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Thread: So. Fish oil brands. page 2

  1. #11
    paul119's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    If you're not eating fish, and you absolutely refuse to do so, then I recommend investing the money you'd otherwise spend on fish in some high quality fish oil/fermented cod liver oil. Green Pastures has some excellent selections, and although pricy, are well worth what you pay.

    As a side note, one of the authors of a blog I follow forced himself to eat sardines in order to "acquire" the taste. Now he has absolutely no issue with eating fish. You could try a similar procedure.
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  2. #12
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    I take Mark's Omega-3 Oil, it's nearly the only one made from wild northern wild fish - think of that, real fish, no plants. I'd tried many other brands before and all of them upset my digestion. It is expensive, for me it's very worth it.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
    I used to take fish oil supplements (GNC brand) last year, but I fell out of the habit. Now I'm trying to get back on because I really dislike (most) fish. I was going to go Nordic Naturals, but it's something like $40 US for a bottle of 60 @ 1k mg or there abouts. Goodness.

    Last night at the CVS, I spotted a $9 bottle for 60 @ 1.2k mg if I remember.

    Naturally, I'm skeptical. Googling about says yay for CVS brand, and nay for CVS brand.

    So I'm hoping some of you guys here would have insights as to which companies are on top at the moment. I'd like higher concentration (1k +) per capsule, but it's not an absolute requirement.

    Thanks!

    M.
    If you're not up for eating fish regularly, Green Pasture offers cod liver oil. Since it's not cheap, I settle for one of these from Now Foods:

    Ultra Omega-3 - 180 Softgels - NOW Foods

    DHA-500 - 180 Softgels - NOW Foods

    Both are very good and the choice depends on the ratio EPA/DHA you want to have.

  4. #14
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    Rancid fish oil is not good for you...
    So break open a capsule every now and then to check.

    I just broke open a can of Bela wild caught Portuguese sardines.
    Skin, bones, cayenne,virgin olive oil.... mmmm

    The Great Sardine Taste-off – best canned sardines

  5. #15
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    Ascenta, NutraSea, Balanced EPA & DHA Omega-3 Supplement, Lemon Flavor, 16.9 fl oz (500 ml) - iHerb.com

    Very clean. It must be stored in the fridge, zero smell or after taste. Very high in DHA/EPA 500mg of DHA and 750mg of EPA per teaspoon. Its so good you could make a salad dressing with it.

    If you use iherb coupon code ZUH430 for 10 bucks

    Amazon and other retailers have it as well.

  6. #16
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    Vitacost has their name brand items which are good quality at a reasonable price, with free shipping if you spend a modest amount and are buying their brand.

    That's where I've been getting mine--both fish oil and cod liver oil liquid (lemon flavor). I've gotten used to it and
    just take swallow out of the bottle every day or two. It is my personal bottle, of course. . .

    I get their coconut oil too--both through subscription to save cash.
    Last edited by missblue; 03-20-2013 at 06:53 PM.

  7. #17
    Vega's Avatar
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    I'm using orange flavored Coromega. They say it's purified to get rid of contaminants and it tastes good.

  8. #18
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    Fish oil is a drying oil, similar to flax/linseed and other highly polyunsaturated fats. That means they dry into a glasslike film at room temperature in the presence of air and light. This is because they are extremely unstable. Fish oil is the most unstable - more unstable than the ALA-based vegetarian omega-3 counterparts because it is a longer chain fat.

    I would never, ever, ever take fish oil. You are taking a highly refined drying oil (almost certainly from farmed fish) that has been transported likely hundreds of miles in the back of a hot truck, then sat under fluorescent lighting for weeks and months. If your fish oil isn't rancid when you buy it, it'll oxidize inside you.

    All research I've done on fish oil points that it is extremely unstable and extremely toxic when isolated from the fish due to its incredible instability. It is essentially a precursor to varnish or stain - they were traditionally made out of seed and fish oils because they turn into a shiny, glass-like surface upon application due to rapid oxidation. Now that the paint market is dominated by chemicals and not natural seed and fish-based oils, they simply shifted to the food market. They're selling their toxic seed and fish oils as health food, now. Soy, anyone? Just wait until you see the damage fish oil will be linked to 30 years from now, just like seed oils are starting to become linked to.

    Fish oil appears to be anti-inflammatory because its effect is similar to an NSAID - it simply shuts off the immune system response. Its rapid oxidation inside the body is so extreme, you basically shut off your immune system. Lovely.

    The Great Fish Oil Experiment

    The consequences of taking fish oil can be severe. If you want to eat fish, eat fish, but there is no reason to purposely supplement omega 3. Instead, focus on reducing omega 6 intake. There is plenty of omega 3 naturally in red meats, eggs and dairy. You don't need much at all.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 03-20-2013 at 09:21 PM.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  9. #19
    ChocoTaco369's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by springnr View Post
    Rancid fish oil is not good for you...
    So break open a capsule every now and then to check.
    All fish oil is rancid. Just like all canola and soybean oils are rancid before you even bring them home from the store. They are highly purified, refined oils. They are deodorized so you can't tell they're rancid.

    The Truth About Fish Oil

    How Fish Oil Is Processed

    Getting the omega–3 rich oil out of these bits of fish can be accomplished in several ways.

    First, the proteins in the fish are denatured, which means that heating the fish to 200 degrees for 30 minutes changes the proteins’ chemical structure. The fish are then put into presses to extract the oil.

    Once the oil has been pulled out of the fish, it can be bleached, deodorized, or purified to make it more palatable. To bleach fish oil the manufacturers use bleaching clays. Removing the fishy smell requires deodorizing the fish by injecting extremely hot steam into the oil.

    Finally the fish oil is poured through activated charcoal to get rid of contaminants like mercury, PCBs, and dioxins.
    Fish oil is heated - and since fish oil is so unstable even at room temperature, it's likely a good portion trans fat. Possibly more than seed oils because it's even less stable. It's bleached and deodorized just like rancid seed oils as well. It is awful, acute poison.

    Extrapolate - we don't like consuming refined seed oils because they are high in omega 6, which oxidizes rapidly during not only the cooking process at home, but in the refining process itself and on the store shelf. Well, fish oil is even more unstable than omega 6 seed oils. It is a health nightmare.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

  10. #20
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    This one is good, too.

    What Do Margarine And Fish Oil Have In Common? | Delia Health

    Fish oil is also sensitive to damage from the elements

    Fish oil falls into the category of an Omega 3 polyunsaturated fat. It is therefore also very sensitive to damage caused through exposure to light, heat and oxygen. In fact, fish oil is 25 times more sensitive to this kind of damage than the plant forms of Omega 3 are. This is simply due to the differences between the molecular structure of fish oil and the plant forms of Omega 3.
    Uh oh.

    Claims of purified fish oil makes consumers feel safe

    This is where the story gets really interesting. To remove most of the heavy metals, PCBs and dioxins, known cancer-causing compounds, from the fish oil, manufacturers have to heat the oil. When they heat the oil they can evaporate most of the toxins out of the oil. But, in the process of heating the fish oil, they are creating toxic fat molecules.

    Knowing that the fish oil they are using is purified, comforts consumers, and this is a selling point used by fish oil manufacturers. They are telling the consumer that their products contain very little toxins, but they are excluding the explanation of how they got rid of the toxins! And what the result of this purifying process is. That haven’t told the consumer that heating the fish oil is creating damaged fat molecules, like trans fats, which lead to toxicity and aging.

    Unfortunately, the presence of trans fats in fish oil is not the only piece of bad news. Other damaged fats, like polymerized, cyclised and cross-linked fats are present too. The only damaged fats we know a lot about are trans fats. These other damaged fats have not been researched in any depth yet, although there is some evidence to suggest that they are much more damaging than trans fats are.
    Mmm! Trans fats! Yum.

    Margarine and fish oil – the similarities

    The general public is now aware of the fact that polyunsaturated fats, also called Essential Fatty Acids or EFA’s, are essential for optimal physical and mental health. Although most people have focused on Omega 3, in the form of flax or fish oil, the knowledge of the importance of the Essential Fatty Acids has become much more wide-spread.

    Unfortunately, people have not been told the whole story about these critical fats. Advising people about their benefits, and leaving out the part about how sensitive to damage they are, is leaving out a very important part of the story. The average consumer has been unaware of the damaging effects that inexpensive and careless manufacturing processes cause to these delicate nutrients.

    It has taken decades for the truth about margarine to reach the general public. Many people are appalled when they realize that they have unwittingly been consuming a product which they were led to believe was healthy, but in fact contains damaging trans fats. In the same way, people are consuming fish oil, believing that they are only consuming beneficial ingredients. They are not aware of what else may be hiding in their supplement.
    Fresh fish is a fine, healthy food. It is also completely and totally unnecessary to be healthy. As for fish oil, the only thing it's good for is seasoning cast iron and making homemade paint. DO NOT CONSUME.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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