Page 8 of 52 FirstFirst ... 67891018 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 519

Thread: Women who eat a ton without gaining.... page 8

  1. #71
    PaleoMom's Avatar
    PaleoMom is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    744
    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    Oh and I hope you do really well on your journey,
    Diet itself is only a very small part of Primal health and I think a lot of people lose sight of this.
    Emotional health is just as important if not more important, being at peace is crucial to well being,
    expectations, desire, fear, regret, retribution, jealosy etc, these are all things positioned in our future and past and most of us spend 90% of our waking hours there, it is our attachment to these things that bring us misery.

    Yet happiness is only ever found in the present moment, and the present moment is all there ever is or will be.

    Vote 1 for the present moment, take in the world around you, the sights, sounds, tastes, smells, textures, use every fibre of your being to suck it up, that is where our energy comes from.

    That's not to mention the other things like built in physical activity in our daily life, social engagement etc.
    I'm slowly coming to the realization that I might have orthorexia. I spend the vast majority or my time focused on food. Counting, weighing, researching, planning, stressing over it. It blows my mind to talk with people who clearly don't think about food at all when it isn't meal time. I want to cry when I think of what I could have done with all of that time and energy.

  2. #72
    sbhikes's Avatar
    sbhikes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    9,487
    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    Consuming healthy nutrient rich Primal/Paleo foods to satiety for the bulk of the population would result in a healthy weight stable position, this may not be the position you think you should be at and if so, feel free to do all your adjustments to fine tune and tell your body you know better, knowing all the while you probably really have no idea and your body will respond in it's own way and you can then enjoy your dieting roller coaster ride, and don't kid yourself that it is right because it's kind of Primal.

    The other option is to throw out the scales and mirror and learn to accept yourself as you are, I highly doubt there is anyone out there who is eating and living Primal that has an out of control weight problem, most of the weights I see quoted are either not that excessive when slightly heavy and often sound underweight to me.
    I've pretty much come to a similar conclusion. I could try really hard to boss my body around and probably at best succeed for about 5 minutes. Or I could accept myself and see what this body can do.

    So I lift heavy and go out and enjoy life and eat lots of healthy food to support my chosen active lifestyle. I'm heavy for my size, by which I mean if some guy came over and tried to lift he me would say "Whoah, you are heavy!" and be surprised. 135, or whatever I weight now (because I haven't looked for about 4 months) really isn't that awful for a woman with my height and strength. If I wanted to be lighter and smaller I'd probably get more fragile, and I really don't want to be fragile.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 175 x 3. Current Deadlift: 225 x 3

  3. #73
    qqemokitty's Avatar
    qqemokitty is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    LBC, California
    Posts
    381
    Quote Originally Posted by PaleoMom View Post
    I'm slowly coming to the realization that I might have orthorexia. I spend the vast majority or my time focused on food. Counting, weighing, researching, planning, stressing over it. It blows my mind to talk with people who clearly don't think about food at all when it isn't meal time. I want to cry when I think of what I could have done with all of that time and energy.
    *biggest hugs*

    You are SO not alone with this. I've been so obsessed with food my whole life, I have no idea what it's like to NOT be planning my entire schedule around eating, not eating, will this involve food, won't it, etc etc.

    I am baffled and envious of people who are not constantly obsessing over food and eating. I cannot even imagine what it must be like, or what I might think about instead.

  4. #74
    excursivey's Avatar
    excursivey is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    732
    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    The other option is to throw out the scales and mirror and learn to accept yourself as you are, I highly doubt there is anyone out there who is eating and living Primal that has an out of control weight problem, most of the weights I see quoted are either not that excessive when slightly heavy and often sound underweight to me.

    Most female role models and images today are basically pre pubescent school girl form, that's not an achieaveable target for the majority of the female population.
    Coming around to this realization myself. I'm a female, 46, almost the exact same size as the OP, 5'7" and hovering between 137and 140lbs ever since I started PB back in October 2012. Spent most of my adult life til about 37 weighing between 125-130 so as I got older and starting gaining a bit it sorta freaked me out. I've thought I wanted to get back down to the "younger" weight but now I'm starting to not care anymore. I look like a real woman, gotta see that as good and not bad. And listen to my boyfriend when he says my body rocks. It does kinda wear me out every time I get on here and hear people my size whining about being fat...

    And I hope my grammar and punctuation were all acceptable.
    Breathe. Move forward.

    I just eat what I want...

  5. #75
    imgliniel's Avatar
    imgliniel is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    southern ca
    Posts
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by magnolia1973 View Post
    ? I don't know. I spend a lot of time with horses. In a barn, you may have a very fat horse that eats very little, and a thin horse that eats a ton. If I feed my fat horse more, he just gets fatter. If I feed my thin horse less, he gets thinner. There may be diagnosable issues (commonly ulcers in a thin horse, metabolic diseases in a fat one). But in a lot of cases, metabolism is genetic (you take it back to the breed). Very rare to see a fat TB, under any feeding program; very uncommon to see a thin QH unless they are being very purposefully starved.

    Then you factor in the physical activity- the heavy horse may be in hard work and lean. The thin horse may be nervous and fretful. But I can't do much to make it so that the heavy horse can eat more like the thin horse; and we are controlling for behavior and environment.

    It would be really cool if you could increase your metabolism by eating more. But I don't know, I don't have much desire to eat an extra 500 calories of whole foods. Yeah, if I could increase it and eat what I do right now, plus I could add in say, 500 calories of paleo treats, I'd be all over that. But to add in a few more eggs and some veggies unless I was hungry doesn't seem worth it.
    So I'll go back to the topic at hand momentarily but I couldn't help but comment here, lol.

    In my experience and my naturopathic vets experience, and my equine nutritionists experience (and she has a phd and has written books lol). Most of these problems with horses can be managed or changed by allowing the horse to live and eat the way horses evolved to do. Feed the fat horse 2 square meals a day of hay and his belly is empty throughout the middle of the day, his stomach continues to secrete acid because he is designed by nature to be constantly grazing and constantly on the move, he gets stressed, and pigs out at his next meal. This is the hay vacume you have probably experienced many times before. Put that same horse in a larger turn out so he can move around more, and start free feeding him APPROPRIATE (this is key) hay, and he will lose weight and normalize. After a week or 2 he will stop being the hay vacume and he will nibble at his pile throghout the day as he sees fit. His overall intake will probably be less then it was when he was geetting two meals a day. I have two horses currenty, and have owned a total of 4 in my past, and that doesn't include the ones that I have managed for clients. I have normalized and slimmed down many cresty confirmed insulin resistant via blood test horses using this method. My two personal horses average only three small to medium flakes of hay a day being free fed. appropriate hay is a good grass hay that is low in sugar and high in digestible fiber. (you have to have the hay tested to figure this out, and this is achieved by cutting hay under the proper weather conditions at the appropriate maturity stage of the grass).

    Ok, back to the topic at hand lol.

  6. #76
    eKatherine's Avatar
    eKatherine is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    5,372
    I used to eat a ton of food back when I was speedskating, lifting heavy, and doing lots of cardio. I put on weight and got bulky-looking.

  7. #77
    imgliniel's Avatar
    imgliniel is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    southern ca
    Posts
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Incindiary View Post
    I don't have much to say about the original topic other than to say I'm a tall woman, now in my mid-forties, who has been relatively slender her whole life. For those brief periods of time (usually less than a year), when I did find myself 10-15 lbs overweight, it was because I was eating absolute crap (fast food, frozen pizza, crackers, etc) on a consistent basis. I cut that shit out, I lose weight. My body really does seem to prefer the high-fat, low-carb WOE. But's that's just me. Your body may prefer something different.

    I do want to comment briefly on the horse topic. On a functional level, there is virtually no genetic difference between wild and domestic horses. "Wild" or feral horses in the American West travel up to 20-30 miles a day in search of grass, which for most of the year is relatively low in sugar. In the spring, when the sugar content of grass shoots way up, wild horses may pack on the pounds, but those fat stores are burned up later when the grass isn't as abundant or rich. So, for most of the year, the wild horse is moving most of the day, low and slow, and eating grasses with relatively lower sugar contents. These horses rarely have metabolic issues such as insulin-resistance or founder.

    What do we do with our domestic horses? We park them in a stall or in a lush pasture and feed them way more sugar than they need. We also greatly curtail their movement. They no longer have to walk 20 miles a day in search of food. The result is often horses with metabolic issues, which all too often present as hoof issues. Mustangs pulled off the range and placed in BLM holding pens will often develeop the same metabolic issues as domestic horses. The lesson learned here is that when we move a horse to far away from it's natural way of living, bad things can happen to it.

    I'm not sure what any of that has to do with the original topic, but there it is.

    ETA: Magnolia is correct that certain breeds of horses will have different caloric needs, but WHAT they should eat, and the need for movement, is consistent throughout the species.
    QTF!!

    and I see everyone beat me to the horse topic........

    if any of us are near enough to each other we should get together for a paleo peeps ride!

    (socal for me btw)

  8. #78
    magnolia1973's Avatar
    magnolia1973 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3,888
    My two personal horses average only three small to medium flakes of hay a day being free fed. appropriate hay is a good grass hay that is low in sugar and high in digestible fiber.
    I get the whole what you feed matters thing. But bottom line, horses doing the same amount of work do not all have the same caloric needs. They may on a hay based diet stop overeating and fall (or increase)to the correct weight, but they won't all eat the same. My horse would be skin and bones if you fed her 3 flakes of hay a day. She gets about 6 a day plus pasture, plus a small amount of feed. But yes, there are horses in my barn that could eat 3-6 flakes of hay a day with no feed and be in good weight. To me, that is a sign that horses all have different metabolisms.

    People have varying caloric needs from very little to very high. It's based on age, genetics, and activity, and to a degree, food quality. I don't think we can change that equation very much. It's worth the experiment, but if it takes you 1200 calories to maintain on whole foods, I am not sold on the idea that eating 2000 calories of whole foods will also allow you to maintain.

    http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
    Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

  9. #79
    magnolia1973's Avatar
    magnolia1973 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    3,888
    Magnolia is correct that certain breeds of horses will have different caloric needs, but WHAT they should eat, and the need for movement, is consistent throughout the species.
    This.... and it goes the same for humans. What and how we should eat is likely uniform. But we will all have different caloric needs. I'm not sure just eating more will impact that.

    http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
    Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

  10. #80
    imgliniel's Avatar
    imgliniel is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    southern ca
    Posts
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by magnolia1973 View Post
    I get the whole what you feed matters thing. But bottom line, horses doing the same amount of work do not all have the same caloric needs. They may on a hay based diet stop overeating and fall (or increase)to the correct weight, but they won't all eat the same. My horse would be skin and bones if you fed her 3 flakes of hay a day. She gets about 6 a day plus pasture, plus a small amount of feed. But yes, there are horses in my barn that could eat 3-6 flakes of hay a day with no feed and be in good weight. To me, that is a sign that horses all have different metabolisms.

    People have varying caloric needs from very little to very high. It's based on age, genetics, and activity, and to a degree, food quality. I don't think we can change that equation very much. It's worth the experiment, but if it takes you 1200 calories to maintain on whole foods, I am not sold on the idea that eating 2000 calories of whole foods will also allow you to maintain.
    Oh no I didn't mean all horses would end up consuming the same or had the exact same caloric need, absolutely they would all end up consuming different amounts, and yes based on how much work they are doing, size, metabolism, etc they will all have slightly different needs. I focused on the overweight horses because that seemed the most relevant, the assumption I was trying to disprove or refute was the if I feed him more he'll get fatter thing. The approach to managing a grazing animal with infrequent concentrated meals causes a stress response that causes these horses to overeat and if truely left to their own devices most horses (I qualify with most because of things like cushings which really screw up a horses natural metabolic balance) will self regulate appropriately for their needs. Absolutely a nervous TB with a higher metabolic rate will end up eating more, my point was more that a horse put into a more "natural" environment (allowed to move, no tiny stalls) and free fed wil find the correct intake for themsleves, sort of the eat when hungry, stop when full thing for humans. Weather that is more or less. I have seen skinny nervous hot TB's settle down and stop pacing their weight off.

    In other words I agree that she should eat freely of biologically appropriate food when ever she wants as much as she wants. You were using the fat horses fed more get fatter to question that, I was pointing out the species inappropraite management, not the horses metabolism, causes it. I agree horses have individual metabolisms.

    did that make sense? I may just be rambling.

Page 8 of 52 FirstFirst ... 67891018 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •