Page 9 of 19 FirstFirst ... 7891011 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 189

Thread: Almost-Primal Orthodox Christian Lenten Eating and Cooking page 9

  1. #81
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    Primal Fuel
    Here's an interesting recipe for SHRIMP AVOCADO SALAD:
    http://www.organicthrifty.com/2009/0...avocado-salad/
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  2. #82
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    Warning: Here is another non-primal post!

    Sometimes we are asked to cook tofu either for a vegan friend who is visiting or during Lent for a family member or church friend. Rather than getting all self-righteous about how tofu is bad for you, here is a recipe for --

    THE LEAST HARMFUL BREAKFAST TOFU SKILLET


    You will need sprouted tofu (I use Wildwood® SprouTofu® Extra Firm Water Pack | Wildwood), toasted sesame oil, a good brand of soy sauce (I like gluten free Tamari) and veggies – I use bell peppers, onions, and mushrooms. You could add others like fresh spinach and cooked small red potatoes, etc....

    Ingredients:
    Extra firm or firm sprouted tofu (about 3 to 4 ounces per person)
    Toasted sesame oil for frying (or part coconut oil or other oil)
    Green and/or red bell pepper, chopped ( about 2 tablespoons per person)
    Onion, chopped (about 2 tablespoons per person)
    (Other veggies? Spinach, sliced celery, sliced or grated carrot, etc….)
    Mushrooms, sliced (about 2 or 3 mushrooms per person)
    Some sliced cooked small red potatoes (optional)

    Directions:

    (Note: You can use part other oil for frying, but you need at least a little toasted sesame oil for the flavor.)

    Cut the tofu into cubes. Set aside. Cut up the veggies --you can use more, or different, veggies if you like. Heat a frying pan – I use a non-stick one. Add about 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil (or more if you are making a big batch) to the frying pan and dump in the tofu. Sprinkle with some soy sauce. Stir-fry until as brown and cooked as you like. Empty the fried tofu into your serving bowl. Then add another tablespoon of sesame oil (or other oil) and stir-fry the potatoes (if using potatoes) sprinkle with a little soy sauce and dump into the serving bowl with the tofu. Then add more sesame oil (or other oil) if the pan looks dry, and stir-fry the onions and peppers until they are as done as you like. (If you are using spinach, add the spinach to the pan when the peppers and onions are almost done, cover pan and let wilt. Uncover and stir briefly. Spinach should be done enough.) Sprinkle veggies with a little soy sauce and dump into the serving bowl. Finally stir fry the mushrooms in the hot pan until done to your liking. Return everything to the pan and stir-fry briefly until everything is hot. Empty the skillet back into the serving dish or serve directly from the skillet.

    We don’t have tofu often -- this is the only way I serve it, and I only serve it during Lent. I fix it once in a while when DH asks for it. I figure once every couple of weeks or so won’t hurt us.

    Note: If you are using the potatoes, you can make up a breakfast skillet without the tofu, but with all the rest of the ingredients for people who would prefer NOT to eat the tofu.

    Last edited by Antiochia; 04-23-2013 at 07:17 PM.
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  3. #83
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    Another good shrimp dinner:

    SHRIMP PECAN

    1 cup chopped pecans
    2 tablespoons coconut oil
    16 oz. mushrooms, sliced
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    5 green onions, sliced (save the sliced tops for garnish)
    1 green pepper, diced
    1 red pepper, diced
    5 tablespoons soy sauce
    1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
    16 oz. cooked & deveined shrimp
    3 cups cooked cauliflower rice (see post #13)
    Additional coconut oil

    Sauté the pecans in coconut oil and set aside. Fry the mushrooms for 2-3 minutes, adding more coconut oil if necessary. Add the garlic, onion bottoms, and peppers; sauté lightly. Remove the veggies with a slotted spoon, leaving the liquid in the pan. Mix together the soy sauce and arrowroot and then pour into the pan and cook and stir until thickened. Add the veggies, cauliflower rice, and pecans and mix well. Cook and stir until hot. Add the shrimp, and cook just long enough to warm them – do not overcook. Sprinkle with the reserved sliced onion tops and serve.
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  4. #84
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    FAST AND CREAMY TOMATO SOUP

    Combine in a blender
    1 6-oz. can tomato paste
    4 cans water (measure with the tomato paste can)
    I/2 cup raw cashews
    1 teaspoon onion powder
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    Some freshly ground black pepper

    Blend on high speed for several minutes until cashews are completely ground up and the soup is smooth. Pour into a saucepan or the top of a double boiler and heat until hot.

    Edit 10/6/2013: Changed the amount of cashews from 2/3 cup to 1/2 cup.
    Last edited by Antiochia; 10-06-2013 at 04:23 PM.
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  5. #85
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    SHIRATAKI NOODLES aka MIRACLE NOODLES aka konjac noodles

    Here’s Mark’s take on Shirataki Noodles:
    "You know, I’ve never actually had the urge to try them myself, but I don’t see anything wrong with konjac noodles. They might (okay, probably will) give you gas as the glucomannan is broken down in your gut, but they might also provide some butyrate production. Give ‘em a shot and see what you think. If the gas is bearable or nonexistent, I see nothing wrong with eating shirataki noodles when pasta cravings strike, or even on a regular to semi-regular basis; just don’t let them displace more nutritious (macro- and micro-nutrient wise) foods."

    Read more: Dear Mark: Apple Cider Vinegar, DNA Damage, Lactaid, and Miracle Noodles | Mark's Daily Apple

    I do use Shirataki noodles occasionally – especially when I get a craving for spaghetti with red sauce! Here is how to prepare them. Be sure to go to an Asian store and get the real shirataki noodles, not the tofu-shirataki noodles becoming more widely available in grocery stores. The real shirataki noodles are made without soy and have zero calories. They provide fiber, help regulate blood sugar, and also help feed the beneficial bacteria in the gut. You may have to start with a small portion, though, to see if you can handle the additional fiber.

    Shirataki noodles come packed in liquid in a plastic bag in the refrigerated section of the produce department. Empty the bag into a sieve and rinse well under hot water. Have some boiling broth or stock ready in a pot on the stove; well flavored veggie broth is fine. Add the noodles and simmer for 5 – 10 minutes. Then top with whatever sauce suits your fancy. An 8 oz. bag will give you 2 servings on the small side. If your body can handle it, you can consider a whole bag one serving.
    Last edited by Antiochia; 07-11-2013 at 02:06 PM.
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  6. #86
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    Here is another favorite easy recipe. I like to mix this sauce with sautéed mushrooms and serve over Shirataki Noodles (see post #85), OR Spaghetti Squash, OR Black Bean Spaghetti (See post #74 and https://www.navanfoods.com/explore-a...bean-spaghetti )

    MARINARA SAUCE

    Ingredients
    1 12-oz. can of tomato paste
    3 cups water (2 12-oz. can-fulls)
    2 tablespoons minced dried onion*
    1/2 teaspoon dehydrated garlic*
    2 tablespoons dried parsley
    1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon dried basil
    1 teaspoon sea salt
    (Optional: 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, 1/2 teaspoon red pepper, 1 packet stevia)
    Directions
    Put tomato paste in a saucepan. Gradually stir in the water. Add all the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil and then let simmer for 15 minutes. Makes a little over 1 quart.
    *Variation: Or sauté a chopped small onion with a minced fresh garlic clove or two in a little oil, instead of using the dried onion and garlic. Then remove from heat, add the tomato paste and proceed with the rest of the recipe.

    This recipe was adapted from Quick, Cheap & Easy Seasoned Tomato Sauce Pasta and Pizza | Hillbilly Housewife

    I also freeze this sauce in pint-size wide mouth canning jars. Then, when I want to use a jar, I put the jar in lukewarm water until it has begun to thaw enough around the sides so I can dump it into a saucepan and finish thawing it, and heat it up to serving temperature.
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  7. #87
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    Now I will take a break from this thread. I'll be busy with grandchildren for the next few days. This Sunday is our Palm Sunday. Next week is our Holy Week, and I want to focus on the services and the events of the week. Sunday, May 5 is our Easter (Pascha) this year, and after that we get to feast and enjoy our meat, dairy, and eggs again! A blessed Pascha to those celebrating the feast! Christ is Risen!
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  8. #88
    namelesswonder's Avatar
    namelesswonder is online now Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    MA, USA
    Posts
    11,993
    Happy Good Friday!
    Journal on depression/anxiety
    Currently trying to figure out WTF to eat (for IBS-C).

  9. #89
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    Thanks for your good wishes and thinking of me at this holy time!

    We enthusiastically observe Lent, but just as enthusiastically celebrate the feast - after our midnight Liturgy we had a wonderful party - I got home at 5am this morning after thoroughly breaking the fast with meat, cheese, eggs, wine, pascha bread... ummm I can barely button my jeans today!

    Then it was back to church this afternoon for Agape Vespers, roast lamb, and a multitude of everyone's favorite foods. I'm stuffed!

    Now to get back to Primal eating and see if I can comfortably button my jeans again!




    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  10. #90
    Antiochia's Avatar
    Antiochia is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    301
    The forty days from Pascha (Orthodox Easter) to Ascension have passed and it is time for the Antiochian Orthodox to resume their Wednesday and Friday Fasts. Other jurisdictions (Russians, Greeks, Serbs, etc...) have already begun. If you aren't up to IF on these days, then it is time for Almost-Primal again. We have a friend staying with us who is recovering from a broken arm and, even though I had planned to do IF, as good hosts we are serving food. Normally our friend lives alone, but with a cast from her elbow to her palm, and further surgery planned, we are happy and relieved that she agreed to stay with us. It's amazing how much you can't do if you only have the use of one hand and arm. You can't wash dishes -- you can't tie your shoes -- cooking is a challenge.

    Anyway, I found this soup recipe online that looks interesting -- I haven't tried it yet -- I don't have those particular vegetables on hand, but I will one of these days. It is from: Straight Into Bed Cakefree and Dried: Spiced Parsnip & Coconut Soup

    Spiced Parsnip and Coconut Soup
    (serves 4-6)

    This soup is creamy and subtly aniseedy, with a light curry flavour, if you want a strong curry flavour, double amounts of all the spices except turmeric. You can heat it up by adding cayenne or sprinkling chilli flakes on as I do (I use Pul Biber). Some fresh coriander leavesn [cilantro] or toasted cumin, nigella and sesame seeds are also delicious sprinkled on top. Put a plate of lemon wedges on the table for those who like something a little more piquant.

    1 medium onion
    1 large carrot
    3 medium parsnips
    Half a medium celeriac
    1/2 can of coconut milk (200ml)

    1tsp fennel seeds
    1tsp coriander seeds
    1/2 tsp cumin seeds
    3 green cardamoms
    1 1/2tsp ground turmeric
    Walnut sized piece of peeled fresh ginger

    Heat a couple of tablespoons of oil in a large sauce pan, chop the onion and add it, turning the heat low, so the onions just soften slowly, but don't catch.

    Peel and chop the carrot and parsnips into chunks and add to the pan to sweat. Peel the celeriac half and chop half of this piece into dice, reserving the rest for later. Add the celeriac dice to the pan and increase the heat to medium, stirring every couple of minutes for about ten minutes.

    While the vegetables are sweating, grind the whole spices in a pestle and mortar with a pinch of salt. Chop the ginger finely. Add the ground spices, ginger and turmeric to the pan and fry for a couple of minutes stirring occasionally, to cook off any bitterness.

    Add the coconut to the pan with a litre of water and cook until the vegetables are really soft. Puree the soup until velvety smooth in a blender and return to the pan. If it is too watery, cook uncovered until you have the right consistency - too thick, just add water.

    Grate the reserved piece of celeriac and add to the pan, bring back up to a simmer and cook until the celeriac is soft but still has a little bite - about 10-15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve.
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

Page 9 of 19 FirstFirst ... 7891011 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •