos' in the past I've gotten them it after overeating - even on macademia nuts.
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    Quote Originally Posted by jammies View Post
    Reduced calorie diets have been shown to promote longevity in worms and perhaps in mice.
    Lol
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    Eat to support metabolism.
    Got that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Derpamix View Post
    People believe undereating has an affect on longevity due to phagocytosis, which is in tune after a certain number of hours of fasting.

    Peat's view:

    "Unsaturated fatty acids inhibit phagocytosis. Dietary restriction activates phagocytosis, suggesting that normal diets contain suppressive materials. Subnormal temperatures cause a shift from phagocytosis to inflammation."

    "The great decline in proteolytic autophagy that occurs with aging can be reduced by inhibiting the release of fatty acids. This effect is additive to the antiaging effects of calorie restriction, suggesting that it is largely the decrease of dietary fats that makes calorie restriction effective."

    He also theorizes that co2 production causes macrophages to activate phagocytic neutrophils, which increases their number.
    Going to have to read the rest of that a few more times...!
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    Quote Originally Posted by murf73 View Post
    I totally agree with the statement from Gorbag. I think you need both to be healthy. I'll have days where I am STARVING and am a bottomless pit and will eat ANYTHING put in front of me. Then I'll have days where I don't eat at all. (Shrug) The body does what the body wants.
    Female
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    130lbs
    Same!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gorbag View Post
    Mix it up! Undereat in the daytime and overeat at night and undereat on some of the week days and overeat in the weekends etc. I am a firm believer that we need both, and that we do good by cycle between periods of undereating/fasting and overeating/feasting...
    +3
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  8. #18
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    Mix it up is good and probably more 'natural.' But the oldest man to ever complete a marathon undereats in regard to calories.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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  9. #19
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    Mix it up as Gorbag says. If you have any kind of intense workout days make sure you get enough protein afterwards -- but otherwise fluctuate day to day.

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