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Thread: Questions about sardines and kelp noodles page 2

  1. #11
    Paleobird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artbuc View Post
    PB, have you eaten Wild Planet sardines? If yes, how do they compare to Crown Prince? CP are so much less expensive than WP but I am reluctant to switch because WP have been so consistently good. Thanks.
    Never tried the WP brand, sorry.

    Quote Originally Posted by johnmjoy View Post
    We've been buying olive oil packed Season brand sardines at the Costco.

    Last time I bought kelp noodles they were Gold Mine brand, at Amazon. Will have to try Sea Tangle (and I'm overdue to order some, so...)
    I buy mine at a website called Netrition.com. They also have a good selection of things like coconut products, natural gelatin, etc.

  2. #12
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    I have a (perhaps irrational) fear of soybean-adulterated olive oil, so I buy the sardines in tomato or marinara sauce or the ones in water. I usually eat the water ones with some Tabasco. I get Wild Planet when it's on sale or Season brand which I find to be almost as high quality.

  3. #13
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    Tip for kelp noodles - if you want them to be soft and pliable like regular noodles add an acid. Don't know what's in pho but if it has any tomato or vinegar that should be fine. If not, I've seen a recommendation to soak them in a water and lemon juice mixture. I do recommend not over-doing the lemon juice though because they tend to absorb flavors.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by s-piper View Post
    Tip for kelp noodles - if you want them to be soft and pliable like regular noodles add an acid. Don't know what's in pho but if it has any tomato or vinegar that should be fine. If not, I've seen a recommendation to soak them in a water and lemon juice mixture. I do recommend not over-doing the lemon juice though because they tend to absorb flavors.
    If you are going to eat them uncooked, very true. For a seaweed salad I use a mix of sesame oil, coconut vinegar and coconut aminos (which tastes like soy sauce). You can let it sit for days in the fridge. The flavors just get better.

    If you are going to boil them I suggest boiling them in something that is going to become part of the dish. E.g. if I'm making seafood over the noodles I boil them in canned clam broth. If it's something meatier I boil them in some bone broth. They don't need any acidity added if they are being boiled.

    They are very good at soaking up the flavors around them.
    Last edited by Paleobird; 03-22-2013 at 10:04 AM.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    If you are going to eat them uncooked, very true. For a seaweed salad I use a mix of sesame oil, coconut vinegar and coconut aminos (which tastes like soy sauce). You can let it sit for days in the fridge. The flavors just get better.

    If you are going to boil them I suggest boiling them in something that is going to become part of the dish. E.g. if I'm making seafood over the noodles I boil them in canned clam broth. If it's something meatier I boil them in some bone broth. They don't need any acidity added if they are being boiled.

    They are very good at soaking up the flavors around them.
    Really? First time I used them I boiled them for a good 20 minutes and they didn't get any softer. It was just in plain water.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by s-piper View Post
    Really? First time I used them I boiled them for a good 20 minutes and they didn't get any softer. It was just in plain water.
    I usually boil them until the stock I'm cooking them in boils down and thickens up to be a sauce, sometimes a good 45 minutes.

    There may also be differences in brands. Perhaps different types of kelp involved.

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